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tips on shooting glocks

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by csa77, Jan 21, 2014.

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  1. csa77

    csa77 Member

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    I recently broke down and bought the gun I said Id never own, a glock. Actually a gen3 g34.

    This is the first striker fired gun I have owned and it Im having alot of trouble hitting point of aim, all my shots go high and to the left. on top of that I have trouble rapidly getting the glock sights lined up(thinking about replacing them with Sevigny Comp sights). I can shoot normal hammer fired guns pretty good. Always point of aim. With my beloved Hi Power raising the gun toward the target, the sights are almost dead on even before I aim.

    Im going to be attending a GSSF shoot next month and dont want to make a fool out of my self LOL. I wish I could take my hi power, I do so well with that gun.
     
  2. txgunsuscg

    txgunsuscg Member

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    Rockwell Tactical has tips on Glock finger placement. Helped me with my drifting left.
     
  3. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    Well, there's nothing awesome about the Glock factory sights. Lots of good options out there, though. Dawsons, Sevigny, Warren tactical are very good.

    As far as pushing left, that's almost certainly you struggling to get used to the new trigger. Dryfire practice will help, and a bunch of repetitions of the "empty case drill" will, too. (Empty case balanced on slide, dryfire and break shot without dislodging case.)

    For most GSSF stuff, getting the sights "lined up" per se shouldn't be so important as simply finding the front sight and applying proper trigger control. The distances are mostly not so great you need a lot of rear sight work.
     
  4. MrBorland

    MrBorland Moderator Staff Member

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    I gave up on trying to figure out how to shoot a Glock to POA. I sold it and bought another striker-fired gun that didn't present an obstacle to overcome right up front. To bad, as it was otherwise a good gun.
     
  5. VA27

    VA27 Member

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    Glocks are funny. LOTS of shooters shoot left with a new Glock. Verticle stringing can be caused by an inconsistent grip. Gotta grip it with the same pressure every shot. When you can shoot good groups (no matter where they are on the target) then you can adjust the sights for POA/POI.
     
  6. Teachu2

    Teachu2 Member

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    It took me 3-400 rounds with my G34 to figure out it wasn't a 1911 and never would be - so I started playing with my grip until I found what works for me. Worked well enough that I won the first GSSF match I entered, with a 493/500.
     
  7. C0untZer0

    C0untZer0 Member

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    I spent a lot of time doing dry fire drills, and spent a lot of time practicing at the range with my stock Glock trigger.

    Then I put a trigger kit in it and everything got better :)
     
  8. GLOOB

    GLOOB Member

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    With the Glock, work on getting your head to sit lower at least as much as you work on the grip/sights. After you get used to that, you'll find the Hi Power points low unless you stretch your neck up like a prairie dog.

    FWIW, I also need to keep my trigger finger in practice to rapidly shoot a mid-frame Glock, accurately. But the G21/20 is spot on, all the time, every time. A grip enhancer of some sort might help you out.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2014
  9. Sebastian the Ibis
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    Sebastian the Ibis Member

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    Keep your grip as high as you can consistently. Then try using the end of your finger on the trigger - think 45 degrees from your fingernail not 90. Also try shooting w your left eye completely closed, if you are not doing so already.

    Dump the sights. The only reason I have factory sights on any of my glocks is that there have not been any discount aftermarket sights on the sale boards here in a while.
     
  10. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    ?

    This goes directly against modern dynamic handgunning teaching (which says shoot with both eyes open unless you simply cannot), so can you explain how it would help him?
     
  11. aarondhgraham

    aarondhgraham Member

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    Use C-Clamps,,,

    Use C-Clamps,,,
    Secure them to the target rack very tightly.

    Aarond

    Sorry, I couldn't resist. :eek:

    .
     
  12. wally

    wally Member

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    Was in the same boat until I got a gen4.

    I found the 3.5lb trigger connector helped a lot with my older ones, but I'd question this setup for anything other than range use.
     
  13. Hangingrock

    Hangingrock Member

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    Years more like decades in the past a PMI (Primary Marksmanship Instructor) told me the reason I was having problems because I was not following what had been taught proper instructed fundamentals'. Basic fundamentals apply to all handguns.

    I've had no long term problems when transitioning to Glock. Yes there was a learning curve no more so than transitioning from a 1911A1 to a S&W 4506. Surprisingly the M&P trigger was somewhat of a nettlesome issue after using Glock's over an extended period of time. Neither are problematic now and I employ both during a firing session. That's my story and it may differ from the experience of others.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2014
  14. G.barnes

    G.barnes Member

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    Upgrading the connector to one like a ghost rocket makes all the difference. I don't know anyone who likes factory glock sights. I put a set of ameriglo on mine for around 80$.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2014
  15. Inebriated

    Inebriated Member

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    1, the grip angle is different on the Glock than it is on your Hi Power. Try some Grip Force Adapters, they should change the grip angle to a more 1911ish angle. New sights that work for your eyes will help a lot in sight acquisition as well.

