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The Ek® Commando Knife

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by rcmodel, Oct 26, 2012.

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  1. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Model M4
    6.6”, double-edge HCS 1415 stainless steel.
    The blade appears to be thick & strong enough to use it for an Abrams tank bumper-jack handle!

    I bought this one real cheap on eBay years ago.
    I see they go for $300 bucks from EK now!!
    Yikes!

    It’s nice, but not quite that nice!

    It originally had the black 650-paracord wrapped handle, which was a mess!
    So, I made new black Micarta scales and X-Bolts for it.

    EKM42.jpg
    EMM43.jpg

    rc
     
  2. lobo9er

    lobo9er Member

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    lol I was just about to type " RCMODEL just made one looks alot like it"
     
  3. Valkman

    Valkman Member

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    How did you get around working on sharp knives? I always hated it and didn't do it often but I dulled them and taped the edges, then sharpened them up after the work was done.
     
  4. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Was it an Effingham Ek?
     
  5. 50 Shooter

    50 Shooter member

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    Nice, I have two.

    Bought one back in the mid 80's and a blank off eBay a couple years back.
     
  6. lemaymiami

    lemaymiami Member

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    Some years ago in Miami I wandered into a dusty storefront that showed a few knives, knife rejects, etc. I was lucky enough to be able to talk for a bit with the old boy in the shop.... I was shortsighted enough not to even consider a purchase (could have bought a handful of old knives in every stage of creation). But by then I was already a fisherman and combat/utility knives weren't on the agenda with Vietnam about five or so years behind me.

    You guessed it everything in the shop was made by that old man - it wasn't until years later I read about the Ek knife.... I've occasionally thought of buying one but the urge quickly passes. Those WWII classics by Ek are from a time when many soldiers came from backgrounds that including knife making skills and if you needed something you made it if you could.

    Wish I'd paid better attention to everything he had to say that day...

    By the way the original Ek knife had rock maple handles and leaded rivets and could be found in more than one blade style...
     
  7. dprice3844444

    dprice3844444 member

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    you met old john ek,he was a helluva guy.buddy of mine,sf colonel,and journalist made friends with the family years ago.he wound up purchasing a dewat 0815 maxim from the widow,that we had rewatted.gun was mint.
     
  8. Gordon

    Gordon Member

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    No this one did not go to Vietnam (all though I did twice), but it did go to Panama
    006-7.gif

    Miami Fla made 1973
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2012
  9. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Yes.

    Thats a Nice one Gordon!
    I'd rather have it then mine!

    rc
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2012
  10. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    I don't really know.
    Just a lifelong fascination with things like that.
    My dad had me helping him sharpening mower sickle blades on a bench grinder from the time I was old & tall enough to hold them up on one end.


    That progressed to this:
    I made my first two knives in 1955 when I was 11 on my old mans belt driven, babbitt bearing, low speed, vibrating and bouncing, homemade bench grinder.
    I'd put in a half hour or so every night after school & chores were done.

    I saved up my lunch money to buy two wooden file handles at the hardware store in town.

    Myfirstknives.jpg

    Then I got in some very serious trouble, because I plum wore out his v-shape mower sickle stone grinding down his last two old files.

    And it was about time to cut hay again, with nothing left to sharpen the mower sickle blades with! :D


    Actually though, I have never been badly cut while working blades.
    You just got to pay real close attention all the time so a belt sander or buffing wheel doesn't snatch one out of your hand and stick it through you.
    And always wear leather gloves while grinding and buffing!

    I guess the worst I ever got dinged was sawing up a block of Desert Ironwood for scales once.
    The table saw grabbed it out of my push stick, and it hit me in the chest going just below escape velocity.
    At least it appeared so from the bruse and sore ribs after I got up off the floor!

    rc
     
  11. lemaymiami

    lemaymiami Member

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    RC, I saw those two pics in another thread and greatly admired them. They'd have fit right in with pics I've seen of "theater made" knives from WWII..... In every case there was something of the maker clearly visible in the finished product, from just functional to outstanding....

    Some of the old blades that I saw in Ek's shop all those years ago were not nearly as well made as your first effort...
     
  12. Gordon

    Gordon Member

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    RC , just by chance, did you ever have a turn at one of those old timey foot driven big grind stones? I knew an old German man as a boy and later who came around with one of those in the back of his old Ford pickup bed and sharpened everything. He used a water drip and his stone must have been fairly fine , guessing around 300+ grit, as it would put a near razor edge on a knife or very sharp edge on other stuff rather quickly. He used a couple hand cranked stones too, one that ground away lots quick so he could put it on "der vheel" and black arkansaw and strops as he did barber's razors too! I been looking many years for a big foot wheel stone with a reasonable fine grit. I found a few course ones, not cheap, but yet to find a fine one which I will buy!
     
  13. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Not the big old foot cranked ones, although there was one in my dads farm scrap iron pile with a broken stone. :banghead:

    He used the broken stone parts as a stepping stone in front of the shop.

    We did use an electric version at work which was a water emersed low-speed 10" wheel type.
    Kinda like this, only not near as fancy!
    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=18918

    We sharpened our counter-die knives on it used to cut out intricate patterns for greeting card emboss press plattens.

    It would in fact put a shaving edge on just about anything, with no chance of over-heating the blade!!

    rc
     
  14. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    My Ek G-5 Commando Bowie (walnut handle) was my first "survival" knife in 1990. I bought two knives that day. I traded a Mossberg Chuckster rifle for my first custom knife and bought the Ek. Needless to say, since then there have been many knives, but no more Ek's. No idea what they are worth now. I could be convinced to sell mine as I have never used it.
     
  15. Madcap_Magician

    Madcap_Magician Member

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    Ek knives are hard to value unless you're very familiar with the brand because they've been made by so many people for so long. The brand has been traded around a lot. I always liked the designs, especially the bowie.
     
  16. mdauben

    mdauben Member

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    Love the designs and I have more than once thought about buying one, but I just can't justify the asking price when I really have no practical use for one. :(
     
  17. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    There have only been 4, or 5 if you count John Ek's son as separate, manufacturers.

    John Ek, his son, the Virginia Military Historical Society (or something like that), Black[strike]hawk[/strike]Jack and the current manufacturer (headed by the leader during the VMHS period).

    Original John Ek period knives in reasonable condition with the booklet that came with them are quite valuable.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2012
  18. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Yes, to the tune of $2,500 - $3,000 for the real WWII ones I have seen for sale at military shows lately.

    And there are probably more counterfeit ones for sale now then real ones left.

    rc
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2012
  19. lemaymiami

    lemaymiami Member

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    Out of curiousity I jumped up on E-Bay yesterday to get a quick scan of what was currenty being offered under the "Ek knife" category and found four pages (about 2/3 of which had nothing to with the topic, of course). I quickly scanned all the ones shown (and they ranged from the usual retail in every style) a few older samples - but nothng from the original 65 to 79year old time frame... I did see one or two that not only were worth a second look but were actually pretty reasonably priced....
     
  20. Owen Sparks

    Owen Sparks member

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    I bought one from Atlanta Cutlery back in the late 1980's and traded it off immediatly. It looked to be cheaply made and of low quality. The paracord handle seemed to be a cheap way around providing a proper grip and I swapped it even for a Gerber Mark II.
     
  21. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    Now you know why I do not like a paracord grip on any knife.
     
  22. Madcap_Magician

    Madcap_Magician Member

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    It was Blackjack that made EK knives for a while, not Blackhawk. I'm 99.9% sure on that one.

    I had an oddball EK commando knife apparently made for some Australian unit that was A2 steel and gray canvas micarta with a full guard. I miss that knife. I gave it away on a knife forum 'give a knife, take a knife' thing, and the guy took my knife and never posted a new knife to give to anyone. Go figure.
     
  23. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Doh!

    Dang fat fingers. Yep, BlackJack knives made Eks.

    John Ek, his son, Richmond, Effingham (BlackJack), Richmond is the sequence.
     
  24. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    BlackJack fixed blades today are made by Bark River.
     
  25. Madcap_Magician

    Madcap_Magician Member

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    That's true, and BRK does a fine job of them.
     
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