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The 336 Club

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by AStone, Feb 24, 2007.

  1. JustsayMo

    JustsayMo Member

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    For general purpose, the ecconomy and versatility of the 357 Mag is the pistol caliber version of the 30-30. If you don't handload then the 38/357 is an even better choice due to the wide variety of inexpensive ammo readily available for it. The 357's performance is much enhanced (velocity and accuracy) in a rifle, it's easy and enjoyable to shoot.

    There are better cartridges for specific tasks but when consideration is given to weight and cost of the ammo and the capability to take a wide spectrum of game, the 38/357 really shines. In a 16-20" barrel it is one of the handiest long guns around.

    The 1894 in 357 is an EXCELLENT youth or newbie shooter rifle. It doesn't take much ammo or time before the shooter becomes quite proficient and comfortable with it. A skilled hunter would not be limited by it either.

    My only complaint about my 1894 in 38/357 was that it wouldn't reliably feed SWC style bullets. Neither does my 44 but my 45 Colt eats anything.

    If hunting is the primary goal I would rather have the 44 mag. For a few years it was my go to deer rifle. Now it is serving as a backup. http://www.grovestreet.com/jsp/onepic.jsp?id=1066975 and is a favorite at our hunting camp. It too is a good general purpose rifle but ammo is heavier and more expensive comparitively. The slight improvement in performance doesn't offset the advantages of the 357 enough IMHO for the "one rifle" scenario.

    If I could only have one center fire lever action it would be a 30-30. The 357 is a close second though. Luckily I don't have to make that choice and I can enjoy dabbling with a variety of calibers using this excellent platform. I'd love to find one in 22 Mag and 32 H&R Mag when I have money in my pocket... A 444 would be nice too... Oh and the...
     
  2. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Amen.
     
  3. Z_Infidel

    Z_Infidel Member

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    AWMP: I've owned both a 1894C and 1894 Cowboy in .357 Mag and they were both very nice rifles. The 1894C is shorter, lighter, and handier whereas the Cowboy has a heavier octagon barrel which helps with keeping steady on target. I had XS Gost Ring sights mounted on the 1894C and liked that configuration a lot (I also use them on my 336 rifles). I couldn't bring myself to swap out the semi-buckhorns on the Cowboy because it would have ruined the looks of the gun.

    Both of them were accurate, with a slight edge going to the Cowboy. I think you should base your decision on the difference in handling characteristics and the type of sights you want to use. Beyond that, either is a fine choice.
     
  4. Digital Falcon

    Digital Falcon Member

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    JOY and Jubilation! :D :D :D :D

    My 336 is back from the factory. As I had hopped the 30 day estimate was grossly over done. I must get it to a range soon. The only one I have access too is only 25 yards but it will still let me get a feel for it.

    Also I am promising all that the ever feared Dremel will not be allowed near the rifle. :uhoh:
     
  5. JustsayMo

    JustsayMo Member

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    35 Remington 336

    I'm being tempted by a 336 in 35 Remington. :uhoh:

    New caliber to me. Preliminary research indicates it shares the virtues of the 30-30 in versatility and portability departments. It proportedly (slightly) exceeds it in hunting performance and is better a more desireable Elk round. The 30-30 looks like it is the clear winner when it comes to ecconomy and availability of ammo.

    Still, I'm very tempted :scrutiny: :cool:

    Other random considerations.

    -My 30-30 bullets can be used with my 30-06. The 35 Rem could use 38/357 bullets for reduced/plinking/ecconomical/quieter shooting. :) I wonder if they shoot as well as a cast bullet over pistol powder in the 30-30?...

    -I get a lot of 30-30 brass for free from guys that don't reload. I don't know a 35 Remington shooter that doesn't reload... Getting enough brass (as if one can ever have enough) could be mighty expensive.

    -Accuracy?? Of the three 30-30's I've had my hands on, all were accurate <1-1/2" @ 100 yards with their prefered ammo. What will the 35 Rem do in a 336?

    -Looks like some of the powders I use for 30-30 and 45-70 are among those good in the 35 Remington.

    -Can one really have too many Marlins? I like Nem's Tool Kit/one gun and know how to use it philosphy but I don't think I have his displine. I can't help wondering what I might discover if I take that trail. Darn it. A 336 in 35 Rem wasn't even on my radar. This thread is proving expensive!
     
  6. Brassman

    Brassman Member

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    Mo,
    I load for my 336 in 35 Rem. I also use the same bullets I use for .38sp and .357mag. Mine likes the 158gr LSWC. The powder is IMR 4064. I don't use pistol powder, but I guess that could be worked out if you wanted to use some.

    Mine shoots really good groups, better than my .30-30 at 25 yards. The only time I ever use factory 35 Rem. is at the end of a range session when I launch a copper jacketed bullet through the barrel to clean out any lead fouling in the rifling.
     
