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Tell me about progressive presses...

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by heypete, Apr 18, 2007.

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  1. heypete

    heypete Member

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    I'm considering getting a progressive press for reloading, and have a few questions for this august community.

    First off, a brief summary of what I'll be using it for and my desired qualities in a press:
    - I will be loading 9mm, .45 ACP, .223 Remington, and .30-06 Springfield. I would prefer to be able to load all those cartridges on the same press, though obviously with different dies and whatnot.
    - I can deprime/resize on my Lee Challenger press if needed.
    - I can hand-prime if needed.
    - I would very much prefer to have a case and bullet feeder so I don't have to individually insert every case into the press, and place each bullet for seating.
    - I would very much like the press to have a means of ejecting completed cartridges so I don't need to manually remove them -- it'd be much easier to collect them in a box or bucket.
    - In regards to the previous two points, I'd really like to automate the loading process to the greatest degree possible, as I find it incredibly tedious to feed each case, insert a bullet, and remove each case a few hundred times per session.
    - The press must be able to accept standard-threaded dies.
    - I've had excellent experience with Lee presses and dies, and would prefer the use of their products where possible.
    - I am looking to spend no more than $300 on a press, and that's stretching it.
    - The press and other parts must easily break down into a moderately sized box no larger than about 3'x3'x1.5' for storage, as I live in a small apartment and having a massive reloading press in the corner would look quite odd.

    One of the presses that seems to be common, affordable, and well-regarded by reviewers at Midway is the Lee Progressive 1000 press. For the cost of a Dillon 550, I can get a Lee Pro 1000, dies for all the calibers listed, tumbler, media, as well as a bunch of bullets for the different calibers.

    However, Midway uses the same stock picture for their pistol and rifle caliber kits, and the descriptions are not really all that detailed. Lee's site says that their rifle kits include a "case inserter" rather than a "case feeder", but don't explain the difference. I'm also not clear on the difference between the Pro 1000 and the Load Master.

    The thought has also occurred to me to consider getting multiple Lee presses, one for each caliber. With the low cost of Lee presses, this may be a viable option, as I could then tune each press for each cartridge. If the Lee ones don't auto-index or feed rifle cases/bullets, then I may consider the Lee for pistol calibers only, and something else for rifle (I shoot a lot more pistol than rifle).

    I see a good deal of recommendations for Dillon presses, but I'm unsure if they require Dillon dies or can take standard ones. Similarly, does the Dillon 550 automate the feeding of cases and bullets, and the ejection of the completed cartridges? Even for rifle calibers?

    Progressive presses offer a definite increase in productivity and organization (I have a limited amount of desk space, so having one device handle all the loading, rather than switching dies, having to hand-prime cases, and have different areas for "unprocessed cases", "deprimed and sized cases", "primed cases", "primed and charged cases", and "completed cartridges" would save me a lot of time and effort.), but I'd like to be sure I'm getting something that actually suits my needs, and would be open to progressive or turret presses -- I'm not looking to get some vast number of rounds per minute, but rather a more efficient, automated means of loading compared to doing so on a single-stage. Any advice or recommendations would be very helpful indeed.

    Cheers!
     
  2. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    "...I can deprime/resize on my Lee Challenger press if needed...I can hand-prime if needed..." Sure, but it defeats the purpose of a progressive press. Progressives do all the steps in order and kick out a loaded round at the end. If you resize, deprime and prime out of the press, it'll get confused.
    You'll need a different set of dies for each cartridge as well as a different shell plate(it's the shell holder) for the 9mm and .223. The .45 and .30-06 use the same shell plate. That's about $60 in shell plates alone.
    The Lee Pro 1000 doesn't do .30-06. The Lee Load Master does though. However, it doesn't automatically feed rifle cases.
    "...would look quite odd..." No it doesn't.
     
  3. Idano

    Idano Member

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    heypete's,

    Based upon your budget constraint only the Lee would fit the bill, well almost, it would be over $300 for all calibers. When you talk progressive expect it to be expensive. I had about $300 in my Lee and I am closer to $800 in my Hornady for three calibers. A Dillon 650 would be about the same, maybe $900

    Sunray,

    The Lee LoadMaster will feed .223, but I don't know about 30-06, I use to have one.
     
