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Taking a somewhat minimalist approach to firearms

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Jason_W, May 3, 2013.

  1. mgmorden

    mgmorden Senior Member

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    Eh - you can minimalize, but realistically I don't see a lot of point in owning multiple guns in the same caliber (particularly for rifles and shotguns) except for novelty/fun factor, but novelty/fun factor doesn't jive with trying to save money.

    If you really want to save money, then a single 12ga and a single .308 would likely do fine for all your actual needs. If you just want guns to shoot, then you're not really saving money, so who not get some extra stuff in other calibers? If things tighten up its not like it'll hurt to cut back to shooting one or two of your guns for specific needs (hunting, etc).

    That's just me though - I'm addicted to variety. I don't like to buy duplicates of any type of gun, and I love having different calibers available (I'm of the mind that if I find it on the shelf, I want something at home that can shoot it :D).
     
  2. PedalBiker

    PedalBiker Member

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    We have 4 varieties of ice cream in the freezer.

    Variety is nice.
     
  3. 87jeep

    87jeep New Member

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    Too many of you expect to buy ammo if SHTF...

    You must have it on hand guys!

    For me 9mm, 45 acp, 223/556, 12ga. :cool:
     
  4. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Senior Member

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    No pistol? what if you want to conceal your weapon?
     
  5. Dean1818

    Dean1818 Member

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    To me, you almost HAVE to reload to insure constant supply.

    I buy components in bulk (fortunately before all heck broke loose)

    The common calibers are almost always gone when a political problem arises

    Lets be honest...... If there is something that has a great chance of being a constant....

    Its political problems aground 2A.

    I shoot mainly 6.8 SPC..... Its a bit of an oddball, but fits the all around needs for myself.

    I also shoot 40 cal, 8mm, 45 cal, and 12

    I may add a 308 later, but reloading has kept me shooting when others are staying home
     
  6. Jason_W

    Jason_W Senior Member

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    That depends on the kind of hunting being done and the variety of terrain. The rifle that is optimal for hunting deer from a tree stand overlooking a corn field may not be the best when picking your way through a cedar swamp.
     
  7. Ed Ames

    Ed Ames Senior Member

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    We aren't talking SHTF. Poor retail availability of ammo is NOT TEOTWAWKI.

    Anyway, you can't stock for every circumstance. Especially not if you are talking a "minimalist" approach. You stock for what you think you need.... then you find yourself unemployed for a few years, or changing marriage status, or responsible for additional people (kids, parents, whatever), and your needs change and your stock needs to change too.
     
  8. Jsg81

    Jsg81 New Member

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    Oddly enough I have been thinking of changing from 30-30 to 30-06 because of not being able to find 30-30 locally at this time.

    I do need to get into reloading but I never would have dreamed that it would ever be hard to find.

    Outside of that 22lr, 45acp, 12ga and my needs are taken care of. I'm thinking of picking up a convertible Ruger Blackhawk so I can use 45lc and 45 acp in the same gun with simplification in mind as well.
     
  9. mgmorden

    mgmorden Senior Member

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    The poster mentioned 12ga and .308 being his primary concerns in his first message. I personally buy almost only pistols these days but I was just speaking to his needs ;).
     
  10. mgmorden

    mgmorden Senior Member

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    Not "best", but you can certainly find a rifle that will work perfectly fine for both uses. The same could be said for the caliber too though.

    That's kinda the point I was making. If you're trying to save money and cut back, then you're not doing yourself any favors by buying lots of rifles in the same caliber. Not to mention that most "practical" uses of firearms don't really need a lot of ammo. A box of 20 rounds will last me 2-3 years in my hunting guns. Most of large expenditures of ammo often break down into leisure shooting (which is fine - Lord knows I shoot a ton of ammo I don't really "need" to :)).
     
  11. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Senior Member

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    oh, thank jesus...
     
  12. Hokkmike

    Hokkmike Senior Member

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    My caliber choice is dictated on the gun that suits my needs best.

