Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

These good AK recoil buffers?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by SnP, May 17, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. SnP

    SnP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Messages:
    46
  2. MTMilitiaman

    MTMilitiaman Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2005
    Messages:
    2,689
    Location:
    Missoula, Montana
    If you want a recoil buffer, the Buffer Tech is the way to go. The Blackjack sucks. It binds the bolt carrier of all three AKs in the family, causing failures to feed. No such problems with the Buffer Tech.
     
  3. Greg Bell

    Greg Bell Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2003
    Messages:
    754
    Is there any real need for that buffer? Aren't AKs pretty robust? I always fear that they will cause malfunctions.
     
  4. Lawyerman

    Lawyerman Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2003
    Messages:
    261
    Location:
    Texas Panhandle
    I gotta agree, a buffer in an AK? Why? For that matter a buffer in anything but an AK?????
     
  5. KaceCoyote

    KaceCoyote Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Messages:
    1,471
    Location:
    St.Louis Missouri
    All the buffers can lead to premature wear, and often a significant decrease in reliability and action speed.


    Get a muzzlebrake or a smaller caliber.
     
  6. The Scandinavian

    The Scandinavian Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    247
    Location:
    Finland EU
    I have a thin piece of rubber cut from an industrial conveyor belt glued into the back of my receiver. It definately reduces the recoil, and I've never had a malfunction of any kind. So... why not?

    It does make it a little harder to remove the bolt though as I need to compress the rubber slightly to get the bolt far enough back to come off the rails.
     
  7. AK103K

    AK103K Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Messages:
    5,774
    I had a Buffer Tech buffer in my SSR 85-C when I got it. I also had one in my SAR1. Both guns had function troubles with the buffers in. Once removed, all the problems went away.

    If you look at the inside rear of your receiver, I think you will see the lack of any impact wear on its finish. I have 4 AK's of different makes and not one shows any wear on the finish from the bolt hitting it during firing.
     
  8. model 649

    model 649 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Messages:
    544
    I have these in both my SKS and AK....excellent. Noticeably less rattle and possibly less perceived recoil(might be imagining that, however). Check here:

    http://www.sprinco.com/buffed.html

    Just a little pellet of what appears to be urethane into the end of the recoil spring and all is nicer. I just have to remember it's there when I take the guns down cause it'll fall out. No troubles at all with function. AK's and SKS's over-stroke anyway and these make a very small reduction in said stroke for a payoff I like.
    Josh
     
  9. SnP

    SnP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Messages:
    46
    I'm not worried about recoil or anything, the AK is like shooting a .22.

    I just want to the gun to last as long as possible.:)
     
  10. Harry Tuttle

    Harry Tuttle Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2003
    Messages:
    3,093
    AKs are designed for FA lead slinging

    think about that for a moment...
     
  11. beerslurpy

    beerslurpy member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    4,438
    Location:
    Spring Hill, Florida
    7.62x39 AKs are one thing, 12 ga AKs are another. Saiga-12s have been known to destroy receivers when run with magnum loads on the lower gas settings. I put one in my saiga and then decided to throw one in my 30 cal as well. Ive been shooting it for about 2 years no with no reliability problems. Its a buffertech btw.
     
  12. CZguy

    CZguy Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2004
    Messages:
    3,976
    Location:
    Missouri
    I'm glad it works for you.

    I had one in a CZ-75 that deformed and caused jamming. I took it out and it's run flawlessly ever since. Mine was a buffer tech also.
     
  13. clange

    clange Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Messages:
    786
    I agree with beerslurpy, for an S-12 or .308, sure, but a normal AK doesnt need a buffer. If it needed one it would have been designed with one. No reason to stick something weird inside the gun that could even cause reliability problems.

    But to each their own.
     
  14. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    12,785
    Location:
    DFW Area
    I've never heard of nor read about nor experienced any premature wear from a buffer. I'd be interested to see any evidence you have to support this claim.

    They can cause reliability issues but don't always do so. I have used different kinds of buffers in a few of my rifles and pistols (only for range use, never for self-defense) and have experienced no reliability issues that could be directly attributed to the buffers.

    Lastly, the buffers are designed primarily to reduce wear on the gun, not to reduce felt recoil. While they may reduce felt recoil by a marginal amount, that's not the main selling point by a long shot.

    They're not a must by any means, but I have been able to note reduced wear in at least one case, they're cheap and generally pretty easy to install/deinstall. As a result, I use them at the range in some of my more recreationally oriented guns since they've not caused me any problems but recommend STRONGLY that people NOT use them in self-defense guns.
     
  15. CZguy

    CZguy Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2004
    Messages:
    3,976
    Location:
    Missouri
    JohnKSa,

    While reading your post I was wondering, wouldn't felt recoil and wear be reduced by installing a stronger buffer spring?

    Just a thought, has anyone tried this?
     
  16. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    12,785
    Location:
    DFW Area
    Felt recoil will probably be increased by using a stronger recoil spring since it couples the bolt more stiffly to the gun and therefore to you. Or it might reduce the felt recoil by preventing the bolt from hitting the back of the receiver as hard as normal. Depends on the design of the gun and the oomph of the ammo being used.

    A stronger recoil spring can reduce wear due to recoil, but can, on the other hand, increase wear due to the bolt slamming shut more vigorously.

    Design is usually like this. You change something for a benefit and it adversely affects something else. Things tend to be inter-related and the overall outcome of a minor change is often more far-reaching than one expects.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page