Quantcast

The 336 Club

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by AStone, Feb 24, 2007.

  1. frgood

    frgood Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Messages:
    118
    My 336

    My 336W (circa 2014) is my personal favorite. It has those quirks that make it even more perfect.
    The famous stock gap (1/16") is there and it is the laminate wood. The checkering is wearing a bit.

    and...

    It has put 3 hogs on the table and counting. The thing is a machine and simply works and works. I gave her a nice leather sling that provides perfect lock up when hastily drawing up on a hog in the Florida brush.

    I'm looking forward to some more bacon for the freezer next month.

    While I do have a few nice looking 1970 ad 1980 336s. This late model is my first and favorite.
     
  2. rizbunk77

    rizbunk77 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    Messages:
    289
    Fine but it's not a real Marlin. It is a copy.
     
  3. AStone

    AStone Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    24,176
    Location:
    Far N, E coast
    Welcome, frgood.
    We're glad you're here. :)

    PPTP (Please pass the pork)
     
  4. frgood

    frgood Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Messages:
    118
  5. Ratshooter

    Ratshooter Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2007
    Messages:
    3,625
    Location:
    Burleson,Texas
    Oh I don't know. As long as it was built to the plans drawn by John Marlin does it really matter who machined the steel? Most 1911s on the market aren't made by Colt but they are still built to John Browning specs.
     
  6. AStone

    AStone Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    24,176
    Location:
    Far N, E coast
    ^ Good point. I understand Remlin's QC is improving. If they can keep that up, then we're good to go.
     
  7. AStone

    AStone Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    24,176
    Location:
    Far N, E coast
    Help me decide a good price for my 336

    Yes, believe it or not, in the months since I last posted here, I've made a rather momentous decision to sell my 336. This was not a trivial decision process. I've spent months on it, and everyday -- now -- I know I've made the right decision. (I'll offer some thoughts below about the "why".)

    So I'm posting this in this thread -- er, club -- that I founded (under a different user name, since retired), then a proud new owner of my 336 (and still proud to be) -- to ask the knowledgeable members of this club to help me set a fair price for it. This is NOT a for sale post -- obviously, those are done elsewhere. And actually, I'm pretty sure I already know who the new owner will be: the step son of a good friend (and his new partner -- who's son wants the rifle). He just moved to this state, and wants a lever gun. When I told him about mine, its features, it's history -- including this club -- , he got excited, and said, "Yeah, I want it."

    This is a great arrangement, because it'll stay in "the family" (our little group is considering buying a sizeable parcel of land north of here for development of a community). They currently live less than an hour from me, and are building a shooting range on their land (easy up here with all these hills and dispersed rural population). So I suspect I'll still get a chance to shoot it some.

    So, since neither of us is rich, and I need to earn enough from sale of this rifle (and one other, far less expensive one) to buy my new rifle (see below), and get a set of scope rings for it -- I've already got a scope for it for starters -- I want to set the price at a point that's fair for both of us -- a win/win.

    Let me list the features of the rifle first, then I'll explain a bit about why I've decided to sell it. Features:
    • 2007 Marlin 336A -- JM stamp on barrel --> true Marlin
    • Wears XS Ghost Ring sights
    • Comes with scout scope mount (never installed -- I can't use one
    • action smoothed and honed by me over two weeks (see way back in this thread for the story -- which I'll share with the new owner; he loves that sort of thing
    • it's in immaculate condition, free of scratches, scuffs, dings, etc. It honestly still looks new.
    I called my two (former) gun stores on the west coast -- even though I'm no longer there, they know me -- and they recommended $450 for it. However, a friend in Florida said they're going for less there at gun shows. I haven't been able to find data for here in Maine yet.

    So, any suggestions -- posted here or via PM -- will be very appreciated.
    ____

    Finally, for any who care: why?

    Don't get me wrong: I love the gun. Deciding to let it go was tough. But my focus in rifles (and handguns, for that matter) has changed since 2007, and most markedly in the last few months. I've decided to move to a lighter, shorter all-purpose rifle in a different platform (bolt) and different caliber (5.56mm/.223). I've already picked the rifle : Ruger American Ranch Rifle. Lower recoil -- important as I get older (now 65) and retinal detachment runs in my family). It's a pound lighter -- us backpackers count ounces, let alone pounds ,-- and 16" barrel, so very short -- important for navigating the dense north woods that I haunt (if you've never tried to thread your way through a dense piece of the great north woods, you can't imagine it).