  4. mike240se

    mike240se Member

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    Have you looked at a turret press? I am thinking of getting the lee turret press, i like how you can load the dies in there own turret and not have to change them every time or adjust them, etc. Its not as automated but alot less money and will still save time.
     
  5. P0832177

    P0832177 member

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    Reloading rifle rounds progressively is not straight forward.

    There is much more case prep to loading the rounds. Even though carbide dies exist for rifle sounds they still need lube inside the case neck and on the case body. Then there is dealing with primer pocket crimp. Then there is case trimming, case mouth chamfering and deburring etc.... removing case lube etc...... So it is better process the brass a head of time and then only have to prime the brass, instill a powder charge, and seat a bullet.

    Not like loading 45ACP, once a load is worked up you can made a large production run........pretty easy

    Your first step is buying the best reference book or what I call Reloading for Dummies or The ABC's of Reloading from Krause Publications.

    There are several great reloading manuals of the real kind not the freebee ones! Freebee manuals are good for cross referencing data, at times. For meaty manuals a person can not go wrong with the Lyman48th, Hornady, and Sierra. One must always look up loads when you compare/cross-reference data. Especially in larger calibers as some data might be using different brass from yours. Case in point before the Hodgdon website upgrade they Hodgdon used WW brass to work up loads with, whereas Sierra used Fed cases in their 308 Winchester loading information. Now, Hodgdon does not list what brass the loads were worked up in.

    Press - Single Stage or Turret presses are the best way to learn before advancing to any kind of progressive press. You will always have need for a single stage press. Redding and RCBS are good sources of all kinds of presses of the single stage, turret, and progressive varieties. Dillon is the best at progressive presses. The RCBS Rockchucker Supreme is the gold standard for a single stage and Redding T7 for a turret press.

    Dies - I like Redding Dies, and I would get the carbide expander ball upgrade for bottle neck rifle cases. Dillon makes carbide rifle sizer dies, but you still need to use case lube and make sure you lube the inside of the case neck, too. I would just stick with regular dies for rifle cartridges. Dillon makes die sets specifically for their press so to speak, meaning that it does not come with a case mouth belling die; Redding makes a set of dies for progressive presses, too. I like Forster competition seaters, and they can be had as an individual item. Dies are pretty much threaded universally, except for Lyman 310 dies, and Dillon dies for the Square Deal B. Accuracy nuts will use hand dies, and they require an arbor press be used.

    Shell holders (if the die set doesn't have them like Lee) or the appropriate shell plate for the progressive press. Remember that many shell holders work for more then one cartridge. I would do some home work, especially if you get a Dillon. Some cartridge conversions might only require you to get powder funnel for the new cartridge.

    A tumbler will be a good investment, as clean cases will not harm you dies. There are vibratory and rotary tumblers out there. I like corn cob media treated with some Iosso case polish. You can get walnut in bulk at Petco or Pet Smart. Bulk corn cob grit is a great way to reduce the cost of commercially supplied media, because you pay through the nose for the treated media from other vendors.

    MTM makes great loading block tray that handles most cartridges.

    Case Lube is great for both conventional dies, and to treat your brass used in a progressive press even with carbide dies. That extra lubricity makes the cycling of the press a tad slicker! Dillon spray lube works well for shake and bake application. I like Imperial Die Wax for rifle cartridges when FL sizing.

    Case Neck Brush to clean bottleneck rifle cases

    Dial Calipers

    Case Trimmer (Lee works, but Possum Hollow is better, Wilson makes the best hand powered Lathe trimmer, and Giraud is the best powered Trimmer)

    Deburring/Chamfering Tool

    Primer Pocket Cleaner and uniformer

    Primer Flip Tray is needed for loading pick up tubes for some primer systems like the Dillon.

    Priming Tool (I like the RCBS (now even better with universal shell holder, but Sinclair makes the best)

    Powder Scale - remember that is always better to have a mechanical scale as a back up to any electronic scale.

    Powder Funnel kit with drop tubes especially if you intend to use powders like Varget.

