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Thinking About a Tavor

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Welding Rod, Jul 22, 2014.

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  1. Welding Rod

    Welding Rod Member

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    After recently getting a FN PS90, I realized I really like some aspects of a bull pup design.... I am now seriously considering a Tavor.

    Any owners or users with some first hand experience / thoughts you would share?

    Thanks
     
  2. briansmithwins

    briansmithwins Member

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    The Tavor is very easy to transition to if you're used to an AR or M16.

    Generally speaking it's a well designed and well made rifle. I'd go with one before a AR for serious work.

    Personally I like the AUG better, but the Tavor would be a close second.

    BSW
     
  3. js8588

    js8588 Member

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    I'll be getting one early next year
     
  4. Revoliver

    Revoliver Member

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    Have a friend that bought one last month. He brought in over for some after work parking lot show and tell. He got the black 16" 'righty' one. It's pretty well made and laid out.

    My only two complaints:

    I still don't like having both my hands damn near on top of each other, but I know this can be overcome.

    The price... just over $2100... can't personally justify that when comparing to the AR.
     
  5. js8588

    js8588 Member

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    The price runs right around $1700
     
  6. Welding Rod

    Welding Rod Member

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    Maybe even a little less on Gun Broker if you watch for a deal.
     
  7. Revoliver

    Revoliver Member

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    Then he got hosed for not shopping around a bit more. Good to see the price is not really that high, makes it much more tempting.
     
  8. js8588

    js8588 Member

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  9. Revoliver

    Revoliver Member

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    Yeah, he bought local, so I'm guessing that the local store's lack of big box store 'juice' at getting better deals from distributors was simply passed along to him. I see many rifles marked too high when comparing to online shopping when rolling around locally.
     
  10. AlexanderA
    • Contributing Member

    AlexanderA Member

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    I think the Tavor is a fad. There's speculation that it could be an "orphan" product before long. Therefore, parts availability could be a problem in the future.

    I have to admit I don't like bullpup designs. The Tavor resembles a knockoff of the Steyr AUG.

    You get a lot more "bang for the buck" with an AR-15.
     
  11. Rob G

    Rob G Member

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    Umm... the military version is the standard issue weapon of the Israeli military. I don't see it going out of production anytime soon.
     
  12. benzy2

    benzy2 Member

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    There are benefits to the bullpup system and the little I've shot the Tavor it seemed like a good enough rifle. That said, I didn't torture it or run it through a high round count.

    Personally, I'm not a bullpup person and wouldn't pay $1700 for one. At $700-$800 I'd grab one to play around but I don't think I could have the confidence in it that I do in a base model Colt LE 6920 to use the rifle for anything serious. If it's relegated to a range toy status (in my mind it is, use it how you please), I have troubles justifying $1700 for that purpose.

    When I match it up to a no frills 16" AR, they are equal in barrel length, the Tavor is heavier by a pound to a pound and a half, and the Tavor is shorter by about 6 inches overall. If it were the same or less weight, it would be great as a hiking/hunting/bug out/etc rifle. But it's heavy and on my back 6 inches of effectively longer barrel length can be packed around but the extra pound and a half can't. Anymore with the Sig pistol brace being legal, I find it hard to not simply buy a 10.5" pistol, toss the brace on, and have a lighter and smaller package than the Tavor as well as parts availability with the most common domestic rifle built today.

    I'm not trying to say the AR is the only good option, but I think it's a better option than the Tavor. The biggest benefit I see from the Tavor is that it is easy to use in a vehicle while still giving you 16" barrel length velocity. That's a situation I won't be using short of the Russians invading. Other than that, if I'm in a spot tight enough to need a sub 30" rifle, a pistol/SBR AR is going to be lighter, potentially more compact, and have parts available for the next 50-100 years, and will still be well within the effective range of the round. Most any situation I can see that I need 16" of barrel length velocity, I'd rather the extra 5-10" (depending on hand guard) of grip distance to stabilize the rifle, though I've never been a fan of both hands being close together.

    If you want to buy a bullpup rather than a pistol AR, the Tavor seems like a quality rifle. It's parts availability makes me nervous and would push me towards someone like Steyr AUG simply because they've been doing it a long time, though it too isn't a light rifle for the compact size. I'd have to do a bit more research on either, their distributors, and their track record for supplying parts though before I made any $1700 choice.
     
  13. Bartholomew Roberts

    Bartholomew Roberts Moderator Emeritus

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    I've compared my 9" AAC MPW with a Tavor side by side. With the stock completely collapsed, the MPW is *maybe* an inch shorter than the Tavor. The Tavor is slightly heavier, depending on the optic mounted on each rifle.

    So you've got a compact firearm that is the size of the shortest MPW; but has the ballistics of a 16" 5.56mm. It doesn't need any NFA paperwork either. I can see a lot to like there - although one issue is there is still some decent muzzle blast from a 16.5" 5.56mm barrel and I've noticed even experienced shooters need a little time to get accustomed to having that moved closer to their face. One advantage .300 has is it does really great about not being blasty, even in a short 9" barrel.
     
