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The conservative crack up

Discussion in 'Legal' started by rick_reno, Oct 12, 2005.

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  1. rick_reno

    rick_reno member

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    "Blame the Administation" - that's a new one. This article has a number of hot buttons mentioned; the Miers mess, immigration, deficits, etc.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9651882/

    WASHINGTON - President George W. Bush may have no military exit strategy for Iraq, but the “neocons” who convinced him to go to war there have developed one of their own — a political one: Blame the Administration.

    Their neo-Wilsonian theory is correct, they insist, but the execution was botched by a Bush team that has turned out to be incompetent, crony-filled, corrupt, unimaginative and weak over a wide range of issues.

    The flight of the neocons — just read a recent Weekly Standard to see what I am talking about — is one of only many indications that the long-predicted “conservative crackup” is at hand.

    The “movement” – that began 50 years ago with the founding of Bill Buckley’s National Review; that had its coming of age in the Reagan Years; that reached its zenith with Bush’s victory in 2000 — is falling apart at the seams.

    In 1973, Karl Rove met George W. Bush, and became the R2D2 and Luke Skywalker of Republican politics. At first, neither was plugged into “The Force” — the conservative movement. But over the years they learned how to use its power.

    By the time Bush was in his second term as governor, laying the groundwork for his presidential run, he and Rove had gathered all of the often competing and sometimes contradictory strains of conservatism into one light beam. You could tell by the people they brought to Austin.

    To tie down the religious conservatives, they nudged John Ashcroft out of the race and conducted a literal laying on of hands at the governor’s mansion with leaders such as James Dobson.

    For the libertarian anti-tax crowd, they brought in certified supply-sider Larry Lindsey as the top economic advisor.

    For the traditional war hawks they brought in Paul Wolfowitz, among others, go get Bush up to speed on the world.

    For the traditional corporate types – well, Bush had that taken care of on his own.

    But now all the constituent parts are — for various reasons — going their own way. Here's a checklist:

    Religious conservatives
    The Harriet Miers nomination was the final insult. Religious conservatives have an inferiority complex in the Republican Party. In an interesting way, it’s the same attitude that many African-Americans have had toward the Democratic Party over the years. They think that the Big Boys want their votes but not their presence or their full participation.

    And what really frosts the religious types is that Bush evidently feels that he can only satisfy them by stealth — by nominating someone with absolutely no paper trail. It’s an affront. And even though Dr. Dobson is on board — having been cajoled aboard by Rove — I don’t sense that there is much enthusiasm for the enterprise out in Colorado Springs.

    I expect that any GOP 2008 hopeful who wants evangelical support — people like Sam Brownback, Rick Santorum and maybe even George Allen — will vote against Miers's confirmation in the Senate.

    Corporate CEOs
    For them, Bush’s handling of Katrina was, and remains, a mortal embarrassment to their class, which Bush is supposed to have represented — at least to some extent.

    These are people who believe in the Faith of Management — in anticipating problems and moving mass organizations. They also like to think of themselves as having a social conscience. And even if they don’t, they are sensitive to world opinion.

    The vivid images from the Superdome were just too much for these folks. Recently, a prominent Republican businessman, whom I saw in a typical CEO haunt, astonished me with the severity of his attacks on Bush’s competence. And Bush had appointed this guy to a major position! Amazing.

    Main Street: Smaller government deficit hawks
    This is an old-fashioned but important core of conservatism: people who think federal spending should be relentlessly reduced, and that we should always view with suspicion any proposals to increase the role of the federal government in local and private life.

    After binges of spending and legislating, backbenchers in the GOP, especially in the House, are in open revolt, having gathered around Rep. Mike Pence of Indiana and Sen. John McCain in the Senate. They tend to view the “Leadership’s” spending habits with alarm.

    Isolationists
    An old term, but still applicable. With the fall of Communism in Europe and Russia, the old anti-Communist wing of the conservative movement lost its role. Now the isolationists of old are back, and with a new crusade: immigration.

    The relatively unchecked flood of illegal immigrants into this country is indeed a legitimate cause for alarm. But in the eyes of this crowd — one leader is my MSNBC colleague, Pat Buchanan — the Bush Administration is doing nothing.

    Neocons
    They think that the Middle East can be remade, and this country made safe, by instilling a semblance of democracy in the Fertile Crescent and beyond. But they seem to have given up on the ability of the Bush Administration to see that vision through.

    They want more troops, not fewer; more money, not less; more passion, not the whispered talk of timetables for withdrawal.

    Besides championing democracy, we need to show strength and resolve, they believe — and they are no longer convinced that Bush can show much of either.

    Supply-siders
    This is the one faction that the president has yet to disappoint in a major way. He pushed through two major tax cuts, and is pushing more — targeted ones — in the wake of Katrina.

    Deep in their collective memory bank, Bush and Rove remember what happened when Daddy moved his lips and raised taxes. But now that the son has been reelected, will he move his lips, too? If the conservative crack up is to be complete — and I think it will be — the answer is yes.
     
  2. R.H. Lee

    R.H. Lee Member

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    I'm still not sure what a 'neocon' is. I think it's just a pejorative term for the big government liberals who currently occupy the Whitehouse. To equate them with William F. Buckley is comedically absurd.
     