    Plus, as great as .30-30 is, it's not as precise as .223. I plan on scoping my RARR with a good Leupold. I want to work more on precision shooting now, and the RARR is reportedly a tack drive -- sub MOA at 100.

    Plus -- even though some readers will recoil with horror when I write this -- new bullet designs and powders now make .223 a very viable deer gun in states where it is allowed (yes, here) and by keeping shots 150 yds or less. (I'd post a link that convinced me of that, but I don't want to risk being OT.)

    So, that's my story. I'll appreciate any input about price for this rifle. Thanks.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2016
  8. egd

    egd Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2015
    Messages:
    644
    Location:
    Arkansas
    I just saw this thread, and no I didn't go back and read it all so someone else may have posted something similar. But I have a 1970 centennial model 336. It has a round insignia in the stock and a gold trigger. I used to hunt with it before I started bowhunting so it hasn't been fired more than 6-8 times since about '72-73. It's got some scratches and wear places on the stock.
    But this was the first gun I bought with "my" money I earned from a real job. If I remember right (big if), I got some kind of a discount thru work (Krogers) and I paid $69.95. I was probably 20-21 years old then.
     
  9. Space Ghost

    Space Ghost Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2016
    Messages:
    104
    Location:
    Indiana
    I also just found this thread. Then again, I basically just found this forum. I plan to go back a read all the back posts when I have time. I am a 336 owner. It's newer Remlin, but it shoots fine, and I've had zero problems with it. I'm not a name brand snob most of the time. I will agree that recoil is stout, but hey, it's to be expected in a lever or bolt gun as there is nothing in the action moving to help mitigate it. I am very much an AR kinda guy, but also to be expected, I carried one in the army for 28 years. I am planing to get the action of my 336 smoothed up a bit, shorten it and put some better sights on it. This rifle is going to be my "rugged but simple" gun. Being a lever gun, it is also desirable in today's political climate. With all the threats to our gun rights, it will be one of the last types they go after. I also just love the small slim receiver of a lever gun. They are so easy to carry around all day long one handed. I never sling a gun unless I need both hands for other things at the time.
     
  10. egd

    egd Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2015
    Messages:
    644
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Space Ghost, you make a point I have recently noticed. I just bought my first AR type gun-er,rifle-, a 9mm colt pcc, and I find there's no good place to carry it like on a "regular" rifle. The balance point is right at the fattest point of the gun. I like to carry guns like the 336 in the middle. I love shooting the AR, just not carrying it.
     
  11. Space Ghost

    Space Ghost Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2016
    Messages:
    104
    Location:
    Indiana
    When I first went in, we used the M16A1. You could grab it right at the delta ring and it balanced pretty well. Not 336 well, but pretty well.
     
  12. JustsayMo

    JustsayMo Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    1,450
    Location:
    the Evergreen State
    Nem, er Dr., er AStone... ah, Sir.

    I understand and respect your decision though as you know I can't help throwing a few more cents at it. To keep it on topic I will compare the venerable Marlin 336 to the 223 Ruger American and add another wrinkle, the 300 Blackout Ranch Rifle.

    IF you didn't have the potential health risk to your eyes and were a reloader I believe I could make a solid case for retaining the Marlin. It is generally faster to cycle a levergun than a bolt from the shoulder though the difference for those bothering to practice is negligible. The Marlin is more packable. Macbride, in his classic, A Rifleman Went to War muses about making a battle rifle in a battle caliber as "handy" as a levergun. The slim profile and balance make it much easier to carry in the field which is 99.99% of the time is what is actually going on. Reloaders can make the 30-30 do all sort so things the 223 can't - Heavy bullets mild to wild, light (115 gr varmint exploders) that the 223 can just do a bit over half the weight. Subsonic light and heavy, no problem with the 30-30.

    223 offers velocity, excellent accuracy, popularity rivaling 30-30 and relatively inexpensive commercial ammo. It's zippy, obnoxiously loud, especially in shorter barrels and based on personal anecdotal evidence, less impressive on game than its larger diameter brethren.

    Now the 300 Blackout Ruger Ranch Rifle does intrigue, almost bought the first one I saw. Commercially available light fast bullets, to heavy subsonics. Not quite as economical as the 223 but far more versatile. Reloaders can expand that versatility even farther, much farther - another topic. 223 brass is readily available, inexpensive and easily converted to 300 Blackout. Accuracy is on par with 223 and is MUCH more impressive on game, especially at range. 223 is very impressive on small game and works on deer sized critters to a certain point but the 30 caliber slug doesn't shrink and way our penetrates the 223, which is second only to accuracy when shooting critters.

