Thinking of selling 2 revolvers

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by rs525, Jun 18, 2022.

  1. rs525

    rs525 Member

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    After two trips to the range with 4 different revolvers, I've been thinking about selling two of them due to not being that good for me. I took a S&W Model 10-5 4" Pencil Barrel, Smith and Wesson Model 15 4", S&W Model 19 2.5" and 1966 Colt Detective Special 2" with me. The first time I shot 158 grain FMJ rated at 968 fps (JESUS), and 148 grain wadcutters out of them the second time. Of the four, I noticed I was a better shot with the Model 15 and the Model 19, while the fixed sight revolvers were not that accurate. The DS especially was not pleasant to shoot even with wadcutters rated at 710 fps.
    My question is do any of you think I should sell the Model 10 and the Detective Special as it appears my eyes just don't do well at all with fixed sight revolvers compared to adjustable sights. My thing is that I need a gun to "click" with me right away, otherwise I don't see a point in keeping it. Let me know what you think.
     
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  2. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    rs525

    If it were me I would say yeah, if the two fixed sighted guns didn't give me the accuracy potential I could get with the other two adjustable sight models. No sense in driving up the level of frustration you get shooting the Model 10 and the Detective Special if it's just not happening with them. Another plus is that both revolvers should bring you a pretty nice return on your dollar, provided they're in decent condition.
     
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  3. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

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    You cant judge the accuracy of any gun if you only shoot it twice mixed in with shooting other guns
    Even if you shot it more than twice you need to practice with it more plus you are using different ammo, so who knows?
    If you don't like shooting one of them then that's a different story The Colt DS is not meant to be a fun range shooter.
    If you don't carry it, then sure sell it.
     
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  4. rs525

    rs525 Member

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    I should also say i did take the Model 10 one time before the two other trips to the range with 158 grain FMJ rated about 800 fps and even then I wasn't the most accurate with it.
    Man I really wanted to like the Model 10 and DS given their long history and iconic status.
     
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  5. UncleEd

    UncleEd Member

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    I'd sell the Model 10 and the DS........

    ......and then, and then, and then I'd buy
    another Model 15!

    Of course, from the getgo the Model 15 is
    my favorite Smith revolver.
     
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  6. DeepSouth
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    DeepSouth Random Guy

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    I’d keep them. If really didn’t care about them I’d eventually give them away. Probably to a friend or family member that was new to shooting and and broke. That was me at one point, I’ll pay it forward when I get a chance… that’s what I do with guns I don’t really care for.

    I don’t really sell guns though so I may not be the guy to ask.
     
  7. rs525

    rs525 Member

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    I don't have any friends or family members who would interested in firearms.
     
  8. red rick

    red rick Member

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    Nothing wrong with selling a gun that you don’t like .
     
  9. Mark 40
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    Mark 40 Contributing Member

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    Like you, if a gun doesn't do it for me I sell them. I'm not a collector and only keep what I shoot. No safe queens here. Thats what works for me. Other folks I know will never sell a thing. It's really down to how you look at it. The fact that you're considering the possibility of selling you may want to also ask yourself what you would do with the cash.
     
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  10. DeepSouth
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    DeepSouth Random Guy

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    In that case, yeah I’d sell to finance something I’d like more.
     
  11. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

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    you should be able to get a good price for the colt.
     
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  12. Tallball

    Tallball Member

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    1) If you don't like a gun, sell it. There's plenty more out there.

    2) It's hard to shoot handguns with small fixed sights accurately. It's also hard to shoot revolvers accurately shooting double action only.

    3) If you can shoot fixed-sight revolvers, double action only, with good accurately, especially a small one like that Colt, you will be a better shot with all of your other handguns. All it takes is a lot of time and work. :)

    It worked for me. I used to do most of my shooting with my larger handguns that had big adjustable sights. I could shoot my j-frames okay. A shooting buddy showed me by example that by practicing more often and more seriously, you can get a lot better than just okay with snubbies. It's been a few years, and I'm slowly getting better. If I'm having a good day and shooting well, I can now shoot a nice tight group double-action with a snub 38 pretty pretty consistently. If I shoot a bigger handgun with bigger sights after that, it seems a lot easier than it used to.
     
  13. Pat Riot
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    Pat Riot Contributing Member

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    Your guns, do as you please.

    But first, I would try putting a little whiteout or tape on the front sights and see how you do. If that helps then perhaps try something more permanent.
     
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  14. rs525

    rs525 Member

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    I did put some red nail polish on the front sights but it hasn't helped much
     
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  15. ontarget

    ontarget Member

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    I used to be the never sell ANY gun guy. Then I realized over time that I still had a bunch of guns that I really didn't like.
    I have sold and/or traded a few now, and guess what? It didn't hurt a bit.
    Sell or trade the ones that don't float your boat, and roll the money into something else that does.
     