    Powder Trickler (used to tweak powder charges)

    Powder Measure (nice for faster powder charges it does require a bit of learning curve to get consistent powder charges sort of rhythm thing) standard with progressive presses, but the RCBS Uniflow is nice! Redding makes a better one, and Harrell is the gold standard!

    Hammer Type Bullet Puller (for taking down the boo boo's)

    Ammo boxes and labels

    A notebook for recording your results! Saves covering the same ground twice!

    A chronograph is great when working up loads, but is more a luxury in the beginning.
     
  6. redneck2

    redneck2 Member

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    The Dillon factory is right up in Phoenix on the N.E. side of town right off the 202 Outer belt. It'd be worth the drive just to get an idea of how things work.

    Depends you your volume, but...

    I'd personally advise against the Lee progressive. I have friend that has 4 of them. Don't remember the model number, but there was always a lot of piddling and fiddling when loading. IMO, the one area that gets you into trouble or gives problems is when you start, stop, and mess around. Lee turrets and single stage seem fine.

    I use Lee dies and really like them. They use standard threads.

    Even though I have a Dillon, I load rifle one at a time. You probably won't shoot enough rifle to need to load progressive. Pistol is a different program, and a single stage would be WAY slow IMO.

    If I couldn't swing the money for a good progressive (Hornady or Dillon) right now, I'd get a Lee turret to get by, then get the progressive later. You can always leave the turret set up with the rifle dies and use it later.

    As for break-down, with the Dillon you can pull two pins and easily slide the tool head with dies and powder measure out. With the turret, you can pop off the turret and knock it down. Don't know about the Hornady.

    check e-bay. Bottom line is that a decent progressive is going to run about $500 with all the stuff you should have. There is no such thing as a good progressive for cheap that I've seen.
     
  7. DaveInFloweryBranchGA

    DaveInFloweryBranchGA Member

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    Pete,


    "- I will be loading 9mm, .45 ACP, .223 Remington, and .30-06 Springfield. I would prefer to be able to load all those cartridges on the same press, though obviously with different dies and whatnot."

    First, you are reloading rifle and pistol, but you don't say in what quantities. For the rifle cartridges, you may want to consider runout, as this affects accuracy.

    "- I can deprime/resize on my Lee Challenger press if needed.
    - I can hand-prime if needed."

    This shows me you're not a new reloader, but are tired of the speed you're not getting with the single stage. So you know how to set up dies and make cartridges.

    "- I would very much prefer to have a case and bullet feeder so I don't have to individually insert every case into the press, and place each bullet for seating."

    Case feeders are nice things, but I've read of many folks, including a good buddy of mine, that have found the bullet feeder doesn't gain them anything in production time, so they manually feed the bullets.

    "- I would very much like the press to have a means of ejecting completed cartridges so I don't need to manually remove them -- it'd be much easier to collect them in a box or bucket."

    Most all progressives offer this feature and some progressives have a place to attach an Akro style bin to catch the loaded rounds.

    "- In regards to the previous two points, I'd really like to automate the loading process to the greatest degree possible, as I find it incredibly tedious to feed each case, insert a bullet, and remove each case a few hundred times per session."

    I think you would find this significantly less tedious with either an automated turret or a progressive, due to the fact you're not doing it nearly so often and bullets pile up pretty quickly.

    "- The press must be able to accept standard-threaded dies."

    All progressives except the Dillon SBD do this.

    "- I've had excellent experience with Lee presses and dies, and would prefer the use of their products where possible."

    All progressives accept Lee dies.

    "- I am looking to spend no more than $300 on a press, and that's stretching it."

    I'll assume here you're talking about just the press itself, without the dies and parts needed to change calibers. Because if you're talking about the whole kit and kaboodle, you can't buy a progressive


    "- The press and other parts must easily break down into a moderately sized box no larger than about 3'x3'x1.5' for storage, as I live in a small apartment and having a massive reloading press in the corner would look quite odd."

    You might also want to consider a setup on a steel cart that you could roll away into a closet/laundry room. That's what I had when I lived in an apartment. Was a good solution for me.

    "One of the presses that seems to be common, affordable, and well-regarded by reviewers at Midway is the Lee Progressive 1000 press. For the cost of a Dillon 550, I can get a Lee Pro 1000, dies for all the calibers listed, tumbler, media, as well as a bunch of bullets for the different calibers."

