Quantcast

The better “Colt”.

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by RWMC, Apr 28, 2020.

  1. RWMC

    RWMC Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    325
    Location:
    "It's not Heaven....it's Iowa"
    Which is the better 1860 Army; the Colt Blackpowder series or the Colt signature series?
    Thanks for your input!
     
  2. 45 Dragoon

    45 Dragoon Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2013
    Messages:
    1,700
    The original one! The two mentioned are lesser copies of the original. For instance:

    > The original had a correctly configured bolt (thin left arm) the copies (mentioned) don't.
    > The combination spring was correct in the originals, made opposite in the copies
    > The copies have short arbors, the originals didn't.

    Just that alone is enough to be a vast difference from an excellent revolver (made as designed) compared to a couple of copies apparently meant for collecting.
    Of course, this is just my opinion . . .

    Mike
     
    RWMC likes this.
  3. RWMC

    RWMC Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    325
    Location:
    "It's not Heaven....it's Iowa"
    Thanks Mike.
    Since an original is not a financial option for me ( even with money from my rich Uncle Donald! ) what about the quality of the “made in Belgium” 1860 Army copy? Thanks.
     
  4. 45 Dragoon

    45 Dragoon Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2013
    Messages:
    1,700
    Lol!!! I hear ya!! Well, I've never worked on one but all reports seem to say they are the best copies ever done! I'd like to take a peek at one just to compare!! If you can get one, I'd go out on a limb and say that would probably be best!!
    BTW, I'm not putting down collecting in any way!! I know some collectors and I've been a collector (of other things) myself!! I totally understand that animal. My perspective on this subject is purely from a functionality position. What I have to do to these (named) copies is a much bigger scope than a modern made Uberti or Pietta!! (Yes, they are that much better!!!) Of course the revolvers mentioned were made 40-50 yrs ago and the parts reflect (sadly) that time period. Never the less, they can all be brought to be an unbelievable state of precision (enough to easily rival your favorite S.A. revolver)!

    Good luck RWMC!
    Mike
     
    woodnbow likes this.
  5. RWMC

    RWMC Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    325
    Location:
    "It's not Heaven....it's Iowa"
    Thanks Mike!
     
  6. woodnbow
    • Contributing Member

    woodnbow Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    436
    I’m not Mike but
    I’ve owned at least a half dozen of the Centaure revolvers and in my opinion they’re a mixed bag. One was excellent and nearly perfect in the box and I should never have sold it. The rest ranged from as good as the best uberti guns in fit finish and action, to poorly fitted and finished. If I found one in person and it checked out, I would consider owning another. I’d never buy one online without a generous return policy.
     
  7. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    18,659
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    What rings in my brain is Jay Strite, among others, telling me that the newer Uberti's are better guns than the 2nd and 3rd generation Colt's. If I wanted the best "Colt" percussion pistol available, I'd buy a brand new Uberti, get it professionally tuned and send it to Turnbull for proper finishes.
     
  8. 45 Dragoon

    45 Dragoon Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2013
    Messages:
    1,700
    CraigC, you're exactly right! Jay told you the truth!! Today's Uberti copies are the best appointed revolvers available! The action parts are something Sam Colt would have had a fit over (very impressive). A corrected and "tuned" version of a current production offering would be the "best" Colt (other than an excellent 1st Gen.!)
    Of the 2 offerings mentioned by the OP, one is about as good as the other . . . they have antiquated "modern" parts (absolutely suck!!) and are best as "display" pieces. On the other hand, they can be made into excellent shooters but they require the most work.
    I've also heard the same thing that Woodnbow posted as for the Belgian copies. Some are, some aren't. (Don't get the "aren't" ones!!!)

