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Titanium Rifles

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by exbiologist, Feb 22, 2010.

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  1. exbiologist

    exbiologist Member

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    What's the downside, other than cost? I know it weighs less than steel, does it rust or corrode in any way? Is it as hard as steel, will it scratch more or less than steel? Any special maintenance issues or issues when handloading titanium receivered guns. Any special issues when mounting scopes to titanium?
    Reason I'm asking is I'm kicking the tires on a .325 WSM Browning A-Bolt Ti. 5 1/2 pounds is pretty tough to beat.
     
  2. rogertc1

    rogertc1 member

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    Very Expensive to machine. Can't make an entire gun out of Ti.
     
  3. blackrussian

    blackrussian Member

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    Ti has excellent corrosion resistance. But there are issues with rifling a Ti barrel, IRC.
     
  4. jr_roosa

    jr_roosa Member

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    Titanium isn't all that great except in certain applications. It's main appeal is that it sounds cool. If you believe ads then you might think that titanium it's best friend carbon fiber can cut diamonds all day long and then slice a tomato afterwards.

    It is less strong than steel, but stronger than aluminum, so it fills a middle ground. It doesn't take a finish easily, but it forms a very thin layer of oxide on the outside that prevents further corrosion. It is also tricky to work with.

    It's great for items you would make from aluminum, but would like to get away with less material or make it stronger with about the same weight. It's also good for items that you would normally make from steel, but you would like to make lighter and in exchange are willing to give up strength. It makes a nice bicycle frame, for example.

    Titanium is also flammable. You can build a bonfire with it if you use magnesium for kindling. I don't think that it gets hot enough in a barrel to ignite.

    If you had a titanium barrel, I bet it would wear out in no time.

    -J.
     
  5. exbiologist

    exbiologist Member

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    Ok, but the two mainstream titanium rifles (Remington and Browning) have stainless barrels right?
     
  6. Uncle Mike

    Uncle Mike Member

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    Right...the only thing Ti on these guns are the receivers. You cannot use Ti for a barrel, even with a liner, Titanium does not do well for barrels.

    No special precautions have to be adhered to with the Ti receivers.
     
  7. rha600

    rha600 Member

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    in a bike, I'll take Ti any day.

    In a rifle (or pistol) eh, I'd rather have SS.
     
  8. Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow

    Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow member

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    I *really* want a Rem 700 Alaskan Ti in .280 Rem. Receiver only, as UM said. Only downside I think you'll find, other than cost, is that it will only last 4 lifetimes, instead of 5 like a steel receiver gun. :)
     
  9. waterhouse

    waterhouse Member

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    Had one in 260. Great gun, no issues with the Ti receiver. It turns out I prefer the balance/feel of the regular mountain gun (steel) so I sold the Ti, but it was a great gun other than the cost.
     
  10. exbiologist

    exbiologist Member

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    I hadn't really considered them until I found a NIB Abolt Ti for $1,100, which has really got me thinking hard about this.
     
  11. Tang419

    Tang419 Member

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    The Rem Ti rifles are really nice.
     
  12. Uncle Mike

    Uncle Mike Member

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    Something else to ponder....the .325WSM has one foot in the grave as we speak, in the near distant future you'll be reloading for the rifle...if this is of any concern.
     
  13. SpeedAKL

    SpeedAKL Member

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    Ti is light and has excellent heat resistance, which is why you see it frequently in aircraft components and high-performance automobile engines. Not cheap though!
     
  14. Tang419

    Tang419 Member

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    People have been calling the .325 dead since it came out, but just like the .45 GAP, its still hanging on and gaining ground slowly. It has been 5 years since it was released, and there are still rifles being chambered for it, and ammo being produced. So I have to respectfully disagree with you on this.

    You still have Browning, Winchester, Kimber, and even Nosler Custom rifles being chambered for it. I'm not a huge fan of the shorties, but I did own a .325 until last year, when I decided I didn't need it along with my .338 Win Mag. It's a great chambering. As far as ammo, Winchester, Double Tap and Nosler are loading for it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2010
  15. Uncle Mike

    Uncle Mike Member

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    Disagree away...but Winchester cut 325 production by 30%, and that was 'last' year, if the numbers do not respond this year, they will cut it again.

    There will be ammo loaded in this guise for sometime, but unless this round takes off, and seeing how it has no real advantage over already established cartridges, I doubt it ever will, I think it will enjoy an early retirement.
     
  16. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    My 700 Ti in 7mm08 was 3/4 MOA, right out of the box. That's with both Core Lokts and handloads. With a Leupold 3x9, ammo and sling, it's 6.25 pounds. Much appreciated by my ancient legs. :) The stock fits me well enough that the recoil at the bench is not at all onerous--and the butt pad is good.

    Color me "really happy". :D
     
  17. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    While I agree that the Alaskan Ti rifles are very accurate and beautifully made, are you sure that you're correct about the weight? I'm having a hard time believing that the rifle, scope, rings/base, sling and ammo tip the scales at only 6.25lb. I'd be more inclined to believe 7.25lb based on the weight of my Alaskan Ti in .300 WSM with a Zeiss 3-9x40mm scope and Talley Lightweight one-piece rings/bases. Not trying to cause an argument, just curious that's all. I didn't care for the stock on the Alaskan so I switched it for a much nicer Bell and Carlson model.

    Since you mention 7mm-08, my "new" Savage Weather Warrior 16 FCSS in 7mm-08 with a 1:11.5 barrel isn't doing well at all with 139gr SST bullets from Hornady. I'm hoping the next range session is a lot better than the first two.

    :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2010
  18. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    By the way, I get the impression from Remington's web site that the Alaskan Ti models have been discontinued. Any thoughts or first-hand knowledge about this?

    :)
     
  19. waterhouse

    waterhouse Member

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    Art may not have an Alaskan Ti. The first ones were just called 700 Ti, and they weighed less than the later Alaskan models. My 260 was one of the originals and on a fairly accurate scale came in at 6.3 scoped and slung.
     
  20. Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow

    Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow member

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    Which one, waterhouse - Rem?

    Oh, now I see you answered that - wow, cannot believe you didn't keep that one, WH!

    1858, how hard or easy was it to sell your stock?
     
  21. Uncle Mike

    Uncle Mike Member

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    While the fat lady is just clearing her throat right now on this issue...she'll be singing shortly!

    The 700Ti has not been a stellar seller for Big Green, so I would imagine it is in the sights of the bean counters....they are being 'slightly' discounted at most wholesalers right now, and have been for a while now! Problem is, they are still way up there as to price!
     
  22. P.B.Walsh

    P.B.Walsh Member

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    Would Ti be any good for a rifle stock? Better then aluminum, but with better resisance and same weight.....
     
  23. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    But it's not listed on Remington's website under 700 models, hence my suggestion that Remington is quietly dropping that model. I'm very happy with my Alaskan in .300 WSM and have no plans on getting rid of it. It shoots very, very well.

    I didn't sell it ... it's still in the closet.

    :)
     
  24. Uncle Mike

    Uncle Mike Member

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    Yup!.....sssshhhhhhhh, me tinks big green want to keep it a secret!
     
  25. TehK1w1

    TehK1w1 Member

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    P.B. Walsh, finished Ti products are NOT cheap. you could make a stock out of it, but between the cost of materials and difficulty of machining it would probably be quite expensive.
     
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