    This press would probably do well for you related to the pistol calibers, but would be slightly strained with .223 and I don't think it will handle the 30-06. It also has some known problem issues with the primer feed according to a buddy of mine, who never could get his primer feed to work. He's since gotten rid of it and gotten a Loadmaster and a Classic turret press. He's much happier with them. You also limit yourself to only three dies, so no separate seat and crimp for pistol rounds.

    "However, Midway uses the same stock picture for their pistol and rifle caliber kits, and the descriptions are not really all that detailed. Lee's site says that their rifle kits include a "case inserter" rather than a "case feeder", but don't explain the difference. I'm also not clear on the difference between the Pro 1000 and the Load Master."

    I've seen both up close. The Loadmaster is a much more substantial press and is capable of loading 30-06. It does require some tinkering and proper setup to keep it running right. But so does the Pro 1000. Were I you, based, on needing to reload 30-06, I would pay the difference and get the Loadmaster instead if your budget limits you to Lee progressives.

    "The thought has also occurred to me to consider getting multiple Lee presses, one for each caliber. With the low cost of Lee presses, this may be a viable option, as I could then tune each press for each cartridge. If the Lee ones don't auto-index or feed rifle cases/bullets, then I may consider the Lee for pistol calibers only, and something else for rifle (I shoot a lot more pistol than rifle)."

    This is going to put you significantly out of the budget you mentioned earlier. You would be better off looking at a more expensive progressive in this case.

    "I see a good deal of recommendations for Dillon presses, but I'm unsure if they require Dillon dies or can take standard ones. Similarly, does the Dillon 550 automate the feeding of cases and bullets, and the ejection of the completed cartridges? Even for rifle calibers?"

    Except for the SBD, they take standard dies, but if you're reloading rifle, the Hornady Lock N Load is a better press than the 550, matches the 650 with better features and costs less than both when you add in caliber changes. Here's a comparision between the Lee Loadmsater, the Dillon 650 and the Hornady Lock and Load AP:

    http://www.comrace.ca/cmfiles/dillonLeeHornadyComparison.pdf

    "Progressive presses offer a definite increase in productivity and organization (I have a limited amount of desk space, so having one device handle all the loading, rather than switching dies, having to hand-prime cases, and have different areas for "unprocessed cases", "deprimed and sized cases", "primed cases", "primed and charged cases", and "completed cartridges" would save me a lot of time and effort.), but I'd like to be sure I'm getting something that actually suits my needs, and would be open to progressive or turret presses -- I'm not looking to get some vast number of rounds per minute, but rather a more efficient, automated means of loading compared to doing so on a single-stage. Any advice or recommendations would be very helpful indeed."

    After all of the above and based on your budget, I think unless you compete or have very limited amounts of time, you may be better off looking at a Lee Classic Turret press. This turret has automatic advance of the dies, has a four hole turret so you can separate the seat and crimp functions of the dies, is very clean thanks to the spent primer drain and tube through the middle of the ram that routes the spent primes away from the press, has an excellent leverage system, is very smooth, made of cast iron and steel.

    Combine this with a Safety Prime kit in lg/sm primers and a Pro Auto Disk powder measure (for pistol) and you're easily loading 200 rounds an hour. This is a heckuva lot more than your single stage can do. In realistic terms, this means four hours a month for 800 rounds with zero drama.

    If you want to load rifle, you can add an RCBS Uniflow powder measure and a case activated powder drop, either RCBS or Hornady and have an excellent rifle reloading setup. You can get setup for about $250.00, including Lee Deluxe four die sets, for a single pistol caliber. If you have dies for your rifle calibers, a caliber change is a $10.00 turret, though they're on sale right now for $8.50 from Midwayusa. So basically a caliber change is a ten buck turret and a die set. Hard to beat that.


    A final thought for you. I own a Hornady Lock N Load progressive. I also own a Lee Classic Cast Turret press with turrets setup as I suggested to load my small to medium volume military surplus rifle cases using lead bullets. I also have a Lee Classic Cast single stage. I've owned a Dillon 550, a Lyman T-mag Turret press, a RCBS Rock Chucker and started reloading with an RCBS Partner press single stage, very similar setup to what you're reloading with now. I shot high power for several years. What's all that have to do with anything?

