Thoughts on why I have a single stage and turret presses

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by webrx, Nov 27, 2021.

  1. webrx
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    webrx Contributing Member

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    I have read a bunch of threads on "First Presses" recently, maybe because events of the last year have raised ammo prices, maybe because people have more time, maybe it is a trend toward preparedness or self sufficiency.

    I have an RCBS single stage and a Lee Classic Turret (4 hole) and I was recently pondering a progressive press but alked myself out of it. For me, since I load multiple calibers and I have no need to load a lot of any one type of ammo super fast it just does not make sense to move away from what I have.

    So why write this (novel - sorry) up?

    Well, partially because I wanted to review (for myself) my reasoning for staying with a combo of a SS and a Turret, and partially because I was hoping some progressive users would chime in and provide their thoughts (pros and cons) of progressive presses, and partially because I wanted to give a little food for thought to new re-loaders who might be pondering what to get for their first press.

    Executive Summary
    Turret is faster then Single stage
    If I could only have one press "I" would probably still buy a Single Stage because I like to shoot rifle at distance (I think I personally make more accurate ammo on an SS)
    If I only shot 9mm and .223, I would only have a turret, and if I shot a lot of it, I would probably buy a progressive (or two) and set them up to volume reload

    I learned on a single stage, batch mode, my process has been to go to the range, shoot, collect brass, bring it home and throw it in a tumbler to clean it up. I don't usually deprime first, because I use walnut to clean and it was always getting stuck in the flash hole, and tbh, it does not really clean the primer pockets well anyway.

    Once cleaned, I would de-prime with a universal de-priming die, then clean the primer pockets by hand with a primer pocket tool (tried several - Lee, RCBS, Lyman) I like the RCBS with brushes best I guess, but they all work. At this point, if it is pistol, it goes in a ready to reload bucket, and Rifle gets thrown in a ready to trim bucket.

    Trimming I do by hand right now, lee case cutter on an old 12v ryobi drill and the lock stud goes into a bench vice, then I cycle through my brass that I need to trim. I am seriously considering a "case prep" solution if you have a recommendation as this seems to be the most tedious part of my process.

    For the record, I still primarily reload rifle, 6.5, 30-30, 243, etc on the single stage, i think, and I may be wrong, that it has a more solid foundation, aka, when I seat the bullet, they all stay pretty much the same length, not a lot of movement, etc. This feels more accurate to me, more repeatable. With the turret, probably because it rotates, there is some built in slop IMO so I feel it is not the best way to load for accuracy, especially when reaching out to any significant distance, although even at a couple hundred yards changes in velocity can affect my accuracy if I am shooting paper, steel, not so much i guess.

    At this point when using an SS, it is all pretty much the same process for both on an SS, so back to my process,
    Start with 50 pieces of brass
    A. Resize and prime all 50 rounds (on press), inspect primer, then case goes in a bullet tray, Change Die
    B. Powder through expanding die to add powder (funnel on top of die). I weigh every load, i know this seems like overkill to some, but, my method is to set my Lee Perfect Powder measure to the desired weight (check a dozen or so to get my rhythm, then put a powder pan on the scale, tare it to zero, move pan to LPP, drop a charge into a powder pan, put it back on the scale to make sure it is where I want it to be, if light, I will trickle a little in, if heavy, I will trickle a little out of the pan into a "dish" that I can use to trickle powder in if needed, pour the powder from pan into the funnel on the die, tap the funnel a time or two with the pan, look in the brass to check powder and put it into a second bullet tray. Change die
    C. Set and Seat bullet (seat and crimp if I don't have an FCD for caliber), Change die if I have an FCD
    D. Crimp (if I have an FCD)
    E. wipe the round off with a cotton rag to remove any lube, finger grease, etc and put in my ammo box x 50 rounds.

    For pistol and .223 (AR range fodder), I use the turret, set up the dies where I want them, and do the exact same steps above only, every time I pull the handle the turret rotates to the next step and I skip the number of times I am handling the brass, putting it in a tray, etc

    A. Pull handle to resize and prime on press, lift handle to rotate,
    B. pull to expand, get charge, weigh, drop in funnel, tap, lift handle to rotate
    C. look n case to verify load (flexible light set up to see), set bullet on brass and pull handle to seat (seat and crimp if no FCD), lift to rotate (twice if I don't have an FCD to get back to stage one),
    D. Crimp with FCD if available, lift handle, remove round, wipe off with rag and put in ammo box.
    E. Repeat A-D

    The turret is faster for me which is why I use it for pistol and .223 ammo, my son, wife, and I will shoot up several hundred 9mm, .380, .223, at a range session so this is where the bulk of my reloading is done (Range ammo) and the only reason I really bought a Turret press.