    6.5x55 as best deer rifle. (because it is)

    .32 mag for handgun target and HD. (the benefits of larger calibers without the heroics)

    8mm and 7.62x39 because I have some milsurp collectibles.

    .22 mag as plinker, training, and fun gun.....
     
  13. Ed Ames

    Ed Ames Senior Member

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    Minimalist is, like everything else, defined by context. Yours, mine, and the OP's can all legitimately differ.

    My question about minimalism is this: what does it gain you?

    Guns, especially if you move away from banbait models, are cheap. It's actually a problem in a way. I have several guns that I keep simply because they aren't worth enough to pay for selling them. As in they don't cost me anything in the safe, but selling would take time and energy and I wouldn't get enough money out of the deal to make that a fair trade. Nobody wants an old savage .222 for example. Not enough to pay me what it would take to make me go through the bother of selling.

    I bet I could buy all the equipment a person needs to go hunting for under $200 (2013) dollars right now, ammo included. Not much of an bet actually - I could do that buying all new gear.

    The incremental costs of supporting a new cartridge are low. If you shoot .308 and want to add .243, it is just the price of another rifle, another box of ammo, and another set of loading dies. If you shop and buy used that can be under $300 total. If it gains you flexibility, access to ammo/reloading supplies, or much of anything else, why wouldn't you do that?

    There are circumstances where it makes sense. Living in an RV for example. Short of that I'm not 100% seeing it.
     
  14. Jason_W

    Jason_W Senior Member

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    Mostly to keep things simple and cut down on the volume of stuff I have clogging up my living space. Part of my approach has a much to do with how I want to live life in general (clutter free) as it does about a practical approach to hunting and shooting.
     
  15. Jason_W

    Jason_W Senior Member

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    For centerfire rifles, I agree. One or two in the right chambering will likely do everything you need them to.

    When it comes to shotguns, however, I'd like to get a little more specialized.
     
  16. majortoo

    majortoo New Member

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    Options

    Well, ammo is scarce. No doubt. I don't want to get into conspiracy theories, but that option is still on the table! (Hey, just five years ago, I bought Winchester 9mm 124 grain NATO, which is basically a plus P FMJ load, at 500 rounds for $100) That was .20 per round. Now, I see inferior quality FMJ going at four times that price. Someone is getting rich here, and it is not me!
     
  17. Ed Ames

    Ed Ames Senior Member

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    The following doesn't relate to you. It's just a personal gripe of mine. I don't know anything about your situation and make no assumptions about you.

    I think there is a media and culture problem with "stuff" at times.

    There are TV shows that really push the idea that the viewers will lead better lives if they just get rid of what they own. They portray owning "too much" as a disease. They encourage people to sell anything that hasn't been used recently, right down to suggesting you sell your winter clothes each spring. These TV shows tend to be sponsored by companies that sell the types of products the shows encourage viewers to discard. The house-clutter shows are sponsored by companies that sell furniture, the clothes-clutter shows are sponsored by companies that sell clothes. I'm not saying there is a conspiracy or anything. It's just a healthy case of corporate self interest.

    Now there is truth to the idea that buying too much can be a symptom of unhappiness. There is a correlation between depression and impulse buying. Depression is a disease, or at least the extreme forms can be. But...I think that sometimes unhappy people see these TV shows where the actors give up their stuff and are happy and they buy into it as a way to become happy themselves. I've seen people in the grip of that destroy family photographs going back 4 generations, throw away furniture their grandparents built by hand, destroy tens of thousands of dollars in personal wealth, and do all sorts of other stuff they later regretted. It is a destructive force, just like anything else is when taken to excess.

    There are many categories of possession which are only useful if they are owned in advance of need. A fire extinguisher at the hardware store does you no good when your microwave catches fire. Groceries leaving the store in all your neighbors' hands do you no good when a storm is predicted and your pantry is empty. Clothes in a store do you no good when....you get the idea. Tools in general are usually in this category, and guns can be tools.

