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This is a new one for me

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Eric H, Jan 5, 2018.

  1. Eric H

    Eric H Member

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    This is a 44 magnum fired out of my Winchester trapper. Unknown times reloaded. Was shooting 200 grain rnfp bullets with some blue dot.
    Has anyone jade a straight wall cartridge break like this. The top half was stuck in the chamber. The bottom ejected with no problem. The stuck piece came out without a whole lot of trouble.
     

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  2. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    Yep, enough times to know that a bore brush will normally be enough to remove the top half. A friend had the top half of a .357 Magnum stuck so hard in his Model 73 Winchester Uberti, we had to use CerroSafe to cast a chamber slug and push it out with a bore rod.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
  3. Dudedog

    Dudedog Contributing Member

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    Had a 9mm (one of the ones with the step) do that to me. (unknow number of reloads range brass, felt normal when shot, medium power load)
    Probably not the best way but I got it out with a drill bit just a tiny bit bigger than the ID of the case (and smaller than the OD of course)
    Allowed me to turn the case and get a bite on it then tapped it out from the muzzle with a rod.
    Lucky I could pull the barrel so I had easy access to it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2018
  4. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    Only time I had a straight wallish type of brass separate like that was a 30 Carbine round. Figured it had grown a bit long and I had missed trimming it so the mouth got pinched and case lengthened enough to split. Were you shooting max or near max loads? Wondering out loud if this might have stressed the brass to the point of failure.
     
  5. dgod

    dgod Member

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    I see several of my Favorite GO-TO people here, so here goes, I think you'll enjoy, and maybe get a little giggle at my expense...

    Last summer I had difficulties getting my 5.56 Colt LE, 1;7, 16" to chamber reloads. I checked and rechecked with Case Gauge, Micrometer. Frustration ensued...

    Finally, one day I was getting Pi**ed Off, so I disassembled it, when I ran a rod down the barrel, a very small piece of Neck Brass fell on the cleaning mat. Apparently when this piece of brass broke off (During Firing I'm Guessing), it remained there lurking is the small places. Reassemble of Colt, I sure do make good reloads, just cant fine the little ring that prevented bullet chambering. Why was this not removed during previous cleanings?

    Enjoy, Thanks

    dg
     
  6. Eric H

    Eric H Member

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    I don't think the drill bit idea is bad. You obviously new what you were doing. I don't have tools for everything. But I can re purpose something to do certain things in a pinch.
     
  7. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    It happens, although they usually split lengthwise.

    .32 Mag
    Split .32 Mag Case.JPG

    .38 Spl.
    Split .357 Case.JPG

    Just make sure it didn't happen from over pressure loads.
     
    NewHamshooter and ReloaderFred like this.
  8. Eric H

    Eric H Member

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    The loads were mild. The brass was some stuff I got from a friend. Just wasn't expecting a straight walled pistol case to break right there. I have had plenty that show there age by slitting at the case mouth.
    This was broken like you would see in a bottle neck cartridge when the head separates. It was pretty far above the webbing of the case.
    I figured that there was going to be at least a few folks that have experienced this.
     
  9. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    So we don't know what he subjected them to. Once fired from your buddy? Should be fine. Run hard and put away wet? Hmm. :)

    Incipient case head separation can happen with revolver rounds, it just isn't common. Here are some shared by a member some time back.
    jfh's Seperated .38 Spl Brass - Small - 500x500.JPG
     
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  10. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Sometimes it can be a batch of bad brass, but usually it's just a weak spot in a single case, it happens.
     
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  11. entropy

    entropy Member

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    I've had .38's with wadcutter cannelures split at the cannelure. By 99 times out of 100 they split lengthwise, and more often with Blue Dot.....
     
  12. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    I had one split like that and the front end was very difficult to remove. I tried a brass brush from the muzzle end but the brush almost got stuck in the piece of case. A cleaning rod with a button on the end finally engaged the edge and removed it.
     
  13. Eric H

    Eric H Member

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    I used a jag with a patch and it came out easy. I had just never experienced this with a pistol cartridge. I'm not overly concerned. When I showed it to a couple older buddies of mine. That have been shooting,casting and reloading for more decades than I have been alive.
    They hadn't experienced that in any other than the regular case lenght split that happens when they wear out.
     

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