    My wife and son do not go to the range as often as I do, and when I go, I shoot rifle for accuracy on most days, and may, on a good day go through 100-150 rounds of 6.5 or .223 target in a few hours. so in 2-3 hours on the press and I can replenish my rifle ammo.

    So, that is my process and why I own both an SS and a Turret press. If I were shooting a lot more 9mm or .223 I would consider a progressive or two set up in those calibers, but I have had no issue keeping up with reloading (especially during this "crisis" of the last couple years where we don't shoot as often). I have a question below on Squibs (myth maybe but something I heard or read somewhere)

    Questions:
    What is your process?

    Is there something you think I should change in mine to be more efficient?

    At what point (volume per week or month) do you think it becomes worthwhile to get a progressive, or is there some other factor I am not considering?

    I think I can shave a bit of time off my rifle reloading with a case prep station, so, that is where I am probably going to invest next - any recommendations?

    Last - myth or reality - (knock on wood - I have never had a squib from one of my reloads) since progressives move so fast and are so automated, is there really a higher likelihood that you will haver a short powder dump that could result in a Squib using a progressive?

    Dave
     
  2. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

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    The main difference between a turret and a AP is with a AP once the stations are full, you produce 1 round for every stroke. With a SS or turret your still doing the same number of strokes. The only thing a turret saves you, is changing dies. If your SS press has a bushing system it only takes a few seconds to change dies. If not you only looking at 30-60 sec to screw a die out and back in.
     
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  3. mdi

    mdi Member

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    I chose a turret press, Lee, not for speed of rounds per hour, but for die storage (the set kept together in one piece). Ease of die swap maybe 5 seconds), and ease of operation. I disabled the auto index a few days after I set it up (I was adjusting dies and the turret kept moving so I took out that little plastic thingy and hand indexed for 20 years). I didn't want a progressive, or semi-progressive as I enjoy reloading (I used a friend's Dillon a few times and I felt like I was "disconnected" from reloading). I reloaded 32 ACP through 30-06 for a few thousand rounds quite successfully...
     
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  4. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    You cannot really compare a Lee Turret press with those from Redding, Lyman, or RCBS. The main difference is the Lee has an auto index feature that allows one to create one round of ammunition with several pulls of the handle without removing the case from the press until it is complete.

    The other turret presses require the operator to manually index the turret.

    The Lee turret press aside, the other turrets are expensive and, in my opinion, do not have any major advantages over a good single stage press except, maybe, a place to store your dies. With a turret press, I'd do batch processing of the cases at one station before indexing the turret to do the next operation. Does it really take that long to replace a die on a single stage press if the lock rings are properly adjusted?

    Turret presses are expensive when compared to single stage presses and additional turret heads are also expensive. RCBS' turret head is $63.

    I'd take the money saved by buying a good single stage press and spend it on other reloading gear.

    As I have already said, the Lee turret press with its auto indexing feature has some advantages. I'm not impressed with the Lee turret press but many folks like them and the OP already has one. So, the OP has experience with the press.

    I'd still choose a good single stage press.
     
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  5. tightgroup tiger

    tightgroup tiger Member

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    If you have to wonder if you need a progressive press, you don't need one yet.

    When I bought my first one it was a " I have to do something different or quit reloading" decision. I was spending hours a night to try to keep up with loading the 9mm and .357 mag loads and I developed elbow problems doing it.

    I went from being a slave to a single stage to running my Hornady LNL-AP once every couple weeks and having more ammo than I can shoot.
    Believe me, if you need to wonder, you don't need one.

    Wanting one is a different issue, but you said need.
     
  6. scotty

    scotty Member

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    I started with an RCBS Rock Chucker reloading kit more than 20 years ago. The kit came with powder measure, case trimmer, scale, etc. It performed well and still does. A year or so later I got bitten by the USPSA pistol shooting bug. All of a sudden it became real work to keep up with my shooting. Between practice and matches, I was going through 1200 or more rounds a month. I soon got tired of loading for 3 hours and shooting for one hour. A bit of an exaggeration, but not by much.

    So I bought a progressive, a Dillon 550B. Once I got the hang of it, I could get everything out, verify that it was throwing proper charges and was otherwise working properly (I'm rather anal about reloading), load 1000 rounds, and put everything away in about 3 hours. This was when I was reloading in the garage, I'm now doing it in the house.