    The real balance is between how having less will improve your life (and it will...easier to move if nothing else), vs. how much all that stuff improves your life. My life is much better because I have tools to do 1000 odd jobs that most people can't do for themselves, because I have rifles in .17 and .45 caliber, because I have a handgun, because I own a utility trailer instead of renting u-hauls, because I have a leather jacket I bought - gasp - more than 3 months ago! I also have a place to store all of my stuff. If I didn't, I would own less...and my quality of life would be lower.

    The pendulum swings, we all go back and forth, and theoretically it all balances out over time. Obviously, I'm on the "more, in moderation, is good" side. Doesn't make me right or other people wrong, but I worry that people are being encouraged to live in a way that maybe makes a lot of sense in a major city when all you can afford is a 250 square foot apartment and where "help" will be smotheringly close in an emergency, but doesn't have much bearing in the real world.

    Sorry for the rant.
     
  18. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Senior Member

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    Man I like that rant.

    Let me put it this way. Im 27, and I'm two years into being a homeowner. Most of my friends live in crumby apartments (not saying my house isnt sometimes crummy:) ) or in their parents basements! As a homeowner I literally BASK in the GLORY of having my own space. That which i can do whatever it is I please whenever it is I would like. I have friends and aquaintences who have come and gone, left tools here, and their mine now! All because they had no where to put it!, I got my grill that way, A lincoln welder, and many other things... Now, these things are useful in their own regard. I love having them. But, I have two grills (propane and a smoker), I sincerly dont think i need another one. That sort of where the minimalization of caliber comes into play. Im not a prepper, but i like to be well stocked on ALL of the ammo for ALL of my guns. Thats very difficult to do esspecially in times like these when you shoot 20 different calibers. Ive been there before, its almost overwhelming at times to monitor your supply efficient and effectivly. So thats why i broke it down. I find my shooting experiences are more pleasurable this way. I dont worry much about the money, as its all simply aco****ed for in my head. Its just easier to budget what i can take to the range, and when i need to go a-scrounging for more rounds. Thats all, Simplified. But dont get me wrong. If a buddy were to leave a new gun at my place, with no intention of ever picking it up... :) I certainly aint throwing it away.
     
  19. justice06rr

    justice06rr Senior Member

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    I would agree that streamlining your arsenal to a few common calibers is a good idea. Not having ammo to shoot on a particular gun is no fun. 12ga is usually plentiful in gun/ammo department, everything else is relative.
     
  20. Jason_W

    Jason_W Senior Member

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    Well, I'm not going quite that far overboard. And trust me, when we get rid of something, it's because it's worn out and crappy. Usually, we don't have the funds to replace it so no one is making any money off of us. We don't subscribe to a TV service, so I know nothing of the shows to which you're referring.

    As someone pointed out, minimalist is a relative term. in the strictest sense, that could mean one rifle, one shotgun, a .22 lr, and just enough ammo to get through a hunting season. I have no desire to pare things down that quite that much (though with the panic shortage I may not have a choice).

    What I am no longer interested in is having dozens of guns chambered in dozens of rounds with the associated hodge-podge of ammo, reloading tools, and components. A centerfire rifle or two in a versatile round and 2-3 shotguns along with 500 or so rounds for each will cover my bases and won't take up a ton of space in my work room.
     
  21. btg3

    btg3 Senior Member

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    To me, you almost HAVE to buy bulk ammo to insure constant supply.

    I buy ammo in bulk (fortunately before all heck broke loose)

    The common calibers are almost always gone when a political problem arises

    Lets be honest...... If there is something that has a great chance of being a constant....

    Its political problems aground 2A.

    I shoot mainly 9mm and 22LR..... common calibers that fits the all around needs for myself.

    I also shoot and stock a few others.

    Have bulk ammo has kept me shooting when others are staying home ;)
     
  22. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Senior Member

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    Ghhhaaaa

    .. Just added .44 mag to the list.
     

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