    If the Lee Classic Turret and Classic Cast single stage had been available to when I first bought my Hornady, I would have bought them and they would have been all I ever needed for most any endeavor and the speed of the Classic turret has been enough faster than loading single stage I would never have missed reloading on a progressive. Only if you need to reload for pistol competition or have no little time to reload do you absolutely need a progressive. Now if you have lots of money and don't want to spend much time reloading, then a progressive is a good option.

    Just some thoughts.

    Regards,

    Dave
     
  8. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    With a 650 setup with case and bullet feeders it takes 3.5 minutes to load 100 rounds. It’s a smooth operation of “one one thousand up and two one thousand down” It is however, relatively expensive so you have to decide if how much you shoot is worth the investment. .223 is the only rifle round I shoot enough of to progressively reload, you will wish you had purchased a 1050 when you come across crimped primers.
     

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  9. benedict1

    benedict1 Member

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    With $300 Budget, Lee Classic Turret is Best Answer.

    Dave has given you the best analysis. Sure, if you had $6-700 to spend a Dillon setup for a couple of calibers would be nice. But you don't seem to be into high volume shooting and you have to stretch your dollars.

    You can get a complete Lee Classic Turret Press, with upgrade to Pro Auto Disk Powder measure plus a scale for about $175, complete for one caliber, at Kempf's Gun Shop right now--oh, for $8 more you can get the large and small priming features of the Safety Prime.

    http://www.kempfgunshop.com/products/reloading/leeprecision/kits/KempfKit.html

    For $39 you can another caliber-dies and turret. For 300 bucks you can have one pile of reloading stuff!

    And this is an outstanding turret press! Cast iron and steel, auto-indexing, and to my mind, the Lee Safety Prime System which is just the best priming system available today--no sideways, tipped, crushed primers, no missed primers. Works every time as it should.

    This press will do a dandy job on rifles too. There are a bunch of guys on this and other forums who've commented on its usefulness on .223 and .30-06.

    I don't know of any other way to get going with all the calibers you want and have a great press to boot except with the Classic Turret Press.
     
  10. heypete

    heypete Member

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    Thank you all for your excellent advice. It seems as though my current situation is more suited for the Lee Classic Turret Press rather than a full-blown progressive.

    I will look through the wealth of information here and elsewhere, but that one looks quite appealing indeed.

    Cheers!
     
  11. DaveInFloweryBranchGA

    DaveInFloweryBranchGA Member

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    "With a 650 setup with case and bullet feeders it takes 3.5 minutes to load 100 rounds. "

    This lovely sounding figure of 1740 rounds per hour excludes all setup, press cleaning and preparation, loading primers, powder, brasses cases and bullets, adjustments, lubrication and cleanup time. One would be well advised to factor those things in when they're translating into rounds per hour.

    When you add in those factors, the 650 without a bullet feeder will provide between 400-1000 rounds per hour, depending on accessories and the skill of the operator. Of course, like anything else, the more accessories and skill, the more RPH.

    Practical realities are much lower when getting ready and clean up times are factored in. The 200 rounds per hour I stated above includes setup, prep and take down time.

    Regards,

    Dave
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2007
  12. Idano

    Idano Member

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    I second Dave's comments. Realistically with a casefeeder I can barely load more then 400 rounds in a single hour. That time includes eight powder checks, four primer powder refills emptying the bullet bin and boxing or stripper clipping the finished rounds. That time does not account for the tumbling, trimming, depriming and pocket cleaning I always do in advance.
     
  13. robctwo

    robctwo Member

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    I took the case feeder off of my Hornady LnL. Also removed the ejection wire. I load about 200 per hour pistol, and do not feel rushed. That time includes recharging the primer tubes, refilling the powder drop and boxing the bullets. Really flying with the case feeder and ejection wire I got 350-400 per hour and felt like I was running behind on a production schedule at the local mill. I don't want that feeling at home with a hobby. I generally load for an hour or so after dinner three or four times per week.

    I've been very happy with my Hornady. Over 54,000 loaded and still going strong.
     
  14. racerrck

    racerrck Member

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    I 've got The Dillon 550b it started life as an AT500 I too am married therefore broke when I get a little extra cash I add to it maybe a case feeder is next I can do about 400 pistol rounds 9mm 40 s&w and 45 acp 223 usually a little less After about 10 years I broke a part in the primer install part of the machine I had a spare to install and finished my task at hand then called Dillon and a replacement was on its way No questions asked It wasn't a expensive part thats noy the point Dillons no BS warranty is forever and thats worth the intial cost in my book
     
  15. benedict1

    benedict1 Member

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    Off the target--

    I think a lot of you have missed a point or two--the thread starter says he can only afford $300 and whatever he gets has to be portable enough to easily store in a box 3'x3'x1.5'

    The Dillon warranty is great--for $300 he can't really play though, can he? I might add the Lee warranty is 2 years, unconditional warranty; after that time it is conditional in that if a major part breaks through normal wear, they are going to replace it. Many guys have experienced this type of service from them.

    Second, taking down any progressive press and sticking it in a box is not all that easy--the Lee Classic Turret is simple--remove the turret/dies, take off the handle and unbolt from bench; into box and into storage.
     
  16. hornadylnl

    hornadylnl Member

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    My philosophy on buying stuff is this. Either go dirt cheap or buy the best. I learned that when I was young and into car stereos. Many of my friends would buy $300 cd players when they really wanted $500+ cd players and later, they would buy the $500 cd player and nobody wanted to give them more than $50 for that $300 cd player. My point is that sometimes you need to fork out the money up front to save money in the future.

    I started off with a Lee Anniversary kit and then bought a Lee Pro 1000. It became apparent quickly that the pro 1000 wasn't going to suit my long term wants and needs for a progressive press. I wanted to be able to load more than the 1 caliber it was set up for and began pricing caliber conversions for it. It became clear that I was going to a lot of money tied up in caliber conversions for a press that wasn't going to be my last press. I saved up and bought my Hornady LNL AP. The only step up from that is the Dillon 1050 and for the price of that, I can afford to shell out a few extra dollars for non crimped brass.

    One option that hasn't been mentioned is the Hornayd LNL Classic press. It's a single stage with the lock and load bushing system. Once you get your dies set up, in 2 seconds you can switch dies. I have an LNL Classic press as well for non progressive work. It is essentially the same thing as a turret press. If you buy it, you get 500 free bullets from Hornady as well. If you buy the press only and not the kit, the press is almost free after you factor in the cost of the bullets.

    If you want a Dillon or a Hornady progressive in the long run, spend your money on an LNL Classic or a turret because you will still be able to use that in the future. Once I got my LNL AP, my Pro 1000 went on ebay.
     
  17. MarshallDodge

    MarshallDodge Member

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    I went from the Lee Challenger Anniversary kit to the Dillon RL550B. The only thing I bought was the press and the video and it was up and running in about 30 minutes after watching the video. I used the Lee dies that I had from the Challenger.

    I reload all of the calibers you listed on a RL550B. I do not have a case feeder or bullet feeder and do not see a need for one unless I was in business cranking out thousands of rounds per day. If that were the case then I would own a 1050. The biggest pain is changing between large and small primers which takes about 20 minutes but I found a used 550 and so I have one setup for each.

    On the rifle cases I prep them thoroughly (deprime, size, trim, polish, etc.) before running them through the press.
     
  18. RustyFN

    RustyFN Member

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    I am confused how the single stage is the same thing as a turret. In a SS you can only install one die at a time. My turret press holds four dies. On the SS you have to load in steps. On the turret you can pull the handle four times and have a finished round. With the SS you will load between 50 and 75 per hour. On the Lee classic turret you will load 200 per hour. With the SS you will prime with a hand primer. On the Lee turret you prime on the press. The Hornady is $300. The Lee classic turret is only $150 and IMO a lot more press. Here is a turret press
    Rusty
    PS, sorry it won't come with the three ball.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  19. hornadylnl

    hornadylnl Member

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    The Hornady LNL classic is around $120. It is the same as a non indexing turret in that after you put your die bushings on and get them adjusted, you simply twist out one die and twist in the new one. The LNL bushing systme is the greatest innovation in reloading since probably the first progressive press.