    I still use both presses, the RCBS for rifle loads and for pistol loads that I'm working up and only want small quantities of each load. I generally won't bother firing up the 550 unless I'm going to load 300 or more rounds. I have a complete setup for the 550 in .223 and .308 but have never used them. I prefer to use the RCBS for these and other rifle cartridges.

    I have since thought about getting a turret press or a better single stage (Forster comes to mind), but have not yet pulled the trigger.
     
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  7. westernrover

    westernrover Member

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    I had a LCT, then got a progressive with a case feeder, powder drop, and bullet feeder, and then I got a single stage. In the distant past, I also had a MEC progressive shotshell press and a Rock Chucker. I started with those simultaneously as my first presses. The point being, there has not been a progression from one type of press to another, but all along I have used all kinds of presses and I have not used one type in lieu of another for the lack of having a choice. I have an arbor press too, but don't use it because there aren't dies available for the cartridges I load most. I think if I were very serious about bullet seating, I would get one of those AMP presses with the motor-driven ram and load cell that puts out a force/distance graph so seating resistance profiles can be matched -- neat, but not something I have a real need for.

    For a little while I loaded some handgun cartridges... probably about 15,000 on a progressive press during two years. Then I started to get more meticulous about how I did everything. Taking my time to do a good job with cleaning, annealing, and lubricating before I resize, I want to decap first. Decapping 1000, 2000 cases in a sitting without a case feeder is lame. Taking inexpensive handgun brass that is shot in high volumes and processing it in small batches is a waste of time. I like to prep enough brass that I only need to do it a few times a year for as much as I shoot.

    I unload the brass after decapping to clean, anneal, and lubricate, and then I load it again to size it, and then unload it again to trim it, and then load it again to expand (handgun case) mouths. So the case feeder is a big helper when doing large batches. Lots of progressive die stations is not a useful feature to me, just the case feeder and ejector. If I didn't already have a progressive, I'd get an APP.

    At one point, I loaded over 2000 rifle cartridges, mostly because I was reloading for other family members. I did a lot of those on a progressive. We probably only shot 500 rifle cartridges this year, partly because of the primer shortage and partly because a refresher is all we needed to get our skills for hunting up to par. I did all those on a single stage. I don't think I will ever load rifle cartridges on a progressive again. I'm migrating toward more costly rifle cartridges and shooting less and less.

    Once my handgun brass is trimmed, chamfered, deburred, and expanded, I prime it (off press) and store it. I don't load it the rest of the way until just before I shoot it. I keep just a few hundred ready to go. I also keep about 1000 in reserve in the event I take a class.

    I measure ball powders by volume with a Harrell's powder measure and this covers the vast majority of what I reload. If I am loading extruded powder, I will hand trickle onto a beam scale. I have two powder measures for the progressive press, and I retired them both. Not only are they imprecise about the powder charges they drop, but they also smash the case mouth. Since I was already unloading cases after decapping to clean, anneal, and lubricate, and then unloading cases to trim and then unloading cases again to charge with powder, the multiple die stations of a progressive (or a turret) lost value. What does still have substantial value is the case feeder/ejector.

    I would prefer to seat on an arbor press (or the AMP press) but since there aren't chamber type seating dies for the cartridges I load most, I prefer the single stage over a progressive or turret. Nowadays, I seat even handgun bullets on the single stage. I learned to pick a cartridge from the block and with the same fingers, pull the catridge out of the shell holder and then put the other cartridge in my fingers into the shell holder. While one hand is returning the finished cartridge to a block and picking another ready one, the other hand is pulling the press handle. It's not as good as a good case feeder, but I can be pretty efficient. I crimp (revolver cartridges) the same way because dropping loaded, uncrimped cartridges in the feeder tubes would smash the bullets deeper. This is the only place I can see using a Turret press in my workflow. I did consider buying two seating dies and two crimp dies so I could put a cartridge in and pull the handle twice to seat and crimp (with the auto-indexing LCT). Then the second pair of dies would be ready for the next cartridge. I decided instead to replace my LCT with a progressive press. As it stands now, I prefer to seat on a single stage or arbor press and crimping (which I only do for revolver) on the single stage is fine.

