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The Defensive FN 1910/Browning 1955

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by kentucky_smith, Jun 16, 2009.

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  1. kentucky_smith

    kentucky_smith Member

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    Saw several of these lately and for some reason am intrigued. The one I saw was a Browning 1955 made just prior to 1968, so no longer slide and adjustable sights and in .380. Also, how are these different from a Colt 1903/1908?

    Why would this not be a viable ccw?


    I've been carrying a BHP or full-size 1911 IWB, and think this would work great in a similar fashion. pop_wm_980533.jpg
     
  2. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Two big differences are that the 1910 has a coaxial recoil spring around the barrel for that nice slim slide; and it is striker fired instead of having a concealed hammer. I have seen it recommended to not carry a striker fired pistol cocked and locked because the striker lug might break off and fire the gun in the holster. One gunsmith reported his pocket pistol going off untouched in the closet and ruining his jacket pocket.
     
  3. capttom

    capttom Member

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    Ditto the advice against carrying cocked and locked. The striker/sear engagement is pretty small and with the age of many of these guns, I'd be leery of wear causing an unsafe situation. The sights are tiny even by European pocket pistol standards, but I've had some luck w/ point and shoot with a .32 Browning. It's a classic, unlike the Nazi dragooned 1910/22 with the longer barrel and bayonet slide extension.
     
  4. dogtown tom

    dogtown tom Member

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    The 1910/22 (or Model 1922) was not a Nazi design. It was a result of design changes requested by Yugoslavia. The 1922 was also issued by quite a few police & military forces in Europe.

    After the Nazi's overran the FN plant in Belgium they continued to produce the Hi Power in 9mmP (9x19) and the 1922 in 7.65 (32acp). I'm not sure if the Germans made any 1922's in .380- if they did they are pretty scarce.

    I'm a big fan of these early 2oth century .380's. I have both 1910's, 1922's and Remington Model 51's.

    Occassionally you'll see a boxed set of Browning handguns on Gunbroker- a Baby Browning in .25acp, a 1910/55 in .380acp and a Hi Power in 9mm.
     
  5. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Some folks have a hard time with the grip safety.

    Depending on your hand shape, it may be hard to fully depress the 1910's bass-ackward grip safety every time.

    rc
     
  6. Onmilo

    Onmilo Member

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    I have a 1922 in .32acp, Belgian immediate postwar.
    Pretty tricky and fun to shoot, nine in the magazine and I agree on carrying one of these pistols chamber empty.
    The larger size means no real felt recoil and the gun is still accurate out to 25 meters.
    standard.gif
     
  7. capttom

    capttom Member

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    "unlike the Nazi dragooned 1910/22 with the longer barrel and bayonet slide extension."
    Maybe I should have said "drafted" rather than "dragooned." Thanks for the info on the Yugoslav origins of the '22. The Dutch adopted it at about the same time, I think. The Netherlands had earlier issued the Browning/FN 1903, so they had experience with the Belgium products.
     
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