    2, get a lot of trigger time. Glocks really show flaws in trigger control. Get to the range when you can, dry fire when you can't. Dry firing will certainly show what is causing the shots to go high/left. Make sure that you're following through with the trigger, too. Hold it until it's finished recoiling, let it out til it resets, and begin another press. Using a lighter connector will only slightly mask trigger control errors.
     
  16. chris in va

    chris in va Member

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    You're used to the famous BHP natural grip angle, like my CZ. I bought a G21sf and couldn't adapt to the mushy trigger and weird grip angle. My point shooting accuracy went out the window, so I sold it.

    One of our top club shooters had the same issue and got the Timber Wolf frame for his longslide which is a normal angle.
     
  17. RetiredUSNChief

    RetiredUSNChief Member

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    I agree with Sam in post #3. You almost certainly have a problem with the differences in the new trigger.

    Sit yourself down at a bench and do some very slow, careful firing with your arms/gun supported by a rest of some sort. The purpose of this is to eliminate, as much as possible, any movement other than that caused by your trigger finger. It eliminates or minimizes movement caused by heartbeat, breathing, standing unsupported, etc.

    Concentrate exclusively on maintaining a proper sight picture the entire time you are slowly squeezing the trigger.

    If you are able to hit point of aim under these conditions, then you've eliminated the pistol as a source of mechanical problems. Now you need to concentrate on learning what's different between this pistol and others that you've fired.

    Very likely, it's the trigger pull.

    I had a similar problem when I bought my third pistol many years ago (Beretta 92FS). I couldn't shoot worth a darn with is, patterns all over the target, missing the target, etc. Puzzled the heck out of me because I had absolutely no problems with my Colt 1991A1 and my AMT Automag II.

    So I sit my keister down at a bench rest and did some slow fire just as I described above. I had no problems shooting point of aim then, so I figured the fault was with me. And it was.

    The problem I had was the trigger pull on the Beretta is mechanically different than that of my other two pistols. The Colt and AMT triggers are of a design wherein the entire trigger moves straight back when you pull the trigger. The Beretta trigger, however, isn't designed this way: it pivots during the trigger pull.

    And that pivot made all the difference in the world.

    Once I understood this, then it was a simple matter of training myself by plenty of target shooting where I concentrated on a proper trigger pull for the Beretta.
     
  18. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    My even better advice would be to learn to shoot DA revolvers fast and well as these problems won't ever trouble you again! :) It is actually pretty good advice, but usually requires several years longer than folks want to spend to develop the skill.
     
  19. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

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    With the rear sight centered in the dovetail all my Glocks shot left for me out of the box.

    I adjusted the rear sight, and they now all shoot to point of aim.
     
  20. Inebriated

    Inebriated Member

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    This! This so much!
     
  21. RetiredUSNChief

    RetiredUSNChief Member

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    Is it my imagination or does this sound like the "Buy a GLOCK and forget the rest" kinda statement?

    ;)
     
  22. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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    Its your imagination. :)

    That statement applies to "all" firearms. Once you learn to shoot "DA", you loose that trigger phobia that afflicts so many. ;)
     
  23. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    I never learned so much so fast about pistol shooting as I did the year I set out to shoot nothing but wheelguns in competition. One thing it did was ruin my ability/tendency to judge autopistol triggers to any fine degree. Folks say, "oh, that M&P has a terrible trigger. I can't shoot it well because it's so much worse than the perfect 1911 glass-rod break I'm used to!" And I tend to be thinking, "Uh...yeah, right, sure, whatever. :rolleyes:"

    Which isn't terribly sympathetic on my part. :eek:
     
  24. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    The best bit of advice I can give you is to NOT "stage" the glock trigger when trying for accuracy.
    Staging a glock it similar pistol trigger is a surefire recipie for crappy accuracy

    Smooth complete pulls that you don't think about and follow through on are critical.
     
  25. csa77

    csa77 Member

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    Im not too bad with revolvers in double action, I have used my 340pd, 686 snub, and a model 29 for bowling pin(all just for fun) and done pretty good shooting them in double action, but that's only 10 yards.

    Iv only shot the g34 2 times, 350 rounds each trip. 700 rounds though the g34 and still not used to it. With slow fire, standing, at 15 - 20 yards most of my shots are in the "A" ring of the NRA d1 target. all high and left. most are on the verge of exiting the A ring.

    I blacked out the stock Glock sights with a magic marker today, oddly it seems to help somewhat with quicker acquisition. I know a aftermarket trigger setup or connector will help alot, but I cant use that in GSSF, at least not in class In want to try.

    I think for me its the combination between the stacking in the stock trigger combined with the over travel and me not able to get a consistent grip on the gun.
     
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