    I suppose that if a person goes to elaborate lengths to outfit a progressive press it may be possible to produce ammo of similar quality to that produced with many of the operations performed off the press. To do that for several substantially different cartridges (like 32 ACP and 300 WBY) is going to increase the cost or setup time even more. I'm sure the effort and expense is worth it to some, but for me the single stage is the basis for the best quality ammo the most efficiently with respect to time and cost. A case feeder/ejector is for me much more helpful than progressive die stations. If I didn't have a progressive press with a case feeder, I would try the APP for those chores that can be loaded from a case feeder: decapping, sizing straight-wall cartridges, and expanding case mouths. I have not tried it, but I am somewhat skeptical that it would substitute for the precision of a single stage press for sizing rifle brass shoulders and necks, or for bullet seating. I suppose it would be suitable for crimping but in that operation the case feeder is not practical and therefore it has no advantage.
     
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  8. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    These are on sale at MidSouth Shooters Supply right now…;)
    [​IMG]

    It isn’t about the volume one shoots, it’s the value of one’s time. And like @tightgroup tiger, the value of my shoulder cartilage. I’m going to want it for shooting, not handloading. Even though it’s maybe a bigger hobby for me.:oops:

    The Lee APP is also on sale, a pistol case marvel. It’s still the same numbers of pulls as a single stage, but self loading and quick.

    Myth. The machine is driven by the human. If it is so fast you can not look into each case, slow down.
    I have ordered a light set to see by, and I will refuse to pull the handle on a case I cannot see into. Problem solved. :D


    I propose a case prep center would be the best new tool for your bench. You suggested it yourself. Your process is sound. It would save you time and effort.
    I like the Hornady Prep Station because it is everything together.
    I don’t have one because I shoot a lot of pistol cartridges and don’t need a lot of trimming done.(Hence the AP.)
    And it’s expensive. There are cheaper ones, and a drill can accomplish much of it, but the work flows better on a station.
    It’s like a turret for the mundane tasks.:)
     
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  9. kidneyboy

    kidneyboy Member

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    My process is very similar to yours using a single stage and the LCT. It is efficient enough for me. I batch reload almost everyday but only for an hour or 2 at a time. I can produce enough rounds this way to stay slightly ahead of my usage.
    After a couple of years of thinking about it this year I bought the Lee auto breech lock pro specifically to load 45acp, which is probably half of my reloading. It has been a good decision. I still reload in 50 or 100 round batches with it but it is a much faster process.

    This is worth repeating.

    Your squib is coming. Hardly any reloader escapes the squib.
     
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  10. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    People say this a lot, and it’s simply not true.

    Die changeover time is diluted by the volume of rounds being loaded - using 3 dies with 2 changeovers to load 200-1000 rounds equates to a near zero amount of time.

    HOWEVER...

    A turret press saves the time of moving cases in and out of the press, which adds work-time to process linearly with batch volume, and is a significant portion of the overall loading process. Have a spectator run a pair of stop watches the next time you load on a single stage, one continuous clock, and one which is started and stopped to ONLY run when there is a case in the shellholder. The majority of total process time is spent in hand moving, transferring cases in and out of the press.

    A turret press eliminates some of that transfer time, reducing nearly-proportionately the total process time.

    Yes, a turret press includes the same number of strokes as a single stage, but yes, a turret press can be and commonly is SIGNIFICANTLY faster in total process time than a single stage.
     
  11. GW Staar

    GW Staar Member

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    Maybe it's an age thing. I've been doing this for a lot of years. Speed is important to me for another reason......I want to get it done before things start hurting...;) I am not interested in loading a thousand rounds with 3000 or 4000 pulls on the press lever. Actually, more like 4000 or 5000. With a single or a turret that is just a fact you can't get around, period.

    I bought my progressives for ONE purpose......to speed things up and to preserve.......me. Not interested in turrets....the wear on the user is the same.

    Ammunition quality-wise. Only a benchrester would notice the difference......my ammo is just fine for anything else, better than most commercial. You want to benchrest? I suggest you put away your progressive, turret or single and buy an arbor press.....or go home.....you won't win.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2021
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  12. Steve S.

    Steve S. Member

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    I have a SS RCBS that is just fine for me; I have never needed any kind of large volume or speed so a step up to any multiple stage press is academic for my needs. However, if I shot the volume as spoken by some here, both the reloading and the shooting would become work for me. I love the shooting hobby, but not enough to reload or even shoot that much. For the casual shooter like me, a SS is just dandy.
     
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  13. webrx
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    webrx Contributing Member

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    Interesting, and obviously not conclusive, but so far on the Squib poll I have going, about 58% of reloaders have never had a squib, and almost every squib that has occurred has been user error and traceable to interruption during reloading.

    just an FYI

    d
     
  14. Charlie98

    Charlie98 Member

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    Presses are just a tool, and their use reflects what the end user (you) require out of a press.

