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Tiny rust spots on a stainless P95.

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by SGW42, May 29, 2011.

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  1. SGW42

    SGW42 Member

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    Picked up a new toy last Friday, a used KP95PR from the local pawn. It came with the previous owner's nylon shoulder holster. I saw these tiny spots when I was looking the gun over and I thought I could scrub them out with some CLP and a brass brush, but that didn't work.

    I hope they show up well enough in this picture:
    DSCN0643.jpg

    The very tiny spots are all over the top strap and the front of the sides of the slide. I can only guess the last guy carried this thing in his shoulder rig all day and let it sit inside it when he took it off.

    How does one go about cleaning this? I am hesitant because Ruger's marketing department says they have a proprietary finish on their stainless P95s. The finish does feel more like a frying pan than the other stainless guns I have.

    Or should I not worry about them? I'm going to shoot the living daylights out of it either way.
     
  2. xr1200

    xr1200 Member

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    Try some kitchen cleanser on an old sock, it will remove light discoloration or 0000 steel wool and oil or any soft abravise like automotive paint polishing compound etc.

    The problem is you live in a salty environment and your stainless steel guns will rust even faster then carbon steel. Note stainless steel is not rust proof it is only rust resistant. Keep your stainless guns oiled to.
     
  3. Ramone

    Ramone Member

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    Barkeepers Friend:

    http://www.barkeepersfriend.com/

    Best rust remover ever- I live on a boat, and I know more-than-a-little about dealing with rust.

    NEVER NEVER use steel wool- it's likely what made the little spots to begin with- it'll leave little bits of steel behind.
     
  4. Got_Lead?

    Got_Lead? Member

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    Ditto on the steel wool, unless it's stainless steel wool. Regular steel wool will in fact leave carbon steel deposits which will react galvanically with the stainless and rust. This is why stainless steel is pickeled in acid after welding, to remove any residue of low alloy steel, which would react with the stainless and form rust and pitting.

    Stainless gun steel will in fact rust, not as easily as blued steel, but it will still rust. I used to carry my stainless Ruger Secuity Six on every hunting and fishing trip I would go on, never thought to clean under the grips. One day I took them off, and there was a light bit of rust forming, nothing a little 600 wet/dry wouldn't remove.

    It looks like the top of your P-95 is bead blasted. Scotch-brite, or other abraisive will scratch the finish, probably not recommended.

    The spots you show in the photo don't look too bad, and probably won't grow. I've had pretty good luck removing rust from steel using a bit of Hoppies and a bronze bore brush. If that doesn't work, and you really really need those spots gone, a light bead balsting will take them right off.
     
  5. Got_Lead?

    Got_Lead? Member

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    On second thought, if it does have a finish over the steel, probably better to leave it alone, or call Ruger.

    I've fixed a few things in my lifetime, and every now and then I mess a few up.
     
  6. Apocalypse-Now

    Apocalypse-Now Member

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    ^^yep, call ruger. probably just give you a new slide :)
     
  7. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    You could just have the slide bead blasted.
     
  8. Jolly Rogers

    Jolly Rogers Member

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    Bead or abrasive blast with FRESH abrasive media.
    It may have been blasted by the previous owner with used media that can cause the imbedded ferrous particles to rust. Just like using steel wool can.
    Joe
     
  9. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    True,I just assumed....
     
  10. Ramone

    Ramone Member

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    BARKEEPERS FRIEND!

    1.98 at Home Despot, and about the same at supermarkets that carry it-

    While it *is* a mild abrasive, it contains Oxyilic acid <sp?>, which will remove the rust without harming the finish. wet a sponge or rag, shake a little on, gently polish.

    I use this stuff on teak, fiberglass, whatever- removes the rust, leaves the rest!
     
  11. xr1200

    xr1200 Member

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    0000 steel wool either, stainless or regular steel will not hurt the finish it will only remove the rust spots and leave only a clean bare finish free of corrosion.

    Just make sure you lube the gun down with oil after removing the rust, 0000 steel wool is the professional method to remove small rust spots and rust from any steel firearm with out even marring the original blued or satin finish.

    Also as long as the steel wool pad is new and not old and rusted, there is no possible way to transfer rust from the new pad to the gun.

    If anyone disagrees with this method, it is because they don't know what they are talking about.

    What ever you do, don't bead blast it, it will make it look worse.
     
  12. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    Bead blasting is "usually" the original "finish" for stainless steel unless it is polished. Bead blasting "with fresh" media will return it to it's original appearance.
     
  13. xr1200

    xr1200 Member

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    Bead blasting would be a last resort and the slide must be completely disassembled , even the sights removed to do it.

    Using the 0000 steel wool or metal polish and a rag is the least harmfull.

    You could actually try some frizt polish or mothers mag polish also works well.
     
  14. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    That would be my first choice.
     
  15. SGW42

    SGW42 Member

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    We have a winner!

    Bar Keepers Friend cleaned the spots right off! Sprinkled a bit on a wet towel, gently rubbed, wiped clean with another damp towel, dryed, and thouroughly lubed. Good as new! Was going to try the wheel polish first, but I was at the grocery store today and they had the Bar Keepers Friend.

    Ramone if you're in town I owe you a beer (which will be more than the $2 I spent on the BKF)!
     
  16. SGW42

    SGW42 Member

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    Oh, and I used it to clean my sink while I was testing it out. :D
     
  17. Ramone

    Ramone Member

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    HA! told ya so!

    Like I said, as I live on a boat (with all my guns) I have had a chance to really learn a lot about rust- even on my Stainless ones.

    Glad it worked out for you- BKF is one of my favorite 'tricks'- I use it on Teak, Fiberglass, metal, even for waterspots on glass.

    I even use it to clean my reloading brass. I love that stuff. And the Price is right!

    R.
     
  18. viking499

    viking499 Member

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    Flitz and a rag works also.
     
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