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This is my snubby

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by romel, Dec 21, 2010.

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  1. romel

    romel Member

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  2. junkman_01

    junkman_01 member

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    That is a '61 NAVY not a '60 Army.
     
  3. pbearperry

    pbearperry Member

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    Cool looking snubby.Give us a video of it belching fire and smoke please.
     
  4. Prairie Dawg

    Prairie Dawg Member

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    Yup, a Navy.
    Armies are all 44 caliber.
    All the same, a nice looking piece.
    --Dawg

    My Snubbies in action:

    [​IMG]
     
  5. mykeal

    mykeal Member

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    A nice looking gun. However, it appears that loading it involves a serious safety violation; the user's hands are directly in line with charged chambers. It's true the nipples are not capped, but this is still a very poor practice. The owner also seems quite cavalier about pointing it at himself and other places he probably does not want to shoot. Yes, I can see it's not loaded, but again, a very poor practice.
     
  6. romel

    romel Member

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    If you notice well side that I am not loading the weapon, I am showing it and for it already I have assured me that was unloaded
     
  7. romel

    romel Member

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    Thank you for the correction in the model, I have a doubt:
    If .36 and .44 are the same it arms but of different calibre ..... because one is Army and other one is Navy??

    A greeting.
     
  8. Hobie

    Hobie Member

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    Oh, yeah, then you will NEVER shoot ANY muzzleloader. Woe is me.
     
  9. Shoot The Moon

    Shoot The Moon Member

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    Yes. As I understand it, Colt's firearms were referred to as being 'of Naval calibre' for .36 or 'Army calibre' for .44

    Good looking gun by the way.. :)
     
  10. Prairie Dawg

    Prairie Dawg Member

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    Yup.
    .36 = Navy
    .44 = Army

    I have my wedges on all my snubbies properly fitted so they come out with finger pressure & I use a Powder Inc. cylinder loader to load 'em up.

    http://www.blackdawgecartridge.com/...hispage=bd_cyl_loader.html&ORDER_ID=!ORDERID!

    Takes only a few minutes at the unloading table to pop the wedge out, pull the barrel & cylinder & load 'em up.
    AND I always get good, consistent loads.
    ---Dawg
     
  11. mykeal

    mykeal Member

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    No, Hobie, actually, I load all my percussion revolvers, single shot muzzleloading pistols, muzzleloading long rifles (percussion and flintlock) and muzzleloading sxs shotguns (all percussion) without putting my hands (or any other part of my body) in front of the muzzle or charged chambers. It's very simple to do, and something I teach in Hunter Safety Education. And I venture to say the vast majority of the members of this board do the same. Every one of the hundreds of individual loadings of long rifles, pistols and revolvers I oversaw at Friendship last year were done that way.

    Now I will admit that using the short starter or ramrod on a single shot pistol or long rifle puts my hands NEAR the muzzle, and if the gun were to discharge I'm sure they'd be burned. But there wouldn't be a hole through the palm like there would be in the case of the OP's method.

    Yes, romel, I noted that you were not actually loading it, only demonstrating. But you were demonstrating a dangerous practice, which was my point. The second rule of firearms safety is: "Never point a gun at something you don't intend to kill." It doesn't say 'loaded gun'. And the first rule of firearms safety is: "Always treat every gun as if it were loaded." You violated both rules.
     
  12. romel

    romel Member

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    Thank you for his advices friend, but always I have thought that to the firearms it is necessary to respect but not be afraid of them them.
     
  13. lobo9er

    lobo9er Member

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    how is it you load your muzzle loader. without stuffing the rod down the barrel with your hand
     
  14. SixxshootinSam

    SixxshootinSam Member

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    Kinda curious as well as to how one loads a muzzleloader without having your hand over the muzzle at any time.
    I agree, there is a certain measure of safety that should be involved with handling your gun, but after I have inspected a gun and know it's not loaded im no longer treating it as loaded, unless there are people nearby that do not know this.
     
  15. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    Mykeal, the only way to load a C&B revolver without breaking your rule would be to remove the cylinder and use a loading press and mystical hand gestures that avoid passing any body parts over the zone above the cylinder openings. And then when handling and replacing the cylinder into the gun to observe control over where the chambers are pointed fully as if the cylinder was a loaded gun itself.