    Back Home, Years Ago, my little RCBS RS3 single-stage WAS my high volume press... because that was all I had. I had my process down for the high volume cartridges, that's for sure.

    These days, I have a progressive side by side on the bench with my progressive... they both still get used, in different capacities; actually, I have 3 single-stage presses, they all serve a different purpose in different locations. Nothing beats a single-stage for small prep work, or small lots of cartridges, although I could see where a turret would work just as well, too... perhaps even better.
     
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  15. webrx
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    webrx Contributing Member

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    I don't think I mentioned this above (I just reread my book), but I got the turret for Christmas one year and it set in the box for quite a bit until one day I decided to set it up to load up a bunch of 9mm brass I had in a bucket.
    I have to agree with Varminterror, the auto indexing turret is significantly faster, and it is more than just the time changing out dies. I have to move the brass in and out quite a bit with the SS, each piece of brass goes onto the press, and back into the block every time you change dies for the next operation, and you only have to handle it once to put it on the press and once to take off the completed bullet, with the self indexing turret.

    I have an auto drum which I thought might help me speed up the drop and weigh portion but, I guess I am too anal to use it directly on the press still. I want to be sure of the powder load and want to drop/weigh each load still, been that way for many years and am not ready to change.

    I have the PPM set up on its own stand, maybe I will set the auto drum up on it's own stand also to see how accurate it drops the powders I use (rifle and pistol) to see how it does. If it is more accurate than what I use now (PPM and trickle) than I can use it for the drop part of my process instead of the PPM.

    d
     
  16. dh1633pm
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    dh1633pm Contributing Member

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    Co-Ax for me just works. All the progressives require a great deal of my time figuring out the setup, the terminology and then making everything works as planned. I just don't shoot enough for that. There are many who do, just not me. I store all my brass resized and cleaned already. Just prime, fill, and go. I work at it a little at a time til each job is done.
     
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  17. kidneyboy

    kidneyboy Member

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    Interesting. After years of trying different setups I am most comfortable dropping powder in a primed case and then running it through the press. I use a Lee Deluxe Perfect Powder Measure mounted on a stand next to the LCT or the ABLP.
     
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  18. Theinkman

    Theinkman Member

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    Started with a Rockchucker in the mid-eighties and loaded a lot of rounds with that. Got out of reloading while I moved about the country for work. Got back into it about 5 years ago when my FIL gave me an RCBS turret he no longer used. This I use exclusively for handgun and decapping all my brass. For rifle I use a MEC Marksman single stage. This setup works really well for me. Not a high volume shooter. I enjoy reloading as much as I enjoy shooting.
     
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  19. Mk-211

    Mk-211 Member

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    I thought that most people had two presses (single stage and progressive) for testing out loads made on the SS and then when happy, transferred them to the progressive.

    At least that's why I have 2 presses, plus you can use the SS to make match rounds. You can still do it on a progressive but the SS will get you better results. You can also buy multiple SS presses and set them up to load one caliber. A friend of mine does this and he's an 06 FFL, says it works great for what he dies.

    So, there are many reasons to have multiple presses when you load. Just comes down to how much you reload and how much time you have to reload. Multiple presses will save you time when it comes to reloading.
     
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  20. CraigC
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    CraigC Sixgun Nut

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    I chose the RCBS turret as my first press and would do so again. IMHO, it does save a significant amount of time over a single stage. Especially when doing small batches during load development. Maybe it's not huge but it feels like it when you're doing something you consider a necessary chore. Handloading is not something I do for the enjoyment of it. I do it because I enjoy shooting.
     
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  21. Airborne Falcon
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    Airborne Falcon Contributing Member

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    Anything I might add, as an ardent and long time user of a Redding T7, would only be redundant but I will say that anyone who claims a turret press is only good for storing dies may wish to rethink their position.

    1 - you seat your case in your shellholder only once with a turret press in most cases.
    2 - you might set a complete die set to optimum depths for a favorite load and not have to worry about it again for a 1000 rounds or more.
    3 - turret presses are, imho, much more conducive-to crafting accurate precise loads en masse than any progressive could ever hope to be.

    There are other reasons already mentioned in this thread but those are three more to add the the list.

    I ran a 650 for years when shooting ipsc and idpa ... but only for pistol. I never trusted powder measures enough to run 5.56 pr 7.62×51 on the 650 ... even with modern checks and warning systems attached.