  3. SIOP

    SIOP Member

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    Actually, Buckley is the personification of "neocon", those that talk a conservative game but, in fact, promote collectivism, intrusive government, the U.N., world government, etc.
     
  4. beerslurpy

    beerslurpy member

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    Neocon is just the republican word for socialist. The republicans were doing great until the Contract with America got subverted (circa 9/11/2001) by the fans of expensive, intrusive government.

    The outer coat of varnish is that of liberty and conservatism, but it is still the same collectivist turd it was under the democrats. I honestly dont see a split besides that forming between the president's henchmen and the conservatives who elected him. I think conservatives know what they want, but the people whose job it is to deliver have proven themselves unworthy. Many are just growing sick of the endless betrayals.
     
  5. MechAg94

    MechAg94 Member

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    I always figured neocon was a made up word that journalists think up so they can define it as anything they want.

    On the other hand, I figured it was for people who think they are conservative because they disagree with the leftist Democrats, when it reality, they are just not socialists. I sure there are a million opinions.
     
  6. RealGun

    RealGun Member

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    Seems to me that the President and Congress are very much in sync, including some Democrats. The President may be a lightning rod, but he doesn't do all this stuff single handedly.
     
  7. SIOP

    SIOP Member

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    The fact that Bush is in sync with Democrats ought to tell you something right there.
     
  8. longeyes

    longeyes member

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    Or...imperialist?
     
  9. FeebMaster

    FeebMaster Member

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    Yeah right.
     
  10. AirForceShooter

    AirForceShooter Member

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    The measure of a man is not how he gains power but how he uses it once he has it. It's not an exact quote but it gets the idea across.

    I hate to say it but I think the Congress is going to wind up Democrat in '06.
    The Bushies are really a train wreck in motion. I had such high hopes.

    AFS
     
  11. rick_reno

    rick_reno member

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    I don't think the Democrats are in much better shape - they're just not in control. I believe there are less than a dozen Republican seats that could be in contention in the House - and with a year to go before the mid-term elections a lot can happen. I confess, I don't know which is better - have the Republicans lose the House and FINALLY get the message - or have them barely retain control and MAYBE GET THE MESSAGE. One thing that is obvious is they haven't gotten it yet, but that might be a factor in their leadership - which appears to be non-existent from the top down.
     
  12. beerslurpy

    beerslurpy member

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    Repubs in the house are actually very conservative already and I dont think they are going to lose any seats there.

    The senate is full of rinos, but i dont think there is much room for movement.

    The presidency isnt currently up for grabs.
     
  13. davec

    davec Member

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  14. Chrontius

    Chrontius Member

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  15. carp killer

    carp killer Member

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    When Bush said he would sign the AWB if it reached his desk, that is all I need to know. :fire: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf:
     
  16. AZRickD

    AZRickD Member

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    Not a defensible position.

    Rick
     
  17. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

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    Conservatism will be around long, long after Bush has retired.
     
  18. javafiend

    javafiend member

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    The Bush crackup

    The president has lost his mind.

     
  19. beerslurpy

    beerslurpy member

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    Actually I would say that 80 percent of the conservative (and normally pro-Bush) talk show hosts are anti-miers at the moment, and a lot of callers are complaining about betrayal. Conservatives are really catching on that Bush is not one of them anymore and I think the trust has left the building.

    The Laura Bush accusations of sexism are particularly retarded. Talk about borrowing a page right out of the left wing playbook. It is doubly stupid when you consider that the critics are suggesting Janice Rogers Brown as an alternative.

    This revolt over Miers is a great opportunity for someone in the Senate to grow a pair and demand a real conservative nominee like JRB. It wouldnt weaken the party and it would allow republicans to wrest control at least partially away from the collectivists.
     
  20. longeyes

    longeyes member

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    it's the walnuts, stupid, the walnuts!

    So what's next, a mutiny and Bush playing Capt. Queeg...?
     
  21. Henry Bowman

    Henry Bowman Senior Member

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    To me, that's a "retro-con." More like what "conservative" (establishment) was considered to be in the 1960s. The new conservatives, or the "recently shifted from left to right, D to R" is much more libertarian than the retro-cons.
     
  22. cuchulainn

    cuchulainn Member

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    Every time one party/movement or the other finds itself in a tailspin, especially near an election, we hear predictions of its demise. It never happens.

    Bush's problems are a sign of the demise of neither the GOP nor the conservative movement. :rolleyes:
     
  23. RealGun

    RealGun Member

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    Indeed...somewhat the uniter rather than divider.
     
  24. Waitone

    Waitone Member

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    Republican have no choice but draw a line between themselves and the Bush administration. They simply can not campaign on Bush's governance. Meirs' nomination is where the line was drawn simply to begin the rebuilding of the republican party in 2006. If a side effect is to take Bush to the woodshed so much the better.

    Power in DC is done by building a great big tent while out of power, then opening the flaps when in power. The fact that republicans no longer stand for anything identifiable is no surprise. The 2006 election is the beginning of the process to re-identify themselves.
     
  25. RealGun

    RealGun Member

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    That's an opinion, not fact.
     
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