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  16. Pat Riot
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    Pat Riot Contributing Member

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    Well, I guess you’re going to make someone very happy when you sell those guns.
    I do understand about not being able to see certain types of sights. I have had bad eyesight and worn glasses all my life. The worst were on a Springfield 1911. The front sight just evaporated whenever I tried to shoot it.
    I also have a model 10 and a Colt DS. As I was posting I recall that I found that actually blackening the sights to stop them from reflecting ambient light helped with those. It did help a bit on the model 10. Not so much with the Colt.
     
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  17. rs525

    rs525 Member

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    Funny thing is my eye sight is pretty good and I'm relatively young, so I shouldn't have a problem with them. Guess they're just not meant for very low sights.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2022
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  18. Riomouse911

    Riomouse911 Member

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    Some fixed sight guns are regulated for specific loads, such as a standard pressure 158 gr RN for the .38’s you have. (When they were made that was the popular choice.) Other loads shoot higher or lower depending on what you choose to shoot.

    I will admit I shoot my fixed sight guns better with a white-then-orange paint job on the front sights, especially for indoor shooting range use.

    There are some guns, like my nickel Model 49, that have such a brightly finished, narrow front sight that it is impossible to see indoors and almost as bad outside. Since I have several other snub .38’s that fill the role, the Model 49 is now pretty much regulated to the safe.

    Revolvers take practice to shoot well, but like many others I feel that revolver skills translate universally. So, if you put in the time and can shoot a DA revolver well, you should be able to shoot just about anything else.

    Stay safe.
     
  19. UncleEd

    UncleEd Member

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    I am in the "sell" camp but one factor to consider
    is just what are. you expecting from a snubbie
    such as the Detective Special?

    If at contact to 7 yards you can shoot a decent
    group, not a tight group by any means, then
    you and the gun are doing what can be
    expected without tons and tons of practice.

    At closer ranges, it's best perhaps to just look
    over the sights and fire. As long as the gun
    is held properly in the hand, you'll hit.

    That DS is a quick, responsive defensive
    weapon in its primary role.
     
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  20. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    I rarely divest myself of any gun I obtain but also, I do not shoot fixed sight guns very well.

    I'd keep the Colt since it primarily is a short range gun and a Colt but I sell the Model 10. In 38 caliber, I'd rather have an adjustable sight K-frame (Model 14, 15, 19, 66, or 67) than the fixed sight Model 10.

    But, they are your guns to do with what you want.

    An aside, on my S&W 38 Special 2" barreled J-frames, I put rubber grips on them and standard 38 Special ammunition is pleasant to shoot. I still do not like +P ammunition in them. Even so, their small size and light weight do make them recoil a but more than an all metal, 4" barreled revolver.
     
  21. UncleEd

    UncleEd Member

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    RS525,

    Just saw your earlier posting on the DS
    from April 7. Yup, those small stocks
    can be a challenge but you have a fine
    revolver. I now say hang onto it and
    shoot it several times, five or six at
    least, at close ranges. Use standard
    .38 ammo which is what it was made
    for.

    The DS has stood the test of time for
    thousands of police detectives and
    uniformed LEOs as backup pieces or
    off duty.
     
  22. rs525

    rs525 Member

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    Ok, I think I'll try one more time with the Model 10 and DS with 158 grain LRN, but if they don't shoot any better they're going away.
     
  23. Archie

    Archie Member

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    Is it possible you are thinking 'registration' (where the shots are hitting) rather than 'accuracy' (how tight are the groups)? In my experience, fixed sight revolvers - handguns of any flavor - are not specifically 'tighter' shooter due to having adjustable sights. One 'adjust' fixed sights, but it involves small hand files; can't be undone like adjustable sights.
    Aside from my distaste for Colt double action revolvers, short barreled - therefore short sight radius - are typically harder to shoot accurately. Much easier to have what seems like good sight alignment but isn't.
    I would advise against selling just about anything prior to a little more serious testing.
    Model 10 revolvers have always done right by me.
    Any two inch barreled revolver should be considered a 'hideout' gun intended for self-defense or that sort of shooting. If one doesn't need such an arm (and is not a collector) has no real reason to have one. I prefer three inch revolvers to two inch revolvers for concealment anyway.
    All that said, you are the one who (seemingly) chose them and paid for them. You are the one to decide the financial and emotional (self-esteem) feasibility of such actions. Do NOT be rushed.
     
  24. rs525

    rs525 Member

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    And yes I forgot to mention it, but I bought a Model 19-4 Snub Nose a couple months ago. Made in 1980, very good condition, also put the Wolff Springs in it. Just got a pair of vintage Pachmayr Compac grips to replace the tiny round butt Mag Na grips and they feel SO much better. Pictures to come.
     
  25. Beach Bum

    Beach Bum Member

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    starting to lean that way myself , but still haven't pushed the sell button...
     
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