    I sold the 650 for what I paid for it last year and I may step into another newer progressive by Dillon (750) or maybe even a MK7 or something but to anyone complaining about the cost of a Redding T7 spare head ... when was the last time you priced the cost of a CCK for any of the major progressives? Or worse yet a tool head for any of the major progressives? And add-ons are nuts these days.

    I guess the point I'm trying to make is with regard to cost per lever pull. No one ever mentions that but it's the way I think and I've been pulling press levers since the mid 70s. The best cost per lever pull is, without a doubt, any of several good turret presses. That applies to most of us. There are rare exceptions where someone may be such a volume shooter that progressives pay-off over time ... but for most of us turret presses are the best of all three worlds. Speed, accuracy and time-saving.

    Besides, who can afford to feed a progressive these days?

    And oh, there are still cartridges I only reload on my Rock Chuckers. 45-70, 35 Rem, 338 MX, my long range .308 stuff rolled specifically for one rifle, 30/30, 30.06, etc. Basically anything that I'm not running a lot of ... say 100 rounds or less, I run those through a couple of old Rock Chuckers in sort of a station by station process.
     
  22. GW Staar

    GW Staar Member

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    Location:
    New Mexico and Proud American
    I can relate to all of you, except the ones who use a progressive to load thousands each weekend. Heck! I never did that when I was younger and physically could.;) I have two progressives, one for rifle (mostly 223 and 308), and one for pistol (the main 4 ... 9mm, 40s&w, .357mag, and .45acp.) ....and two singles for load development, and the "other" calibers.....I use the R.C. for sizing and expanding, the Summit for seating.......if I add a bench, I might even add a Rebel. Oh! Can't forget the APP processing press for speeding up prep. (Why did it take so long to add a feeder to a single stage press?)

    Even single stage presses use dies, set-screwed for repeatable loads.....but any press has to have dies set up for a particular load.....whether set-screwed and waiting in a box, or set-screwed and waiting in a turret, or set screwed and waiting in a progressive's tool head. The biggest pain is changing bullets and loads for ANY press. Some buy a die set for every bullet weight and style ...... (and I don't doubt that some buy a turret or tool head for every bullet weight and style) And then there's powder measures....how many of those are you willing to buy, to save time.....

    Yet all of us find a happy medium that pleases us. For me, the progressives just make time in the reloading room shorter and more pleasant......as much as I have enjoyed reloading, what I most enjoy is getting it done before fatigue makes me grumpy.....my wife appreciates that.

    Benchresters are another breed entirely......really patient souls......and I'm not one of those. I have a friend who is very good at benchrest shooting.....told him, "I should come and watch one of your shoots".....to which he replied, "It's not much of a spectator sport." He's right....I'd only distract him.....:)
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2021
    cfullgraf, webrx and Soonerpesek like this.
  23. peeplwtchr

    peeplwtchr Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2019
    Messages:
    1,232
    I have a lee turret for 9mm. If I focus, I can produce a round in about 7 seconds, sometimes faster. I am wondering if a progressive really is faster if you include the loading of the primer holder and case holder for the progressive?

    I'll probably still get a progressive, because I don't want to pull the handle 4 times for every round anymore. I shoot alot per week.
     
  24. Kaldor

    Kaldor Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2015
    Messages:
    1,029
    "about 58% of reloaders have never had a squib, and almost every squib that has occurred has been user error and traceable to interruption during reloading"

    This is absolutely truthful. Ive had one squib, and I know it was because my kids interrupted me. I half stroked my LnL and loaded a single squib.
     
    webrx likes this.
  25. GW Staar

    GW Staar Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    Messages:
    2,878
    Location:
    New Mexico and Proud American
    When I had my kids at home.....they never bothered me. Why so lucky? My loading room is in the garage. I always have work for my kids to do in the garage. When they showed up, they were put to work. Bet you can guess why when Dad was in the garage the kids were scarce.

    My wife knew not to bother me when reloading....my master bedroom is on the second story right on top of the reloading room.....I showed her the famous picture of primer tubes going through the ceiling.....think that might have helped. Also helps that I never bother her while she's quilting. I'm of the opinion that happy families have to respect each other's space.....that includes me respecting my kids' space.

    No squibs for me yet......but then I probably don't load at the volume many of you do either. But I'm getting up in years.....may be in my spacey future.......
     
    webrx, NR53, peeplwtchr and 1 other person like this.
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