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The Marlin 39 Club

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by AStone, Mar 11, 2007.

  1. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Wow, three new THR members in a very short time starting in 39A-ville. Welcome to THR folks.

    Rube, sorry to hear of those scratches.

    BW, don't have that take down guide, but found one here for $8.

    James, nice shooting. Makes me want to get to the range soon.
    _______

    Some time in the next few days (still undetermined when), I'm leaving for a few days of camping in the mountains. (Long overdue. Haven't had a day off since Christmas.)

    Yall don't burn down the club house while I'm gone. Remember: .22LR rnds are in the cabinet next to the fridge. Kick the dirt off your boots when you come in, and especially if you're going to put your feet on the couch.

    ;)

    Nem
     
  2. Brassman

    Brassman Member

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    James,
    Really nice grouping for 100 yds. I wish I could do that! Yours at 100 look kinda like mine at 25 yds. I don't have a reddot, I use a Skinner aperture, but maybe I should reconsider. What kind of ammo did you use?
     
  3. James1

    James1 Member

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    federal value pack I go for the big box of 22's since I live out in BFE but I reload about everything else I shoot on a regular basis
     
  4. Brassman

    Brassman Member

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    James

    Then really nice shooting for bulk ammo. I thought maybe you were using some high priced match stuff. I still wish I could do that at 100 yards, even with the good stuff.
     
  5. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Ballard vs. Micro-Groove

    Local shop has brand new 39A for $475, or very old ones with Ballard rifling for $600.

    Anyone have opinions about whether Ballard rifling in a .22 is worth a lot of extra money, especially given that the guns are used vs. new?
     
  6. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    The "Ballard" rifling is simply old style cut rifling.
    In those days, Marlin actually manufactured the barrel by cutting each groove individually instead of forming them all at once as with modern button rifling heads.

    Personally, I can't tell any difference between my 1950 model with Ballard rifling and my nephews 1980's model with Micro-Groove.

    The later Micro-Groove rifling guns do have a strong reputation for excellent accuracy, and it's said it deforms the bullet less and grips it better.

    Personally, given the choice between a brand new Marlin and an older one in good shape, I'd take the old one.
    Take a look at the wood to metal fit on the butt stock of the older versions versus the newer rifles. The old rifles had the stock final fitted by induction heating the receiver tangs and pressing the stock on.
    This actually "scorched" the wood to a tight fit.
     
  7. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

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    Plus, it's been my experience that the trigger pulls on the older 39s are superior to the newer ones.
     
  8. MP-43

    MP-43 Member

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    At a CADA show weekend before last, saw a mint 1954 39A for $450. Was sorely tempted, but the main detraction was the big scratch on the hammer and the matching marks on the right-rear edge of the bolt--clearly caused by someone breaking the rifle down w/o pulling the hammer to 1/2 cock first. the worst part was that you could tell they really muscled it--the scratch was deep, and the metal on the back point of the bolt was smoothly rubbed/bent over.

    The seller tried to tell me that it was normal wear--same as you would see on the hinge area of the lever...I explained how it happened, and he was adament that it was normal. That always bugs me, but it sure made walking away a lot easier!

    Of course, gunshows aren't exactly no-BS zones; just last weekend I heard a seller telling a potential customer that the stamped Romanian AK he was looking at was "all milled from one block of steel"...nice...
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2007
  9. eliphalet

    eliphalet Member

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    Traded a Russian SKS today for a Marlin 39 made the year I was born, with F as the letter in the serial number. I had been looking a few years , seem em on the Auction sights but this was the first in person with a f begining number. I couldn't believe the guy traded me straight across, FFL dealer at a gun show. Made my day to say the least. It is in good condition and shoots fine, bore looks great but haven't papered it yet, It would let a cartridge ride to high every magazine full or so. I will order a new cartridge guide spring, which is only a couple of bucks or so and a screw or two for looks...
    I hadn't shot the SKS in 10 years or so and had no use for it anyway. Had checked the SKS for value, and it was nothing special, just a factory refurb but was in 99% condition.
    This will be the 3rd 39 I have owned and it feels good to have one again.
    You can add my name to the list.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2007
  10. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Count me in - just bought one!

    I don't know about others' QC experiences, but the new guns I saw were flawless.

    Mine is NIB, the other was a rack gun at the store, for customers to fondle.

    Both had walnut with some figure, good stock fit, no scratches or anything wierd like that.

    Anyway, 10 days to satisfy California that I'm not buying a .22LR lever action to go commit mayhem in the streets, and I'll really be in the club.
     
  11. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Please consider a donation to THR to help stop outages

    Well, we're back on line after a LONG weekend of THR being down on a holiday weekend that I did not have off (since I took my "vacation" last week), so I was stuck in the studio all weekend with no THR.

    Arrrrggggggg!!!!!! :eek::eek::eek:

    Glad we're back up. Another DDOS attack. Details of the most recent attack here. (Other threads in technical support chronicle the previous attacks over the last few months.)

    Want to help solve that problem? Please make a donation to THR to help our webmaster, Derek Zeenah, solve the problem.

    Thanks. Glad to be back.

    Nem
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2007
  12. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Eliphalent & ArmedBear, welcome in. Glad you've joined us. :)
     
  13. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Please forgive if this is a duplicate question that's already been addressed.

    Does anyone (especially Marlin) recommend any particular brand or "model" of lube as preferential for the 39s?
     
  14. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Thanks, Nem.

    I'll add to that: I'm picking up my new gun at a shop with a range.

    Should I bring a cleaning kit, or just run a boresnake through it and oil the action, or ???
     
  15. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    Nematocyst-870:
    Marlin has no recommendations for lubes.

    Basically, it's whatever you like.
    Personally, I use CLP Breakfree as a preservative to prevent corrosion, and "Super-Lube" Teflon grease as the lubricant on the bolt and lever assemblies.

    Recently, after reading about using the old "Gunslick" graphite gun grease, I remembered that that's what my buddy always used on his hammer and trigger interfaces.
    As an experiment, I cleaned the Super-Lube off those parts and applied some Gunslick.
    I don't notice any difference over the Super-Lube, but the Gunslick says it has a "honing action" and this takes time.

    Again, people will argue endlessly on the internet about what's the best lube.
    WHAT you use is not important, it's that you DO lube.
    My personal belief is that one good grade lube works just as well as another.
     
  16. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    But you prefer a thin lube (CLP) as opposed to a medium oil (Bullfrog) or thick stuff like hingepin grease?

    I'm just wondering about a general class of lube, e.g. grease or oil.

    Thanks!
     
  17. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    No, I use the thin CLP Breakfree as a rust preventive.
    CLP is one of the very best for this.

    To actually lubricate the action I use a thick grease.
    In my case, it's Super-Lube Teflon grease.
    Unlike the thin liquid lubes, grease stays where you put it and doesn't run off.
     
  18. Shrinkmd

    Shrinkmd Member

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    Original sight usage?

    I decided to yank off the lousy scope and scope mount, and I want to try it out with the original ramp buckhorn sights before I probably do a Marble's tang.

    Anyway, how do I adjust the slider? It doesn't want to move! I sprayed some CLP on it, since it hasn't moved in who knows how long. I know this is a silly question, but I already rubbed the skin off my thumb trying to push the sight up and down to elevate it. What is the magic trick?

    Also, what are the approximate distances? Is all the way down good to 50, and all the way elevated for 100 yd or more?

    Thanks
     
  19. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    Lift the rear sight up, then push the slider.
    This takes tension off the slider and allows it to move easier.

    There are no definite ranges on these old slider type sights. You sight in by trial and error.

    You sight in at a certain range by moving the slider back and forth until you're on target.
    If you want to shoot at another range, you start all over, and usually, you can't just move the sight back to where it was to shoot at the first range you sighted in at. You usually have to re-sight in again.
     
  20. AStone

    AStone Member

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    I saw Shrink's query earlier, and almost responded.

    But I knew D'wheel would offer a better response than I would (I was right), so I waited.

    And I found the following an interesting point:

    D'wheel, I may be misinterpreting your point.

    But for now, I'm interpreting that as, "Once you sight in at 25, then at 75 (by moving the slider), you can't simply move the slider back to the '25 slot' and expect it to be sighted in at 25 again."

    Right?

    If so, that's counterintuitive. I'm NOT saying it's wrong - I trust your opinion on these things a LOT - but I haven't yet understood why it would be true.

    If so, that's really interesting. That suggests that sights are sensitive to initial conditions. That's common for dynamical systems like physiologies, ecosystems and economies, but usually less so for more 'static' systems like machines and, I would have guessed, rifle sights.
    _______

    It's a beautiful spring day here: 76ish, blue skies, light breeze.

    I am so jonesing to take the 39 to the range, but <violins begin to play> am stuck at work (forever, as far as I can see right now :uhoh: ) ... and still haven't even had time to fix my firing pin (which sits to my right on my workbench :( ).
     
  21. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Nem-

    I think it's a combination of factors.

    We, as humans, selectively view the event as "moving the slide from slot 3 to slot 2."

    However, the little piece of steel doesn't respect our neat little mental filters.

    The final resting place of the sight has to do with static friction (sensitive to initial condition), dynamic friction (sensitive to speed at which the slide is moved), spring tension (also sensitive to initial conditions, among other things, like how we lifted the leaf), the characteristics of the spring itself, variations in static and dynamic friction as modulated by the spring, etc.

    Of course, with a .30-30 on big game, it's probably "close enough." Our brain processes a 1" deviation at 100 yards as "zero", and a 2" deviation as "not enough to matter."

    With a .22LR, a heavy barrel, and a small target, we're going to notice smaller variations and, in our minds, translate those into larger perceived deviations. 2 MOA seems like a lot more if you're squirrel hunting or trying to shoot eggs off a bush (fun!) than if you're deer hunting.

    Thus, I posit that this has much to do with our perceptions and expectations. That's why it seems "counterintuitive." But if you divorce your thinking from the idea of what the sight does, and just think about pieces of steel rubbing together and holding position based on friction and spring tension, the variation seems perfectly natural.
     
  22. tubeshooter

    tubeshooter Member

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    Nice explanation! Thanks for that, I found it informative.
     
  23. AStone

    AStone Member

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    A'Bear, I agree with Tube: makes sense.

    We'll see what D'wheel has to add.

    I've been thinking again lately about having that heavy 24" barrel cut down to 18" or 20".

    I have confidence that it's going to improve the shootability of this little 39.
     
  24. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Why would you do that?!?

    I got to shoot mine last night. It was GREAT!!!

    I don't think I've ever enjoyed shooting a rifle as much. Seriously.

    No FTF, no stovepipes, no mess, no rags, no black fingers, no unfired rounds on the ground. Small groups, and the standing off-hand balance is some of the best I've ever felt.

    I don't much like my 10/22. One problem? Too short, and not enough weight up front to balance the gun. After last night, I might sell the POS.

    That 39A is right on the money, for me. I'd think long and hard before screwing with it. It'll make the muzzle jump around more, not less, when you shoot offhand.
     
  25. AStone

    AStone Member

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    <smiles>

    I hear you, A'Bear. Thanks for expressing your thoughts on that.

    Trust me, this isn't a snap decision. I've been thinking about it for a LONG time, and have discussed it in several threads, including this one (I think ... I'll have to look back through when I get some time). I've gotten the opinion of my gunsmith (who will do it for $100, including shortening the magazine ... he's done them before), and he didn't think it was a bad idea.

    I've researched affects on ballistics, too. (Some reduction of velocity potentially, but not huge. If I do it, I'm going to chrono the same rnds - several brands - before and after as a test of this null hypothesis: shortening the barrel from 24" to 18" or 20" will not affect ballistics.)

    I know it's total heresy to consider a barrel cut, especially on a classic like this. I understand all the arguments against (as well as for) doing so.

    What's driving the proposal is as much my reaction to this rifle (for me, it just feels too long and barrel heavy for quick pointing; I'll be using it for short, quick shots, not long-distance paper punching), my past experiences with rifles (I much prefer carbines, how they carry, especially in difficult terrain, how quickly they point) and a gut-level feeling. (And yes, I listen to those gut level feelings, and 7 or 8 out of 10 are good decisions.)

    YMMV, and all that.

    Haven't committed to it 100%, yet, but leaning ...

    Nem
     

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