To Co-Ax or Not to Co-Ax?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by wankerjake, Feb 9, 2019.

?

Keep or Sell?

Poll closed Feb 11, 2019.
  1. Keep it! They are awesome

    15 vote(s)
    48.4%
  2. Sell it, you don't need it and can put $200 towards something you do

    4 vote(s)
    12.9%
  3. Try it for awhile, they hold their value

    12 vote(s)
    38.7%
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. wankerjake

    wankerjake Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2008
    Messages:
    2,460
    Location:
    Flagstaff AZ
    I like to spend my free time looking for large lots of reloading or shooting equipment that someone is getting rid of and buying it all. I keep what I want or need, and sell the rest, and this is a lot of work but also works out for me. However there's always something I'm on the fence about.

    This time it is a Bonanza (Forster) Co-Ax press. The press is in good shape, it is equipped with the large priming arm/shellholder jaws which is what I'd use most.

    I am happy with the quality/accuracy of my rifle cartridges on my RCBS partner. My current setup works just fine for me. However...

    1. I would like a larger single stage press. I do this often so I will have more chances at a larger single stage at some point. I almost kept the Hornady Lock'n'Load press with the last deal but I didn't.
    2. I know the Co-Ax is regarded at one of the best for uniformity etc. However as I stated I am already getting fine accuracy out to 500 yards with what I am doing. It's annoying that I'd have to buy and change parts if I wanted to load 223, or I'd have to keep the partner press. This is more of a want than a need at this time however at some point I could see myself getting a 30 Nosler or 375 H&H and at that point I'd need a larger press.
    3. You can't have too many presses though. I want a second turret press too actually. I have room.
    4. The Co-Ax is just cool. I suppose this is petty but I think it will add a unique factor to the bench.
    5. The Co-Ax is worth more resale than the next Rock Chucker or whatever large single stage I come across next
    6. One way to look at it is I'd be losing $150-$200 by keeping it. The other way to look at it is I'd be getting an exceptional press for free.
    7. Polls are fun and we haven't had one in awhile
    8. 48 hour poll because I'm listing the rest of this stuff soon.


    I am leaning towards keeping it and at least trying it but am curious about what Co-Ax owners think (and others) and also polls are fun and I haven't started a thread in awhile. So... shoot. What would you do?
     
  2. Hokie_PhD

    Hokie_PhD Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2017
    Messages:
    2,732
    Location:
    Central Virginia
    Whats the rush?
    Try it and see if you like it. If you do and you use it, keep it. If not sell it or keep it if you d9nt need the money then sell it if you do.

    Personally I’m a tool collector, but I also like not having extra stuff. So I’m working on balance. So my suggestion is based on that view.

    Personally, I’d keep it but I’d also think about selling it if the profit was nice enough.
     
    wankerjake likes this.
  3. 243winxb

    243winxb Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    12,982
    Location:
    Hopewell Big Woods
    I see posts that new is currently sold our every where? List is $340. Short supply, sell now.

    Put the money in a used Dillon RL-450

    I did notice the coax lever travel is about 180 degrees. Rcbs, about 50 degress.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
    wankerjake likes this.
  4. frankmako

    frankmako Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2012
    Messages:
    703
    Location:
    Southeast Tennessee
    Try it you might find a need for it. If not sale it.
     
    wankerjake likes this.
  5. Legionnaire
    • Contributing Member

    Legionnaire Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    7,975
    Location:
    Texas
    I looked high and low before finding a Co-ax and really like it for rifle cartridges. I still use my Lee Classic Turret for my revolver cartridges. Were I you, I'd hang on to it and try it out. You won't have any trouble selling it later if you find it's not for you.

    My presses are mounted on InLine Fabrication quick change plates and I swap in whichever one I need.
     
    wankerjake likes this.
  6. Orcon

    Orcon Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2015
    Messages:
    988
    Location:
    Sidney, MT
    Why would you need to buy parts? Does yours not have the double-sided S jaws for the shell holder?

    I bought one specifically for the priming feature but I'm not smart enough to use it without wrecking brass. Still, it's an amazing press and I'm glad I got one early in my life as a hand loader. Round lockrings are a must have though.
     
    JimKirk and wankerjake like this.
  7. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2014
    Messages:
    1,516
    Location:
    ohio
    To be honest there are 2 ( current production) single stage presses I would consider if I had my hands on them I would keep. The Forster Coaxial press and the MEC Marksman.
     
    wankerjake likes this.
  8. DM~

    DM~ Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    Messages:
    3,310
    Location:
    upper mid west
    The travel is adjustable, you can shorten it for shorter cartridges!

    DM
     
    wankerjake and JimKirk like this.
  9. wankerjake

    wankerjake Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2008
    Messages:
    2,460
    Location:
    Flagstaff AZ
    It may have the double sided S-jaws

    The priming setup looks like its for large primers though

    It came with like 20 Forster lock rings
     
  10. lightman

    lightman Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    3,131
    Location:
    Sherwood AR
    Most reloaders love them. Its a nice press. Personally, many of the features don't tempt me. The universal shell holder and the ability to change dies quickly, to name a couple. But my biggest dislike is the ergonomics. I prefer the press handle to be lower and beside the press, not above it.

    But, since you have it, and probably at a bargain price, I would give it a chance. Whats to loose?
     
  11. VAReloader

    VAReloader Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2017
    Messages:
    71
    I have one and will keep until ……. well whatever. They are great.
    Keep it and try it or as others have said, they get scarce from time to time and you can certainly get a nice price for it.

    Did I already say they are great?
     
    wankerjake likes this.
  12. daboone

    daboone Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Messages:
    179
    Location:
    Phoenix, Kealakekua
    How so? The handle has to go to the top to open the jaws. Then the handle has to go thru full downward travel for the case to enter the die. If there is a shorter travel method please educate me.
     