    This opinion is based on personal experience, "energy" is trumped by penetration (two holes) on critters like Bears and Elk. Lots of keyboard commandos talk about "shock" but I doubt very many of them have tracked a wounded bear in the steep-thick-dark, wishing they were packing something bigger. Big energy numbers do NOT equate to dead-right-there. Rapid exsanguination = short trails and the need for a sharp knife.

    I LOVE bolt guns with peep sights. The Ruger Scout is one of my favorites as are the 77/357 and 77/22 with NECG peep sights. Light, handy and versatile. The 77/357 is proving to be a favorite of mine due to it's versatility and compatibility with my revolvers.

    In conclusion, only you can make the call. My opinions are worth exactly what you pay for them... nothing.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2016
  13. AStone

    AStone Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    24,176
    Location:
    Far N, E coast
    :D :cool:

    Dr. Mo, Sir. You have been one of the stalwart members of this club since it's inception, offering exceptional advice and insight, based in real experience. (I still hope we meet someday. I know it's a long ways to Maine from there, but jet travel is not expensive. ;) )

    Therefore, I'm particularly delighted to read your response. As always, it's spot on.

    And -- as luck and fate would have it -- .300 BO is one motivation (among several) driving me toward this decision. Let me explain. I'm going to buy the first RARR in .5.56/.223 (yes, truly chambered in 5.56mm), but the RARR is also available in <drum roll> .300 BO.

    So, down the road, should I decide to go after moose in the N part of this state, I'll likely do it with that rnd. ;)

    As always, my friend, we're on the same page. :cool:

    As I've said above, .30-30 is a venerable, tried and true caliber.
    Marlin 336, likewise. I'm really glad mine is going to be owned by a
    young man capable of using it well (he's around 6'7", from Colorado).
     
  14. Space Ghost

    Space Ghost Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2016
    Messages:
    104
    Location:
    Indiana
    JustsayMo, I LOVE bolt guns with peep sights too. Now the Lee Enfield #4 mk1, there is a proper rifle. Smooth action and a 10 round mag to boot. They're getting harder to find, but I'm planing a scout rifle build of one if I ever do fine one. If there was one gun I ever had regrets for selling, it was my Enfield.
     
  15. Ratshooter

    Ratshooter Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2007
    Messages:
    3,625
    Location:
    Burleson,Texas
    Well this is interesting. You want to sell your 30-30 because its too long by 4" over the ruger american and the woods you walk in are so wooly that 4" less barrel makes a big difference in portability. But with the ruger you need to add a scope that will add around 13oz but the marlin with open sights would be too heavy. If your woods are so dense then why do you need a scope? If the woods are that thick how will you find an open area for a 100-150 yard shot? And a 223 bullet at 2800 to 3100 fps will survive the slightest touch of a branch or leaf?

    I don't know. You may want to hunt moose and will use a 300 BO. That sounds like a far better choice for your hairy woods. Me, I would keep the 30-30 and handload lighter bullets like a 125gr at around 2000fps and go with that. I think we have already talked about 125gr bullets before. That load shouldn't hurt your eyes with recoil.

    I helped a very small 16 year old girl on a youth hunt by loading a Remington model 7, the original version with an 18" barrel and walnut stock and I loaded Sierra 120gr soft points to about 2600fps and she had no problem killing four deer with that gun. It doesn't kick anymore than a 243. Plus I can turn it up with a 150gr bullet at about 2750 and that should kill any moose you want to kill. Just don't stretch the range. 200 yards would be my limit.

    Anyway good luck with your choice. I hope its all you want it to be. And I would buy a ruger compact before the american rifle just to avoid so much plastic.
     
  16. AStone

    AStone Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    24,176
    Location:
    Far N, E coast
    It seems that we may be talking past one another here. The reasons for me letting go of the 336 in .30-30 are complex, somewhat addressed above, but apparently not sufficiently. It's OK. No more time to deal with it now -- I'm in the process of preparing for a complex move further north (much closer to my beloved north country). I'm confident of my decision -- I've thought the rifle transition through thoroughly for months, and talked with several advisors extensively about it, all of whom think it's the right thing to do.

    Just one point re scope: if I'd kept the 336, I was planning to scope it with a low power, maybe even a fixed power, like 2.5X. I like the optics better now with my aging eyes. And the RARR has no stock sights, so scoping it is required for me. But I've got a great lightweight, Leupold 2-7X that'll go on it. In the woods, it'll be dialed to 2X. For the occasional field or cut zone, I can dial it up. I was also planning to cut the 336 down to 16.5" for the same reason -- I like shorter rifles. Now, I won't do that. So all told, I'm going to wind up with a shorter, lighter, scoped rifle with adequate power for my needs. I'm good with that.

