Tokarev Safety Tips

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Chernobyl Enthusiast, Dec 15, 2016.

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  1. Chernobyl Enthusiast

    Chernobyl Enthusiast member

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    The Tokarev is an amazing pistol, you just have to know how to treat it. It was made for a purpose different from today's needs; if you treat it like a modern pistol, you could get hurt.

    Here is an excellent guide for how to properly use a Tokarev:

    http://www.kegisland.com/tokarev-tt-33-tips.html

    A brief overview:

    1. Do not trust the aftermarket safety.
    2. It was made for a full flap holster.
    3. Positive firing pin; DO NOT UNCOCK THE HAMMER WITH A ROUND IN THE CHAMBER
    4. You could carry it chambered and half cocked, but it is safer to carry it on empty chamber. If you do carry it chamber loaded; PLEASE DON'T DROP IT!
    5. Replacing all the springs doesn't just make it work better, it makes it safer.
    6. Use non marring tools when working on it; communist blueing.
    7. When disassembling, don't let the recoil spring fly out (and hit you in the eye).
    8. For more accuracy, don't white-knuckle grip it.
    9. Be very careful where you shoot it; the bullets are EXTREMELY penetrative. (They can zip through level IIIA body armor; which a .44 Mag cannot penetrate!)
    Read the article yourself; it is very informative, and has disassembly tips.

    I hope this has been informative, and have a nice/safe day!
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2016
    Eugen and Fiv3r like this.
  2. RX-79G

    RX-79G Member

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    It is a stretch to say that every version of the aftermarket safeties used on these guns are all worthless. If it reliably blocks the trigger or sear or firing pin, than it isn't much different than any other modern manual safety.
     
  3. Chernobyl Enthusiast

    Chernobyl Enthusiast member

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    I think the writer of the article was thinking about the aftermarket safeties on the TTCs. It only stops the trigger; not the firing components, making it very vulnerable to accidental discharge (mostly from dropping). But let me modify the wording on my overview. Now it will say do not trust, instead of it is worthless.

    But most (most, not all) things in the article do not apply to the modern Zastava Tokarevs.
     
  4. RX-79G

    RX-79G Member

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    Yup, they work just like the safety on Sig P210 or a Ruger MkII.

    "Drop safety" comes from what can happen when a gun hits the ground hard enough to jar pieces or break others. With the hammer cocked and the mass of the trigger restrained by a safety, the main thing you have to worry about is an impact that could shake the sear loose from the hammer, and if that happens the half cock is there to catch it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2016
  5. Chernobyl Enthusiast

    Chernobyl Enthusiast member

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    The trigger safety is fine, it's just the fact that the firing mech is not made to handle dropping/prevent accidental discharge, unlike the Sig. Dripping is bad, no matter what; but the Tokarev is more vulnerable to damage from a drop.
     
  6. RX-79G

    RX-79G Member

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    It sure isn't a Sig. But I would bet it is easier to get a series 70 1911 to fire from a drop than a cocked and locked Tokarev.
     
  7. Chernobyl Enthusiast

    Chernobyl Enthusiast member

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    Interesting idea! That is something someone needs to test: what does it take to get a (selection of pistols, including the Tok and 1911) to accidentally discharge?
    That'd be great.
     
  8. Starter52

    Starter52 Member

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    Here's another tip -
    The Tokarev is a lot more comfortable to shoot if you slide one of those sleeve-like rubber adapters over the grip frame. Uncle Mike makes them in different sizes. Well worth the few bucks they cost.
     
  9. RX-79G

    RX-79G Member

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    I'm basing this on the tendency of inertial firing pin 1911s to drop fire muzzle down. A Tokarev's full length firing pin is much less likely to do that.
     
  10. Chernobyl Enthusiast

    Chernobyl Enthusiast member

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    Ah... OK. Im basing my ideas on a fall that hits the hammer spur. That makes sense. And I completely agree with you on that.
     
  11. RX-79G

    RX-79G Member

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    Hitting the hammer spur when the hammer is cocked doesn't generally damage the hammer hooks or sear. Half cock does because of where the hammer is positioned to receive and transmit impact.
     
  12. Dain Bramage

    Dain Bramage Member

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    Another tip: if you carry with an empty chamber, hammer cocked makes working the slide easier.
     
  13. Panzerschwein

    Panzerschwein member

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    Care to elaborate on this?
     
  14. Fiv3r

    Fiv3r Member

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    The few times I carried mine as a woods pistol, this is exactly I kept it. Those Toks are tough to work with the hammer down, for sure.
     
  15. mavracer

    mavracer Member

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    I'm not in the habit of dropping or throwing guns so I'll carry mine chambered at half cock like it was designed to be.
     
  16. Eugen

    Eugen Member

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    I have a 1938 Russian TT33 and a Tokagypt T58 Firebird variant. I love the tank-like build quality of these classic guns and enjoy taking them to the range. However, I would not consider them a good choice for EDC due to their design that is short on safety features. As much as I love the guns, there are simply too many other better choices out there for a CCW. Then again, everyone has the own personal selection criteria.

    OP, The article on Tokarev safety was a nice read. Thanks for sharing.
     
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