  7. Gustav

    Gustav Member

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    Marlin 336 an American classic have owned a couple in .30-30 and a Guide gun in .45-70 does that count?
    Definately a fan here, side ejection easy scope mounting,classic lines and good balance and pointability,rock solid dependable easy to get parts for and a proven design.:)
    Hard times forced me to sell my three.:banghead:
    The great thing about the 336 .30-30 is one can always be found for sale usually at a good price.:D
    The guide gun however I may not be able to find so easy as I heard a rumor that ported one are no longer being made if so someone please let me know?
    Yes I am a faithfull follower of the church of Marlin I sing its praises and am in the congregation,count me in.:neener:
    One day soon I will find the right one and fill a void in the collection.
     
  8. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Gustav, welcome. Glad you've joined us.

    [QUOTE='Mo]I like Nem's Tool Kit/one gun and know how to use it philosophy but I don't think I have his discipline.[/QUOTE]'Mo, I'm not entirely sure that I've got the discipline either :rolleyes: ... it's a goal, not a given.

    A .35 Rem is not on my list, but that 1895G has muscled its way onto the list.
     
  9. Cato the Younger

    Cato the Younger Member

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    I just joined the club

    Picked up a 336W with gunsack, and a box of 30-30 170 gr for $303 out the door! It was barely used- I had the owner of the shop clean the barrel and looked down it- the lands were nice and sharp! I like the hooded front bead sight also- I can't wait to try this on pigs!
     
  10. Cato the Younger

    Cato the Younger Member

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    I just joined the club

    double post
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2007
  11. Digital Falcon

    Digital Falcon Member

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    No range time yet, Tuesday hopefully. Though I do have some observations: 1. This rifle seems to have a similar problem to CrakerJim in that sometimes the cartridges hang in the magazine. I may have to have a smith look at it after all. 2. The magazine springs seems stiff to me. I guess I will either get used to it or the spring will soften with time, or both. 3. The rear sight is set to the right quite a bit so I am prepared to need to move it back to the left if need be. 4. Being new to lever actions I do not know if the action is overly stiff, but I think it could use a little smoothing.


    Other than all that I am still so happy to have it back in my hands.
     
  12. CrackerJim

    CrackerJim Member

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    Falcon,

    It would be interesting to know if yours works fine when being fired as mine does. I've put off taking it to the gunsmith to see if it will not only continue to work fine when fired but if it improves (basically through wear) on the non fire cycling.

    One of the nice things about proving the second is that I've got to shoot it a bunch to put the wear on it! :D

    Good luck,

    Jim
     
  13. AStone

    AStone Member

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    It's Friday night.
    (Actually, Saturday morning,
    but at least I'm finished with "work",
    and enjoying the "weekend".)

    After another week from hell at work
    (why did I ever think that
    owning my own business was a good idea? :confused: :what: )

    It's a pleasure to come here
    and read about the 336.

    Mine is only 9' away.
    I've got two rnds of Federal Fusion (150's)
    and two rnds of Federal Hydrashoks (also 150's)
    in my vest pocket.

    But ... wait... is there
    any substantive difference
    in those rnds?

    Hypothesis: No.

    Hypothesis: It's more about marketing
    than anything else.

    I'm putting up a five spot
    that either one would put down a deer
    (let alone a human intruder in a SD situation)
    with equal force.

    Opinions?

    In any case,
    I like my 336.

    Nem-336
     
  14. JustsayMo

    JustsayMo Member

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    Nem wrote: "But ... wait... is there
    any substantive difference
    in those rnds?"

    Performance difference is probably minimal when the shot is properly placed. The "substantive difference" might only be which shoots better in your rifle. Point of impact *might* not be the same for both cartridges or one is very inaccurate, thus it is possible that one of the cartridges is inferior.

    My first 336 would NOT shoot 170g Remington CoreLokts. The "groups" weren't even minute of deer at 50 yards. In frustration its previous owner sold it to me along with 5 boxes of the stuff at a price I couldn't resist. I worked up some handloads for it that would shoot sub 1-1/2" at 100 yards and the Corelokts fed the Winchester 94 (loves em).
     
  15. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Good points, Mo.

    I remember similar advice from others in this (or other?) threads: that rifles in general (including our 336s) can be pretty finicky when it comes to rnds.

    So that leads to another question related more to sights. This may be a silly question (could be that I'm just up and haven't had coffee yet).

    (Background) Here I've got this new 336 with less than 100 rnds through it so far. I've put XS GR on it. [I still haven't even had the time - see "work week from hell", above - to call XS to get that taller front post that will hopefully remedy the fact that my "groups" (such as they are so far) are 6-8" high. :eek: ]

    So, here's my question: once I get the new post put on, and get groups at least in the general area of the bullseye, will I be able to be consistent enough with GR sights at 50 yds to be able to know which rnds my rifle likes?