    243winxb likes this.
  13. jmorris

    jmorris Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Messages:
    19,478
    I like my co-ax. That said the dies and components you use are more important than what press you use. It’s a nice press but it’s not magical.
     
    Mowgli Terry likes this.
  14. jmorris

    jmorris Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Messages:
    19,478
    You can put a stubby handle on it, if you don’t need the leverage, so your arm makes less motion while the press does goes through full travel. You can also adjust the handle on the Dillon 1050.
     
    daboone likes this.
  15. SummitTech

    SummitTech Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Messages:
    9
    I started with the hornady lock and load classic. I noticed a huge improvement when I went to the co-ax. Ive always used redding dies and the runout caused by the lock and load was terrible. Same die same batch of brass and no runout from the co-ax. That was a win for me I got use to ergonomics of the press after using it.

    The largest caliber I resize currently is 30-06. It takes no effort to full size the brass. I'm confident magnum calibers will not be a problem with the co-ax.
     
  16. dh1633pm
    • Contributing Member

    dh1633pm Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Messages:
    3,852
    Location:
    Central New York
    There is a reason they hold their value. Try it, if you like it keep it. You can always sell it later.
     
    wankerjake likes this.
  17. DM~

    DM~ Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    Messages:
    3,310
    Location:
    upper mid west
    Ready to be educated?? lol

    The "pointed" bolt/screw that opens the jaws, can be turned (screwed) with your fingers to "raise" it, making the jaws open sooner, and that in fact, shortens the stroke.

    DM
     
    daboone and JimKirk like this.
  18. wankerjake

    wankerjake Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2008
    Messages:
    2,460
    Location:
    Flagstaff AZ
    It's good to see everyone is pretty happy with this press. I'm gonna give it a shot, if I don't love it I can sell it down the line. Thanks all.
     
  19. Bwana John

    Bwana John Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2004
    Messages:
    2,602
    Dude...

    No matter what you chose, you need to step up from that Partner press!

    They are fine for starting out or a portable press mounted to a board and C-clamp for camp or range, but doing any operations that require moving brass around like necking up/down or small base resizing is much easier with the bigger press, I broke a partner press frame with very little effort (RCBS did replace it free).

    I would loan you a Rock Chucker if you want to see how the leverage, strength, larger working area, rigidness compairs to the Co-Ax and we could figure out something if you want to keep it... or you could just give it back after comparison.

    We are close, I am inside 11M but outside of town.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
    wankerjake likes this.
  20. Mowgli Terry

    Mowgli Terry Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2016
    Messages:
    1,322
    Location:
    Tennesse-former Confederacy
    There is more net BS about the Co-Ax than most any other piece of loading gear. I have had mine since Reagan was president. It is Bonanza. The term
    "precision" is a non-statement. I don't think you can load ammo any better than the dies you use or the quality of the brass. Quality of brass mean concentric necks and correctly sized (not a non-statement-there's several ways to get there). My Co-Ax is currently used as a hat rack. Somebody tell me specifically about precision ammo. I do not want the hear about floating dies and jaw like shell holders. To get pointy headed no "positive inferential non-statements".
     
  21. JimKirk

    JimKirk Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Messages:
    3,483
    Location:
    Nicholls,GA South Georgia
    Not only will that shorten the stroke ....you can also replace the bolt with a longer one and make the stroke short( you will have to fashion the taper with a grinder or use a drill press and file)....

    That will work with pistol/revolver/very short rifle cartridges....
     
    daboone likes this.
  22. Mowgli Terry

    Mowgli Terry Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2016
    Messages:
    1,322
    Location:
    Tennesse-former Confederacy
    Pointed pin: On my older Co-Ax you would be putting some more strain of the shell holder jaws. On my old press unscrewing the pointed in will open the jaw but there is no stop. On the older press it would just open the jaws to the diameter of the pin. One guru on another forum claimed the Co-Ax was stronger than a RC. The Co-Ax is a C press on steroids. OK, show my how you use file trim dies and that sort on a Co-Ax?
     
    daboone likes this.
  23. dh1633pm
    • Contributing Member

    dh1633pm Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Messages:
    3,852
    Location:
    Central New York
    Sorry to hear that you don't reload any longer. Its like that exercise machine the wife always wanted. Makes a nice clothes rack (in your case a hat rack). Many would gladly take it off your hands for a good price.
     
    JimKirk likes this.
  24. Mowgli Terry

    Mowgli Terry Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2016
    Messages:
    1,322
    Location:
    Tennesse-former Confederacy
    Your crystal ball is goofed up. I got on Dilon 550, a RC and a heavy duty Lyman press set up. I load four or five different head sizes. You guy need to share how easy it is to change shell holders. My current project is for 9.3x57 brass on my RC, one of two in the loading room. There are also two Lyman in the mix. The Co-Ax sits alone on a stand with the RCII. Also working up loads for 300WSM and 300 Win Mag. The 338 Federal is on the back burner. Also, on the back burner is 45-90 and 45-110 but the 40-65 is on the front burner as is the 256 Newton. I don't give lesson anymore. There's plenty of reloading going on here. How about you?
     
    dh1633pm likes this.
  25. daboone

    daboone Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Messages:
    179
    Location:
    Phoenix, Kealakekua
    Unless you make one like JimKirk the difference in stroke is a fraction of an inch on my Bonanza. As far as being superior to other presses for concentricity I've found the dies used are far more important for concentricity issues, no matter what press is used. What make the CO-AX shine is the simplicity of die swaps, case insertion and specific shellholders for a large range of calibers. I love InLine's short roller handle, worth every penny.
     
    JimKirk likes this.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice