That terrible Glock trigger...

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by .38 Special, Aug 31, 2022.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. trackskippy

    trackskippy Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,875
    I dont see why you would want to try and make a Glock trigger into something equivalent to a S&W SA trigger. It would make the gun dangerous for what it is mostly used for, and simply limit its use. People cry safety rivers over the guns now, can you imagine the tidal wave you'd get with a trigger like that on one? :)

    Glocks triggers are just what they are, just like any of the others of the same type. And 99.9% of all of them are fine right out of the box, and Glock is no different.
    '
    This is simply a "personal problem" when it comes to things. Its not a gun issue. If you cant pick up any of the box stock handguns, or rifles for that matter, and shoot them reasonably well, because the trigger is a problem, I think thats a pretty good indicator that the trigger "isnt" the problem. ;)
     
    TheotherMikeG, UncleEd, Monac and 3 others like this.
  2. The Glockodile

    The Glockodile Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2020
    Messages:
    1,462
    The part of the Trigger Bar which contacts the Firing Pin - I'm weary of polishing it, not sure if it's a heat - treated part.

    I'm under the impression that this contact point needs to be (near) brittle hard.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2022
    RetiredUSNChief likes this.
  3. WrongHanded
    • Contributing Member

    WrongHanded Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2017
    Messages:
    4,135
    If the owner of a new Glock were to dry fire the gun a couple thousand times, whilst pulling the trigger smoothly, but quickly enough to not notice any roughness in the pull, they'd have a better trigger for doing so. Any rough spots would smooth out quite a lot, and the new owner would get used to the break and reset. The factory trigger would then likely suffice for defensive purposes without issue.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2022
  4. Scrod314

    Scrod314 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2020
    Messages:
    365
    I don't know if this has been anyone else's experience, but mine smoothed out as my round totals approached 200 rounds.
    It's still a Glock trigger.
    I didn't know what a nice trigger was like until a great friend of mine let me shoot his 1911 he had worked on. Having a nice trigger is huge!
     
  5. Mark_Mark
    • Contributing Member

    Mark_Mark Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2021
    Messages:
    10,491
    same! I bought a Glock, so I get a Glock trigger.
     
    RetiredUSNChief likes this.
  6. Zerodefect

    Zerodefect Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2009
    Messages:
    6,307
    Location:
    Yakutsk, Sakha Republic
    My G34.4's trigger is pretty smooth now. With a light break.

    Try putting 10,000 rounds through one. They smooth out.

    It's not the easiest trigger to master, but it's far from the hardest. Theres plenty of striker pistols that are even worse.
     
    P5 Guy, DesertFox, CDW4ME and 2 others like this.
  7. 5-SHOTS

    5-SHOTS Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,437
    Location:
    Italy
    It is not mechanically possible to transform a Glock trigger into an S&W SA trigger. In the Glock trigger there is a pre-travel that is necessary to press the firing pin safety plunger and to finish loading the striker spring. Then there's a wall with some creep because the end of the trigger bar drags down against the front face of the striker tooth and then there's the break. You can change some characteristics of the trigger and maybe the timing of the phases but I don't think you can get a SA glass-break trigger.
    Many, as a first intervention on a Glock trigger, replace the striker spring with a lighter one; I think it is a big mistake as the striker spring is the one providing the reset. So, in addition to risking light strikes, you also risk failure to reset. As I understand it, the change that gives good results is the replacement of the connector with one of a different profile.
    If you want a better trigger on a striker fired pistol, you should choose a different pistol than Glock and you should first choose a striker fired pistol in which the striker is fully cocked when you rack the slide. Maybe the Walther PPQ? The CZ P-10C? The Heckler & Koch VP9? The Grand Power Q100 new version? The Springfield Armory XD-M?
    For mechanical reasons, still none of them have a SA glass-break trigger.
     
  8. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2008
    Messages:
    9,831
    Location:
    Flatlandistan
    The officers in my agency didn’t seem to have a problem when we transitioned to Glocks in the ‘90’s.

    A few female officers stayed with revolvers when they either had difficulty racking the slides or depressing the takedown pins, but that was it. Scores actually went up with the better sights.

    I’m retired 13 years now and still have the 12lb. NY++ trigger in my G26, it’s what I’m used to.
     
  9. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Messages:
    9,635
    Location:
    Florida

    Well the came out with the trigger/spring for a reason. NYC is a big department For a carry gun, I don't mind it, I tried them in a G19
    Just makes it DA revolver pull.
     
    RetiredUSNChief likes this.
  10. RetiredUSNChief

    RetiredUSNChief Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Messages:
    11,303
    Location:
    SC (Home), VA (Work)
    I believe I understand where you're coming from.

    I have several guns with different trigger types/designs and I've shot several more. I do not have a Glock (can't get past the ugly-as-sin look) but I've shot a few, so I know what they feel like.

    I have a Colt SAA, so I know what that "breaking glass" type of feel is like.

    Every trigger design is going to have it's own feel. This is a mechanical thing, inherent in the design itself. You can alter that feel somewhat, but you are likely to never get a single action revolver trigger feel out of a semi-automatic pistol trigger of any kind because of that. You may be closer with one design over another, but it'll never be the same.

    So my Colt SAA trigger is nothing like my Colt 1991A1 trigger, which in turn is nothing like my Beretta 92FS trigger.

    My Colt 1991A1 trigger is very similar feel to my AMT Automag II trigger, as they're extremely similar in design/function.

    My Beretta 92FS trigger, a pivoting type of trigger design, doesn't feel anything at all like the pivoting trigger on any of the rifles I own.

    Which means in the real "practical" world you have to learn how each trigger design functions/feels and incorporate that into learning how to shoot the gun. Because trigger function/feel DOES affect one's ability to accurately shoot a gun.

    My personal experience with that was when I bought my Beretta 92FS not very long after I bought my Colt 1991A1. I was so all over the place with the Beretta I was questioning it as possibly defective, because I could put bullets where I wanted them all day long with my Colt. I ultimately refused to believe that Beretta would make a gun that bad, though, and knuckled down on the bench to do some dedicated, slow fire solid bench rest shooting.

    I discovered that if I concentrated on holding the sight picture as perfect as I could throughout the trigger pull, I hit point of aim every time. So it was me and not the gun. That was when I realized that the trigger design itself, being significantly different than my Colt, could actually affect my shooting. As soon as I realized this and paid closer attention to properly stroking the trigger, my shooting soon came up to par with what I expected to be capable of. I can shoot that pistol as well as my Colt as a result.

    All that said...there are good traits and bad traits to have in a trigger. It should be smooth in operation and definitely not gritty, for example. It should have a comfortable trigger weight...not so high as to be difficult to operate consistently, nor so low as to be dangerously easy to discharge the pistol. We can list lots of good characteristics, some more personal than others too.

    You will not get a single action pull feel from a semi-auto pistol trigger. You just have to realize that things will be different...but that "different" itself doesn't mean "bad". You CAN get very good trigger actions in several of the different trigger designs. And, obviously, some will just flat suck.
     
    5-SHOTS and .38 Special like this.
  11. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Messages:
    9,635
    Location:
    Florida
    I like the XDs way more than Glocks, . Glock factory trigger always seem to "bite" my finger, tried all different things can't get rid of it. Something about filing the end nub of the trigger shoe or something.
    Heck by they time a person is done messing with parts, it cost more than the gun!
    A SA XD out of the box is fine (by me)

    I still like DA/SA action triggers better.
     
    5-SHOTS likes this.
  12. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    5,590
    Thanks all.

    JFWIW, my EDC revolver is DAO. The trigger has been worked over, not to decrease weight, but to give it a smooth, even, repeatable pull. It is very useable, and nothing at all like the Glock trigger.

    Also, I use the example of the SA pull on old S&W revolvers not with the expectation that a Glock trigger can be made to mimic that, but as an example of what I consider ideal. I don't expect to get that on my Glock 29, but if I can safely head in that direction, I'd like to.

    The current trigger is about 8 pounds, and varies by about a pound. Once past the initial take-up, there's a soft "wall" followed by a long, spongy, never-the-same-twice pull, which in turn is followed by about a mile of overtravel. It's one of the worst triggers I've ever pulled, and any of you who think it's "fine" just weren't raised right. :p
     
    RetiredUSNChief and WrongHanded like this.
  13. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    5,590
    I already have the Trijicon RMR on the way. Trying to find someplace local that can cut the slide without taking six weeks. Otherwise I guess I'll be mailing it somewhere...
     