    Mike
     
    woodnbow and CraigC like this.
  9. arcticap

    arcticap Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2005
    Messages:
    7,196
    Location:
    Central Connecticut
    45 Dragoon likes this.
  10. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    18,659
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    The USFA would be on par with what I suggested but cost a hell of a lot more with the current collector premiums attached to them. They'll probably cost about what I have in my engraved, charcoal blued, ivory stocked Open Top.
     
    krinko, 45 Dragoon and arcticap like this.
  11. TheOutlawKid

    TheOutlawKid Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2018
    Messages:
    622
    Ive never worked on an uberti...but ive worked quite a few newer model piettas...all 2016 and up and i find their parts are pretty dang good quality. Theyre definately better than the older models from the 80s and 90s that i checked out...and seem to get better the newer they are. Of course after i tune the guns and slick them up they do a whole lot better...but i find their parts to be of quality and able to be made into even better parts with a bit of fine tuning. Im sure working on an uberti is similar...im just trying to imagine how they can be of better quality. Ill take mikes word for it tho... Hes mentored me on quite a few things helping me a long the way and has never steered me wrong.
     
    bannockburn and 45 Dragoon like this.
  12. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    18,659
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    For guns made in the last several years since Pietta got their quality out of the gutter, I would rate them about equal.
     
    bannockburn, 45 Dragoon and woodnbow like this.
  13. woodnbow
    • Contributing Member

    woodnbow Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    436
    But that loading lever!! *Egads!* and the backstrap!! Double *Egads!* :barf:
     
  14. 45 Dragoon

    45 Dragoon Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2013
    Messages:
    1,700
    Arcticap, the early USFA's were Uberti parts but I've never seen the insides of one. I don't know if the action parts were cleaned up or left stock. That would be early '90s (still sucky parts era!). Uberti Cattleman series of the last dozen yrs or so have excellent action parts just as the cap guns have.

    Outlawkid, the Pietta parts are just modern copies of the 80's parts they had. Probably the best part in them is the combination spring but only because it is actually a new/better spring. The bolt arms are the same thickness. Compare the left bolt arm of the Pietta to that of the Uberti. The Uberti hands are executed very nicely and are excellent for setting up with a frame mounted spring (Ruger style). Most of the Uberti mainsprings of today rarely need any attention. When done with the actions and conversion to coils they typically allow a 4lb. hammer draw or even less. The trigger pull weight is dialed in with the coil trigger spring.

    So, as CraigC pointed out, probably the best Colt S.A. copy would be the USFA or even today the Standard Arms version (both rather expensive but I would never say not to buy one!!).

    Mike
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2020
    jdavis123 and arcticap like this.
  15. TheOutlawKid

    TheOutlawKid Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2018
    Messages:
    622

    Lol mr.woodnbow , i actually change the plunger over to uberti ones haha. All my 1851s and 1861s havw uberti plungers. They are a direct fit for 1861 but on 1851s u gotta widen the plunger hole just a hair. And their ugly back strap flare era is over and done with. I thought it was ugly too :p
     
    woodnbow likes this.
  16. Rebel Dave

    Rebel Dave Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Burlington Wis
    Of all my Pietta C & B revolvers, the ones made since 2014 are the best. Pietta changed over to all CNC machining, and also they started making all thier own parts, instead of farming them out. This investment has paid off for them.
    My later model Ubertis are of excellent quaity also, except for the arbors being still to short.

    Dave
     
  17. drobs

    drobs Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2017
    Messages:
    1,076
    Location:
    Missouri
    Pietta for me:

    [​IMG]
     
    bannockburn, ruger357, CraigC and 4 others like this.
  18. TheOutlawKid

    TheOutlawKid Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2018
    Messages:
    622
    Im a pietta man myself
     
    drobs likes this.
  19. woodnbow
    • Contributing Member

    woodnbow Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    436
    I set up a half dozen bowling pins at 100 yards today and went after them with a full size 2nd gen. 1860 Army and a 5.5” 2nd gen... out of 8 or 9 cylinders of round ball over 35 grains of 3f I cleared the half dozen once. Had them worried a few times too. Long range gunning is a hoot! I fired a cylinder or two at a rock on the canyon wall too, it’s at least 200 yards away but downhill from my platform so I’m not holding over an excessive amount. It’s been pretty dry lately makes it easy to walk the rounds onto the target.
     
    drobs, TheOutlawKid and arcticap like this.
  20. ruger357

    ruger357 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    1,633
    Location:
    RI
    Exactamongo to the Piettas
     
  21. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    21,372
    drobs
    I second that notion though I still like my Gen.3 Colt Model 1860!
    A0d5wpn.jpg
    xbjGj5k.jpg
     
    Tommygunn and drobs like this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice