The THR Walker Club

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by scrat, Feb 18, 2008.

  1. cyberdan

    cyberdan Member

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    I shot my Goonerized Walker today. It has gone from a loved but difficult to manage beast to a SWEET shooting revolver worth way more than I paid to have it Goonerized. The first time I took it out, I had trouble adjusting to it. Now i can't put it down. Thanks so much Mike.
     
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  2. cyberdan

    cyberdan Member

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    Pickett bullets

    What is the attraction of pickett bullets? Pardon my ignorance, but I don't understand why they even exist.
     
  3. rodwha

    rodwha Member

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    The attraction would be because they are historical.

    The reason, I would guess, would be for the higher ballistic coefficient and mass giving them better downrange authority and penetration. Not much different than the conicals used in a rifle.
     
  4. 45 Dragoon

    45 Dragoon Member

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    Wow! Thanks so much Cyberdan!!!!

    They are fun to cycle a little!! It will will help with the muscle memory !! ;)

    Mike
    www.goonsgunworks.com
     
  5. razorback1010

    razorback1010 Member

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    It all has to do with fluid dynamics equations. In a nutshell, the trajectory of a sphere travelling in a fluid (e.g. air) will not only suffer from a dramatic slowdown due to the frictions with the said fluid induced by the huge cross section of the sphere (the full area represented by the disk with the longest diameter in the sphere) but also from heavy turbulences in its wake, likely to throw the bullet out of its trajectory at long distances. IOT to overcome these limitations, as early as 1835, sugarloaf bullets were used for target shooting, the conical design allowing for a smaller cross section thus somehow limiting the loss of speed and flattening the trajectory, with the added benefit of less turbulences in the wake, overall critically increasing both range and accuracy. If you take a sphere and a cone of which the length would be the double of its diameter, you end up with nearly the same weight (for a pure lead .457 caliber bullet, the sphere ends up at 143.43 gr, the cone at 143.44 gn) Many shapes were tried and as soon as 1859, conoidal-cylindrical bullets were used (some were even boat-tailed, further reducing the drag), adding the weight of the cylinder behind the cone (taking the same caliber, .457, a bullet with a cylinder base of double its diameter and the same cone length of the double of its diameter would weigh 574.76 gn). The conoidal bullet known as the Pickett bullet for the Walker is a quite early design, sugarloaf shaped but needle-pointed instead of rounded as most were in that time period, and as discussed before, Pedersoli's efforts at re-creating that bullet are unsatisfactory to say the least.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2015
  6. mykeal

    mykeal Member

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    Umm, I think spherical and conical bullets of the same caliber have the same frontal cross sectional area...
     
  7. cyberdan

    cyberdan Member

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    Picket bullet

    Thanks razorback1010,
    My first impression of a picket bullet was that it was very pointed. It looks like it would have trouble going down the barrel as well as being a little wobbly in flight. I recognize it's evolution to The modern bullet design now. A good lesson thank you.
     
  8. razorback1010

    razorback1010 Member

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    you are absolutely right as far as mathematics are concerned, I must have been a wee carried away when trying a bout at vulgarization, thus losing the essence of the topic and introducing a mistake. My bad, really. But I hadn't been wanting to write something along these lines:
    "Fx=1/2ρV²SCx and x=(V²t/g)ln(V²t+gU0t/V²t)"
     
  9. mykeal

    mykeal Member

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    How about, "...the conical design allowing for a smaller drag coefficient..."

    Yes, the conical front doesn't by itself guarantee a significantly better drag environment, but it does allow the designer to do better with judicious choice of aft end shapes.
     
  10. PainlessWolf

    PainlessWolf Member

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    Finally found one of these on sale for a decent price. ( and as soon as I bought it, I saw that Cabelas was selling them for 39.99 ) :banghead: Anyway, it was advertised as new but when it arrived, there were buff marks where it had sat a very long time and has been polished up. No dings or nicks yet one of the attachment points for the strap is loose. I haven't decided to either use a little Metal Mend or get out the solder gun. ( flask is empty with no residue of any sort ) I took it apart and carefully filed off some burrs and straightened the shaft of the long threaded rod so that the mechanism snaps shut easily when spring pressure is released. That rod is brass and bends easily so a stronger metal could be used. I adjusted the spout to 50 grains and now need to find a strap for it. This flask will be a handy and functional\cool accessory when I go shooting with the Walker next week.

    Repair Update: Tried a couple of things but since the hole the pin rests in was reamed out, I was down to considering resin solder or a new mixture out from Loc-Tite. The Loc-Tite metal repair did the trick neatly. Can't budge it now. Carrying on with my BP fun! Received a 3-in-1 tool by RMC and a reloading\display stand from DGW yesterday.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 28, 2015
  11. jaxenro

    jaxenro Member

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    When I get some time I will add some of my crappy cell phone pics of mine it's a Uberti in 36 caliber
     
  12. StrawHat

    StrawHat Member

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    I think I'd rather see a separate thread for that one! Probably lot's of information to be shared.

    Kevin
     
  13. 58limited

    58limited Member

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    White Walker,

    Have you started on another Walker yet? I hope you post a step by step thread when you do.

    I really like what you did with your previous one and I read your thread about it. Mine is off being Goonerized but I'm going to antique it like yours when I get it back. I don't have the machining skills to do all of your modifications but I will antique the finish. I'm also going to send it to Sack Peterson to have stag grips made for it, then I'm having a cross draw holster similar to Gus McCrae's made for it. My other Walker will remain like new other than the cylinder which I have stripped to put it in the white. It will be my "showpiece" after I have it engraved.
     
  14. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Opportunity to examine 2 orignial Walkers

    An opportunity is at hand, but for only 2 days. If you are interested move quickly.

    Two original Colt Walkers and an even more rare power flask are about to be auctioned. All 3 of these items have superior illustrations, and they can be enlarged by wanding with the mouse/cursor to expand small sections for close-up inspection. They are also backed with extensive descriptions.

    And while you are visiting this site do look around. It is filled with outstanding eye-candy, consisting of arms of every description from flintlocks to machine guns. Lots and lots of Western firearms and lore.


    http://www.rockislandauction.com/viewitem/aid/64/lid/1097

    http://www.rockislandauction.com/viewitem/aid/64/lid/3134

    http://www.rockislandauction.com/viewitem/aid/64/lid/1108
     
  15. 58limited

    58limited Member

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    I just posted this in another thread and decided to post here as well since everyone seems to like night fire pics of the Walker. Round ball over 50 grains of Swiss 1 1/2 Fg powder.:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2015
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  16. DoubleDeuce 1

    DoubleDeuce 1 Member

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    It looks like you could easily roast a couple of steaks with that muzzle flask.:cool:
     
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  17. expat_alaska

    expat_alaska Member

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    Glad You Aren't My Chef...

    Not sure if I ever had a roasted steak. :D
     
  18. expat_alaska

    expat_alaska Member

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    Thanks for posting those links. I have one C&B replica revolver and am a noob. I have read many books about the Civil War/War Of Northern Aggression but have just recently begun studying the weapons used in that conflict.

    I realize that the Walkers were used in combat prior to that in the U.S./Mexican War, but I download and save photos for my personal perusal and comparison. Of special interest was the Walker with the Dragoon load lever and shortened barrel and relocated sights.

    I'll bet Josey Wales used one of them in conjunction with an 1860 Army in at least one scene (just watched the movie a couple of days ago and have seen it many times, maybe ad nauseum to some). Thank whomever for DVR and the ability to advance the movie frame by frame. My wife thinks I am nuts (and she may well be correct).

    Thank you!

    Jim
     
  19. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Methinks it might be best not to comment... :neener: :D

    In 3 days that auction made 11 million, 200 thousand, bucks! :what:

    And anyone with a computer could ride along for free. :)

    This, and many future auctions will often feature all kinds of weapons and other artifacts associated with the Civil War. Usually over 95% of the lots represent original items. They offer priceless opportunities for anyone looking for a chance to do some personal research - and it's all for free unless you choose to bid on something. Not all of the lots are priced at levels for millionaires' only.
     
  20. PainlessWolf

    PainlessWolf Member

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    Mornin' all,
    I was replacing the screws on the my Walker last night with a new set from Uberti and I noticed the year proof mark stamp was a CH. Curious this morning, I attempted to look it up and couldn't find a stamp newer than 2009. I bought this gun used and it has been the recipient of both upgrades and some carrying around. Anyone here know what the CH is equal to for 'year of manufacture'?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  21. expat_alaska

    expat_alaska Member

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    It appears to be 2011 manufacture.

    Found this for us, but don't know how accurate the advance letters will be.

    I works up until 2014 [CM].

    ItalianDateStamps_zps1bjf73js.jpg

    Have fun!

    Jim

    Edit: All of the pics (including this data pic) are posted via Photobucket. I never delete them, but if Photobucket ever goes tits up, they will all be gone on every forum I have ever posted them. If you want them for posterity, print them out and do it old (like me) school: save it on paper.

    Jim
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2015
  22. PainlessWolf

    PainlessWolf Member

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    ExPat,
    Thank you very much, Sir. 2011. Well, that makes sense. This gun still looks great even with the wear along sharp edges associated with being set down on stones \ gritty surfaces. It's seen some use and has had the loading lever changed out for a Dragoon's and the catch for that type of lever added to the barrel. It has both types of catch so the lever never releases under a full powder load. In addition, a tritium type sight has been added and the 'V' notch widened into a 'U'. Certainly makes for more accuracy. I need to consider the wedge now. I note that I have to tap it twice with a brass hammer to get it to set to where there is no frame shake yet the cylinder still turns freely. If I push hard enough with my hand tho' I can still release it and push it back through the frame. Is this normal or should I replace the wedge? The revolver fires and works normally and I see none of the signs that this heavy duty steel frame has been stretched. More questions about the Walker, thanks in advance for the consideration.
     
  23. expat_alaska

    expat_alaska Member

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    Like this?

    ColtWalkerDragoonLoadLeverShortBarrel001_zpsyyhqqdik.jpg

    ColtWalkerDragoonLoadLeverShortBarrel002_zpsjqkxheom.jpg

    I have a Pietta 1851 Navy steel .36 bought from Cabela's 4 months ago. My wedge was as yours when the gun was new. I checked the arbor fit to the barrel well and found that the arbor was a good fit (not short). .001-.002" gap at the cylinder, and the frame /barrel fit was excellent. The wedge was, as you say, very tight and I sanded the sides a bit until the wedge spring just protruded from the barrel on the right, then re-blued it. I then had to deal with the bolt engagement with the cylinder to prevent future peening on the cylinder.

    I have no experience with a Walker, and I think it had oval cylinder stop slots, so your guess is probably better than mine. Hope you enjoy the pics.
     
  24. PainlessWolf

    PainlessWolf Member

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    ExPat,
    I certainly do! Looks like my revolver about a hundred years from now. The current wedge goes all the way through the frame and there is a little space around the edges as it tapers towards the front on the reverse side. I know that Taylors has the wedge for this Uberti so I will probably replace it just to be safe. Thank you again for the thoughts and information, Sir.
     
  25. expat_alaska

    expat_alaska Member

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    The Ultimate BP C&B Revolver

    My dream:

    A First or Second model Colt Dragoon (squareback trigger guard) mated with a Walker cylinder (oval bolt slots but maybe machined for rectangular slots for the Second Model), modifying the Dragoon barrel forcing cone to fit the Walker cylinder insofar as barrel gap and arbor fit.

    Piettas have a rep for arbor fit. Uberti has a rep for bolt fit.

    It has been talked about for many years but I have not seen one. It is plausibly workable. If I had beaucoup money, I would attempt it.

    Any one here have any thoughts?

    Jim
     
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