  14. PabloJ

    PabloJ member

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    The drawback to the ".300 quiet" is box of ammo >$20/20 and high grade ammo is >$30/20 cartridges. What is truly shocking until relatively recently ammo was made of unobtainium. Unless one needs suppressed gun on job it isn't worth bother.
    I should mention cost of spare magazines and ammo should pretty much decide if firearm is worth purchasing. I would say Tavor is $1200 firearm.
     
  15. Ryanxia

    Ryanxia Member

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    My suggestion if you can swing the money is to get the Timney trigger for it. It's a fairly quick/easy drop in and cuts the trigger pull from like 12lbs down to 4lbs.

    The integrated flip up sights are kind of cheesy, I'd still throw your preferred set of BUIS on it.

    All and all I think the Tavors are pretty neat, of course being left handed there's not of bullpups I really consider.
     
  16. briansmithwins

    briansmithwins Member

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    Externally, sure, but it's more like how birds and bats kinda look alike but aren't that closely related.

    The Tavor uses a long stroke gas piston with a 2 lugged bolt that's similar to a AK rifle. The bolt carrier is similar to the AR18, but with the bolt locking/unlocking cam located on the bolt itself. The load bearing receiver is a stamped steel insert in the stock. Safety is rotating type, like an AR.

    The AUG is a short stroke gas piston system, with a Johnson/Stoner type multi lug bolt, with a unique bolt carrier that uses 2 hollow op rods that also contain the recoil springs. The receiver is cast aluminum with steel inserts for load bearing. The safety is a push thru block.

    But other than that, they are pretty similar.

    BSW
     
  17. ifit

    ifit Member

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    I have shot the steyr aug/fs2000, actually almost ordered the Aug. But once I heard the Tavor hitting the U.S i held off and glad I did....I chose the tavor:)
    imagejpg1_zps68c7728c.jpg
     
  18. Girodin

    Girodin Member

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    I'd be interest to hear a further explanation as to why including your defition of serious work and background in such. I'm particularly interested as the Tavor has not gained many users in terms or LEO or military, particularly among those that can more or less acquire whatever they like.
     
  19. scaatylobo

    scaatylobo Member

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    Joe Montagna

    The outdoor shooting channel just did a show about bullpups.

    Actor and shooter Joe Montagna is the host of that show.

    The Tavor was THE shining light in that show and received the most raves as the final coming of age of the bullpup.

    I had a MSAR,and just could not wrap myself around a fast mag change,no matter what I tried.

    I do not expect to need that skill,but that skill is there nonetheless with all AR / M-4 platform tools I have handled.

    just my 00.02 cents
     
  20. lemaymiami

    lemaymiami Member

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    As a genuine "old dude" I won't ever be in the market for one - but I did greatly enjoy the 30 minute show on the history of bull pup designs that was on Gun Stories tonight (previously referred to in the last post. Anything the Israelis adopt is worth serious consideration in my opinion. Yes, the Tavor was the highlight of the show...

    If you're like me though, whatever your first battle rifle configuration was (no matter how long ago that was....) will probably be your go to preference. I imagine that Austrians and Aussies will prefer an AUG...
     
  21. briansmithwins

    briansmithwins Member

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    Used to work armed security a long time ago, I'd much rather have carried and AUG instead of the 20" shotgun I actually had back then. Since then I've taken a couple rifle classes here and there and took the AUG out this year shooting rabbits in scrub brush. I usually shoot the AUG at our local 'shoot and move' rifle matches. The AUG is what's loaded by the bed at nights.

    Bullpups in general are handier than conventional rifles. Specifically: A 20" AUG in shorter than a 16" AR with the stock fully collapsed, which isn't that usable. The charging handle is in a much superior position and the safety is easier to tell is it's engaged by feel. Since the balance point is right over the grip, it's much easier to carry and point the AUG one handed than a AR. Plus, if the AUG does get dirty and/or dry, I can turn up the amount of gas that's blown into the action.

    But besides that, the AR is better.

    BSW
     
  22. FrankCastleThePunisher

    FrankCastleThePunisher Member

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    I find that I can carry and point my 18" barrel Tavor much easier and longer one handed than my 16" barrel Aug3 CQC. Look at Bullpupforum.com for lots of information on the Tavor and other bullpups.
     
  23. gunnutery

    gunnutery Member

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    Probably because people in those professions have limited income. Outside of the gun enthusiasts, most LEOs won't use something if it's not paid for by the dept. Same goes for training, unless they're being compensated, they're not going to the range.

    I'd love a Tavor, but the cost is too prohibitive, even after the big price drop from MSRP.
     
  24. wacki

    wacki Member

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    Anyone complaining about 300 BLK ammo needs to learn to reload. I reform 5.56 brass and bullets are cheap from Missouri bullet company. For the really price conscious, There are also a ton of good molds out there from NOE, MiHec, ACE and more.
     
  25. JustinJ

    JustinJ Member

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    In addition to what was said, the Tavor is also fairly new. LE has a long established relationship with the AR, many cops are former military as well, so change is not something which would happen over night. Really though, as long as the M4 and M16 are the general infantry rifle of the US armed forces, the police are going to gravitate towards it.
     
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