    That is, if I had a scope on it (in the plans but not yet), I know that I can put it in a bench rest, put the X-hairs on target, and be consistent.

    With GR's, I can't do that. I'm not sure that I trust my consistency with them given that they're new to me AND the rifle is new to me.

    So, how am I going to know whether poor groups are due to my inconsistent use of GRs, or rnds that my rifle doesn't like or both? :confused:

    Seems like a catch 22.

    Any advice?

    Nem
     
  16. CrackerJim

    CrackerJim Member

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    What I would do is get set up on the bench with the front site centered in the ring and on target (if target stand is big enough) or on the bottom of the target if shooting high. As long as you bench rest with the same site picture each time, the group you get will be the ammo.

    Good luck,

    Jim
     
  17. JustsayMo

    JustsayMo Member

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    Options

    Nem,

    If the XS ring is threaded, I would consider getting a smaller aperture for target work It makes it easier to be accurate. Take the aperture out or find one ~.096" + or - for field work. The GR sights, like the opens takes some trigger time to to develop marksmanship. They are great for quick sight aquisition but the level of precision is completely based on the skill of the marksman. Few guys really shoot enough to be proficient iron sights.

    You could temporarily scope the 336, find the load that shoots best and then reinstall and practice to duplicate the accuracy with the GR sights.

    Coaching will speed the process. Also having someone who is a good shot shoot your rifle goes a long way toward taking out the variables.

    A 22lr configured the same as your 336 (your 39 would be ideal) will make practice a lot more affordable. For about the price of 100 rounds of 30-30 ammo you can buy a peep sight for the 39 and end up saving yourself some big $$ in the long run. Unscrew the aperture and you have a defacto GR sight. I almost always finish my range session with a 22lr (Mountie & Single Six) It lets me get the repetitions and work on follow through.

    Reloading won't save you money because you'll still shoot as much as you can afford. You'll just be shooting more for that same money... then factory ammo will never be the same either... you'll only buy the brands with the best brass regardless of how well the ammo shoots in your rifle...

    Groups are more important than bullseyes. It pays to plink too. Becoming a rifleman (and the 336 is a rifleman's rifle) means using it in the venue for which it was designed. Unknown distances in field positions will sharpen those skills. The range is great for repititions but there is no substitute for field experience.
     
  18. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Jim and Mo',

    Great advice.

    Thanks mucho.
     
  19. Digital Falcon

    Digital Falcon Member

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    Why a 3D rendering program, and a bored Falcon are bad things to mix:

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Z_Infidel

    Z_Infidel Member

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    Nem, you've been given some sound advice already but I'll throw mine in. If you have the time, the best way to see which ammo shoots best in your rifle is to mount a traditional scope on it and test for consistent accuracy from the bench. On the other hand, YES you can shoot well enough with the XS ghost ring sights at 50 yards to get good groups. But keep in mind that 50 yards is not the best distance at which to zero a .30-30. I would start with getting a good zero at 25 yards, then re-zero at 100 yards. That is, unless you are certain almost all of your shooting will be done at 50 yards or so. I have my 336C zero set for general shooting at 100 yards, and it is dead on at 25. I know how to adjust a little for ranges in between, but really you don't need to worry about it very much at such close range.

    For me, the lever gun is all about practical accuracy for real-world shooting. I just want to be able to hit what I'm aiming at within the practical effective range of my rifle (factoring in the type of sights being used) and my shooting skills.
     
  21. OldWolf

    OldWolf Member

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    Neat Club!

    I have 3 of them. A 1948 and 1967 336 and an 1895.
     
  22. NWAttorney

    NWAttorney Member

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    TEOTWAWKI/SHTF Gun. How about a Lever Action 30/30?

    Hey you lever-action people. I've posted a question on the general list under: "TEOTWAWKI/SHTF Gun. How about a Lever Action 30/30? "

    You all would probably best be able to speak to this question, so if I could get some of you to migrate over to that thread just for a second I would appreciate it.

    NWAttorney.
     
  23. NWAttorney

    NWAttorney Member

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    TEOTWAWKI/SHTF Gun. How about a Lever Action 30/30?

    Somebody said this might have already been discussed elsewhere and might now be a dead thread. If so, and any of you know were that thread is? (if it can still be viewed)?
     
  24. Sniper X

    Sniper X Member

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    Hey Old Wolf, is your 1967 336 a 336RC? I have a 1968 model and it is the RC, as in "regular carbine". And, does your serial start with AC?
     
  25. OldWolf

    OldWolf Member

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    Sniper X,

    Yes, both are RC models.

    The '48 prefix is E and the '67 is AC.
     

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