    It is impossible to load an assembled revolver using the loading ram of the gun itself without putting one or both hands in front of the already charged chambers. A practice which seems to be widely accepted as safe.
     
  16. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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  17. mykeal

    mykeal Member

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    Oh come on. You're telling me it's perfectly ok to put your palm completely covering the muzzle of a gun with charged chambers. You know the OP's demonstration of loading his gun by placing his hand over the muzzle is utterly and completely unsafe, and then to compound the violation he points it at the camera and then himself. And then he puts this film of himself violating two basic safety rules on the internet so all the anti-gun nuts can use it to demonstrate how unsafe we are, and kids can see that, as long as you 'know' it's not loaded you can go ahead and point it anywhere you want.

    Never point a gun at something you don't intend to kill.

    Always treat every gun as a loaded gun.

    Two very basic principles we've all heard from the very first day. But hey, since it's necessary to have your hands NEAR - not completely over - the chamber openings for a brief second, well then I guess they don't apply to you guys. You're bullet proof or something, eh? There's a world of difference between using two fingers to unlatch the loading lever and placing your palm over the muzzle, fully covering all five chamber openings; you know that, but hey, it's a good excuse to justify intentionally violating safety rules, so what the heck. What other unsafe practices do you use this to justify?
     
  18. romel

    romel Member

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    Hello BHP

    I also had a Catleman of muzzleloader, it is a great revolver.
     

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  19. Vermonter

    Vermonter Member

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    Well said Mykeal. Safety first.
     
  20. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    ''Hello BHP, I also had a Cattleman of muzzleloader, it is a great revolver...''
    Sweet! My little Thunderer [to the right in my photo] is a .357 Magnum, but I usually stick to .38's. I had a couple of the 1873 percussion revolvers, made by Pietta, I believe, but they went in a trade for one of my Trapdoor .45-70's.
     
  21. romel

    romel Member

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    As you are making the burden of his revolver??? Used blackpowder 3F or 4F? Put taco between the gunpowder and the bullet? Used round ball or bullet?
     
  22. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    Again I'll ask... How can you load a cap and ball pistol cylinder in the gun's frame without putting your hands in front of the already loaded chambers?

    To get the leverage needed to ram the ball home one hand has to firmly grasp the barrel and the other the loading lever. The one holding the barrel is therefore directly in line with the chambers that are already loaded. There is just no way to do this otherwise that I can see.

    I suppose one could try holding the pistol grip during all this but that provides really poor leverage and pistol control. I can see pistols flying out of hands and other ills from trying to do this job in such a manner.

    Even if a loading press is used if the gun in question is an 1851 or 1860 then again it is impossible to place the barrel back on in front of the gun after the cylinder is in place without exposing much of one's hand to the chamber mouths. The ONLY C&B pistol that could be loaded safely where no body part ever passes in front of the cylinder chambers would be a Remington style where the cylinder could be loaded in a press and transferred to the frame all without ever having a body part in front of the cylinder.

    I'm all for safety. And certainly once the gun is placed for capping nothing of flesh and blood is put in front or even near the front face of the cylinder or barrel.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2010
  23. Prairie Dawg

    Prairie Dawg Member

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    If this .36 were mine, my load would be 15-17 grains FFFg black powder, a felt wad greased with Gatofeo's lube, a .375 roundball.
    Accurate & lotsa boom & smoke.
    --Dawg
     
  24. SixxshootinSam

    SixxshootinSam Member

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    Talk about overzealous 'gun safety'. At my gun club I shoot with several other BP shooters and they certainly don't handle the guns like Mykeal describes. These are ex LEO's, vets and licensed instructors. A gun is a tool and not to be treated like you're afraid of it.
    They too would like to know how you load a muzzleloader long gun or singleshot pistol without putting your hand right over the barrel as you stuff the ball and patch down.
    Also, pointing a gun at a camera is breaking the rules? I'm pretty sure people that take a pic of their bore with a camera would do it away from their face. If not, well there's survival of the smartest for ya.
     
  25. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

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    I defy that uncapped revolver to go off and shoot you by itself.
     
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