    Even with an indexing turret, it still takes 3 or 4 cranks of the handle for one loaded round. With my LNL AP, it only takes one.:D

    ETA A set of 4 LNL bushings costs slightly more than a spare lee turret but with the LNL bushings, I can swap out a full length sizer with a neck sizer instantly or I can swap out two different seater dies for different bullet seating depths on the same caliber instantly. To do that with a turret, you'd have to maintain two different turrets with 2 complete sets of dies. If I want an instant change from 230gr fmj on 45 at 1.230" to 200gr swc at 1.190, all I need is a second seater die and another bushing.
     
  20. RustyFN

    RustyFN Member

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    Location:
    West Virginia
    Sorry I still don't see changing the die every handle pull being the same thing as a turret. If you are going to use the Hornady that way I am thinking less than 50 per hour, and you still don't have a priming system. Don't get me wrong, I am not saying there is anything wrong with Hornady. The OP was looking for something more like a progressive and a SS is the farthest thing from one.
    That is only for the press. If you want the kit which is how the turret press comes ( with everything you need ) then the Hornady will cost you $297.
    Rusty

    Edit:
    But that is also out of the price range.
     
  21. hornadylnl

    hornadylnl Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    375
    When I load single stage, I use a case block and do 50 of each process at a time. Size 50, prime 50, charge 50 and seat 50. I wasn't implying pulling each die for one case.

    http://www.wideners.com/itemdetail.cfm?item_id=2072&dir=210|214|225|415
    Wideners has the Hornady LNL Classic kit for $240. It comes with alot better stuff than the Lee. The Lee is a great option but I just want to throw another option on the table. Don't forget that the $240 is more like $150 when you factor in the 500 free bullets. Even if you only buy the press itself, you still get 500 free bullets and you can buy whatever dies, measure, etc you want.
     
  22. RustyFN

    RustyFN Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Messages:
    3,170
    Location:
    West Virginia
    I understand all that, that's what I meant by loading in stages. The OP already has a SS press and is looking to load faster for under $300. That is when the classic turret came into the picture. I wish you could have a chance to use one, I think you would be impressed.
    Rusty
     
  23. hornadylnl

    hornadylnl Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    375
    I'm sure the lee turret is a good press. But with what I have now, I have no need for one. The only other press that I think I will ever own would be this one. http://www.natchezss.com/product.cf...prodID=LEE90859&CFID=1221820&CFTOKEN=36344902

    I don't have anything to shoot the 50 yet but I hope to someday. I'd rather have this one but couldn't justify the cost for no more than I'd shoot the 50.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=436679

    Here is the setup I have now.[​IMG]
     
  24. CZ57

    CZ57 member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,533
    Location:
    Heart of Texas
    heypete! If your not in too big of a hurry, I'd wait a bit. I'm kinda locked into REDDING, because up till now, they're the only company that seemed to understand the importance of Top-Dead-Center on a reloading press. I'm not much of a LEE fan, but the LEE Classic Turret has changed my mind a bit. It and the Classic both have TDC and the Classic Turret is as good as any out there as far as how it's designed and constructed.

    So, why wait? Because I think its only a matter of time before LEE introduces a new Progressive that will be based on the LEE Classic Turret! Or, buy the LEE Classic Turret and set it up for progressive with whatever add-ons you like best. There are enough add-ons right now to qualify it as at least semi-progressive.;)
     
  25. heypete

    heypete Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2004
    Messages:
    967
    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
    Again, thanks to all for your replies.

    As mentioned, I am fairly limited in my budget for the next year or two (saving up for a trip to Europe with the girlfriend).

    There certainly seems to be a wide variety of excellent presses out there, and I understand the logic of "buy quality first so you only cry once". As much as I'd love to have a Dillon 550/650 or similar progressive, the size and cost are simply too much for me right now (limited budget, limited space in apartment). I wish I could have a dedicated reloading room or a garage, but it's simply not possible.

    The Lee Classic Turret is looking very tempting indeed, and seems to fit my foreseeable needs for speed, size, and cost. I may have to consider progressives more closely once my current financial and living situation change.

    Cheers!
     
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