    My biggest reason for posting this was to ask advice on a fair price for the 336. (Maybe I should have just left out the reasons I'm selling it -- ).

    No one has advice on that? I wanted to start here in this club first, but I'll bet I know another forum where I'm also a member that will have some. Still, I welcome advice here.
     
  17. Airgead

    Airgead Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Messages:
    181
    Location:
    Ohio, USA
    Just my opinion, but $450 is probably at the top asking end and you will likely settle for less. Most I've seen recently at shows in PA and OH are in the $300s.
     
  18. Ratshooter

    Ratshooter Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2007
    Messages:
    3,625
    Location:
    Burleson,Texas
    Astone it sounds like you have given it a lot of thought. I guess my deep respect for the 336 and the 30wcf round may have clouded my response a bit. So if the bolt gun works better for you then go for it.

    So when you get to where you are going post some pics of your new home and of course your new rifle. And a dead moose would be OK too.

    As to the rifle price if the rifle is clean without too many scratches then I would ask between $300 to $400. I wouldn't pay more than $400 for one that was like new.
     
    adcoch1 likes this.
  19. AStone

    AStone Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    24,176
    Location:
    Far N, E coast
    May I remind you all that this rifle wears XS Ghost Rings and comes with an XS scout scope mount -- both of which the buyer wants. Total price for that gear new on Midway is $150. I think that probably adds $75 -- $100 to the price. (If they buyer didn't want those, I could sell them independently for that much.)

    If I can get $450 for the whole package -- whether together or separate -- I'll be a happy camper. ;)
     
  20. tubeshooter

    tubeshooter Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    1,457
    Unfortunately, accessories are almost meaningless. Even if your projected buyer "wants" them.

    If you feel can do better selling things separately - then do so.



    A buyer who cares about the whole JM-vs-REP proof marking and what not might give you $450 or even a tad more. Or, you could be waiting a long time. Depends on how bad you want to sell it, and how fast. Although I would prefer an older 336 if I was in the market, I don't see spending over $400 for one under all but the most extreme circumstances. If your gun is not collectible and you get a $400 offer, I would say take the money and run.
     
  21. Airgead

    Airgead Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Messages:
    181
    Location:
    Ohio, USA
    I agree; if you're trying to maximize the value then consider parting it out. The $300s Marlins I referred to almost all had some sort of 4x32 scope of them. In my limited experience, it sounds you're looking for a buyer that wants a Marlin that new (because most Marlins I hear people talk about are 50s-70s era) and wants your Ghost Rings. Most people would be looking for a 3x or 4x scope, either with the gun or as an add-on. You can try offering it as a package at $450, specifically making a point about the Ghost Rings. But I think you're going to sit on it until the right buyer comes along. Depends on how long you're willing to wait on the right buyer. My $0.02.
     
  22. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    3,379
    Location:
    Justin, TX
  23. AStone

    AStone Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    24,176
    Location:
    Far N, E coast
    Thanks for continued input.

    To remind readers -- because some missed this point -- I already have a buyer, a friend who is interested in the ghost rings, and understands they are value added -- at least for him. He's also interested in the scout scope mount.

    I'm really not trying to max the price. I want to identify a price that's fair for both of us. Several people on three forums are suggesting that $450 is a sweet spot for both, given that my friend wants the GR's and the scout scope mount. But I'll talk it over with him; I'll adjust the price if he can't do 450.
     
  24. AStone

    AStone Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    24,176
    Location:
    Far N, E coast
    Oh, and I forgot something that sweetens the deal. I've got about 35 - 40 rounds of ammo that I'm throwing in with the gun. It's Federal Power Shok in 150 and 170 gr, and Hornady Leverevolution in 160. That's about $35 - $40 worth. All and all, I think this is a fair price.
     
  25. Airgead

    Airgead Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Messages:
    181
    Location:
    Ohio, USA
    I personally glossed over the buyer part in your first post on this subject and thought it was more about the land. Since you have a buyer who is interested in your precise setup and likely isn't going to haggle you down to your bones then $450 is probably a fair price to offer at. Like I said though, I think that's a premium price. But on the flip side, the buyer is getting a rifle that he knows has been well cared for and that's hard to price but goes in your favor. I personally would pay more - within reason - for a gun from a friend that I know takes care of their guns.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2016
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice