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These ArcStations would make excellent reloading benches!

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by MCMXI, May 20, 2010.

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  1. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    The weights, costs and dimensions of each bench are as follows:

    (A) 30S - 123 lbs, $352, 29"x29"x35" (LxWxH)
    (B) 30SX – 177 lbs, $460, 29"x29"x35" (LxWxH)
    (C) 60S – 230 lbs, $634, 29"x58"x35" (LxWxH)
    (D) 60SX – 318 lbs, $778, 29"x58"x35" (LxWxH)

    The solid tops are 3/16" steel and the slotted tops are 3/8" steel (wouldn't need that anyway). They're made by Miller Electric and intended to be used for welding but the 60S sure would make a great reloading bench and should be very stable at 230lb!! All tables can be joined together if more space is required.

    http://www.millerwelds.com/products/workstations/arcstation/

    [​IMG]

    :)
     
  2. mongoose33

    mongoose33 Member

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    Agreed, they likely would make great reloading benches, but I have to wonder what they'd do, at $634 (plus, presumably, shipping), that a $100 bench made from a solid-core door w/ massive 2x4 legs wouldn't do?

    For $634 I could build a wooden workbench and then have $534 left over to buy reloading equipment or components.
     
  3. rondog

    rondog Member

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    Or just get one of these from Costco for $200. Put some 2x12's across the bottom for a shelf. Even add a second shelf up higher.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    I'm not a fan of 100% wooden benches ... and I'd hardly call 2x4 legs "massive" ... :D . What I like about the ArcStation is that it's HEAVY and MODULAR. I built a walk-in safe/reloading room in my house and built a bench into the wall by welding up angle iron and bolting it to the studs along three sides of the room. I then bolted a 2" thick slab of wood to the angle but I can't take it with me if I sell my house. I remember the good ol' days in '92 when I started reloading. I had a RockChucker on the dining room table secured with two C-clamps .... thankfully those days are long gone.

    Anyway, it's your money so spend it how you want but I think you'd be hard pressed to make a table like the ArcStation for the price. I have a bunch of material in the garage so maybe I'll break out the plasma and mig welder this summer and put something together ... just in case.

    :)
     
  5. mongoose33

    mongoose33 Member

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    I double my 2x4 legs w/ spacers in between. With a shelf on the bottom supported by 2x4 crosspieces running the length of the bench, a plywood shelf, heavy things on the shelf, a solid-core door on top, that bench doesn't go anywhere.

    I also have a system for leveling that's terrific (credit to my F-I-L for that).

    No, for $100 I can do pretty well.

    [​IMG]

    Here's the leveling system:

    [​IMG]


    That particular bench shows my golf clubmaking setup; I've since mounted presses to it next to where the vise is, and they're rock solid. It's just hard to see $534 of value added with the other bench.
     
  6. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    mongoose33, definitley one of the better wooden benches I've seen on this forum ... very nice!! In my previous life I was a coded pipe welder (ASME 5G to the welders out there) so my preference is steel but to each their own. As to whether or not the ArcStation is worth it .... to me it would be both for practical and aesthetic reasons. I find the idea of a free-standing, HEAVY bench that I could put on casters very appealing.

    :)
     
  7. TexasShooter59

    TexasShooter59 Member

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    mongoose33, what is the thing to the right of your vise in the first photo? It looks like a hollow cylinder with a disk on one end. When I was in high school, I worked for a guy that built custom clubs and did repairs as a business. It was a lot of fun and I learned a lot about using tools, then. Looks like you might have a swing weight scale on your narrow shelf on the far right.
     
  8. mongoose33

    mongoose33 Member

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    Make no mistake, I'm not saying those aren't nice setups. Heavy is good. They look like really good stuff.
     
  9. mongoose33

    mongoose33 Member

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    Then you might be the only guy on THR who understands what I'm about to say. :)

    The device is known as a "spin jig" which accepts a variety of collets for securing cylindrical stock. It allows you to rotate that stock any number of degrees. A golf club shaft, at the grip, is cylindrical.

    I use it for spine alignment of golf club shafts. First I find the neutral bending point (NBP) using my spinefinder:

    [​IMG]

    After marking that, I secure the shaft in the collet, then "twang" the shaft vertically in the neutral bending plane, as determined by my spinefinder. I make tiny adjustments until I achieve FLO (Flat-line oscillation) of the shaft in the spin-jig. FLO means the shaft oscillates back and forth in a plane or line, no circular or oval motion.

    That oscillation plane of the shaft, when inserted into the golf club head, should be oriented toward target. So what I do then (and this is why the spin jig is valuable to me) is rotate the shaft 90 degrees, then affix the clubhead to the now-rotated shaft with the face of the golf club oriented vertically. The spin jig has reference marks/holes that allow you to rotate the stock any angle you like--and for this, 90 degress is what I need.

    I'll make reference marks on both the shaft and the clubhead so when I epoxy them together I can return them to the correct orientation.



    And yes, that's a swingweight scale on the narrow shelf.

    The golf club business has sagged over the years, a combination of the waning of Tiger-hype, the recession, and the overbuilding of clubmaking capacity in the industry which now requires significant cutting of prices. I make custom clubs, one at a time matched to a spec which fits the golfer, but not many golfers are discerning enough to understand why that matters. I can't compete on price, but the value-added I provide isn't as clear in this era of marketing hype.

    Such golfers would rather try to buy a game than develop one, and part of the "mystique," such as it is, is that they'd rather pull at "Ping" or "Titleist" or "Taylormade" iron from their bag, even if it's not matched as part of a set, than pull a "Clubdoctor" iron from the bag.

    That workbench is now given over to reloading duties. I've removed the spin jig, the frequency-meter clamp, and the golf club rule, now the bench is covered with brass I'm sorting and working with. :)
     
  10. RustyFN

    RustyFN Member

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    Looks like they would make a nice bench. I perfer a wood bench and also a taller bench. I like to load standing up sometimes.
     
  11. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    here is my golf club

    [​IMG]
     
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