    Mark_Mark and RetiredUSNChief like this.
  14. WrongHanded
    • Contributing Member

    WrongHanded Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2017
    Messages:
    4,135
    One thing I noticed on the newer Glocks I have is that there's a strange coating on the striker sear and the drop safety plunger. I have smoothed out many surfaces on some of my guns. If you watch the video posted up thread, it will give you an idea of what could be polished to remove some of the unpleasantness from the trigger pull.

    And yes, I have smoothed/polished both sear surfaces, on more than one Glock, with no negative issues whatsoever. But all of the rough surfaces will smooth out in time (dry or live fire). Not much different than a Ruger GP100 in that respect. :D
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2022
    .38 Special likes this.
  15. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Messages:
    19,444
    Location:
    Happy Valley, UT
    Ah. For carry, I would NOT change striker spring, trigger bar, striker block spring, or trigger bar spring. I would personally try a factory glock "minus" (-) connector, and maybe polish the spots for a typical ".25-cent trigger job."

    I would NOT use a Timney or other aftermarket trigger for carry. You want all the safeties and geometries to function the way Gaston intended.

    Question: were you planning to use your carry revolvers in single-action? Because IMO that's unlikely. If you practice carry/defensive drills DA with your revolvers, your Glock will likely feel similar enough to transfer some of that skill, depending on how you set up your Glock.

    You CAN get a very nice, "glass rod" break in a Glock trigger. I shot one from Taran Tactical that was verrrry nice. But it was likely more money than a complete new handgun just for the trigger work. And I wouldn't carry it.
     
  16. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    5,590
    This makes a lot of sense to me, and I appreciate you taking the time. I think this is just what I will do.
     
    1KPerDay likes this.
  17. bdickens

    bdickens Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    2,392
    Location:
    Hockley , TX
    Get used to it.

    Like others have said: it ain't the trigger, its you.
     
  18. 5-SHOTS

    5-SHOTS Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,437
    Location:
    Italy
    This is probably the striker fired trigger which is closer to what the OP has in mind.



     
    .38 Special likes this.
  19. N555

    N555 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2022
    Messages:
    1,126
    Location:
    New Mexico and Texas panhandle
    Striker fired guns already have trouble with setting off hard primers. I wouldn't recommend going to a lighter spring.
     
    5-SHOTS and .38 Special like this.
  20. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    5,590
    Yes, in reading here and elsewhere, I have pretty much decided to ignore aftermarket triggers, spring replacement, etc. and do nothing more than try different connecters and, perhaps, a bit of polishing. If I truly cannot live with the resulting trigger, then a different gun will be next.

    Thanks all for the replies!
     
    ECVMatt, 1KPerDay, a2x4bbl and 2 others like this.
  21. N555

    N555 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2022
    Messages:
    1,126
    Location:
    New Mexico and Texas panhandle
    Yes polishing will make a pretty big difference.
    Try that first since it doesn't really cost anything.
     
    a2x4bbl, .38 Special and WrongHanded like this.
  22. a2x4bbl

    a2x4bbl Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2013
    Messages:
    315
    Location:
    Spring Hill FL
    7C846F19-AF11-4160-B1B8-24E9B19344A5.jpeg
    I bought one . It’s in this . PM me for info . Pretty divisive topic .
     
    Mark_Mark and .38 Special like this.
  23. citizenconn

    citizenconn Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2022
    Messages:
    863
    Location:
    Houston-ish, TX
    Exactly. I hope you get your Glock set up the way you want. I decided I did not like my 2 Glocks enough to spend the money upgrading them so down the road the went.
     
    5-SHOTS and .38 Special like this.
  24. Mark_Mark
    • Contributing Member

    Mark_Mark Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2021
    Messages:
    10,491
    Mail it out! worth it!
     
    a2x4bbl and .38 Special like this.
  25. N555

    N555 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2022
    Messages:
    1,126
    Location:
    New Mexico and Texas panhandle
    Yeah I have noticed that too. First thing people do when they get a glock is start replacing stuff.
     
    citizenconn likes this.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice