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Too much recoil

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by blindhari, May 8, 2016.

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  1. blindhari

    blindhari Member

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    Last week, at the range I touched off a standard 357 mag in an SP 101 Ruger and almost dropped the gun. Tried again yesterday and same results. I can still shoot a J frame 38 special but not a hot load. I have an appointment with an orthopedist but I am covering all bases and thinking about A 32 H&R mag, a low recoil 38 Special, or a 22lr pt22 Taurus that I can point shoot well. Has any one here had experience with Liberty Munitions Civil Defense loads ? If my wrist continues to deteriorate I may have to go to the 22lr.

    any advice appreciated,

    blindhari
     
  2. yugorpk

    yugorpk member

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    I'm up for any excuse to buy a new gun but maybe just run light 38 special loads in the SP101?
     
  3. blindhari

    blindhari Member

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    The SP 101 is an infrequently used mate to a Win 94 trapper in 357. Normally I use a light 38 J frame. I guess I could give up 357 mag totally but the Trapper is my varmint rifle.

    blindhari
     
  4. JohnFLand

    JohnFLand Member

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    Trade in the SP for a GP100 -- more mass and a bigger grip.
     
  5. AlfonsDeWolf

    AlfonsDeWolf Member

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    Uh, maybe just look at different grips before you sell and buy something else.
     
  6. AlfonsDeWolf

    AlfonsDeWolf Member

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  7. Steve C

    Steve C Member

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    Lot of the pain and discomfort from recoil comes from grips that don't fit your hand and allow the gun to move in your hand under recoil rather than just bringing your arm up. A set of good grips will go a long way to taming recoil. I like the Pachmayer grips and the Compac's are on all my small revolvers.

    I've shot a friends SP101 with magnums and found it manageable with the factory grips for me but if I owned a SP101 these would be what I'd put on it.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. DP03

    DP03 Member

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    I agree with the grip comments above. I have a Ruger Alaskan Super Redhawk, one of the strongest revolvers in the world, and its a snubby .44 mag. My daughter, 110 lbs, can shoot it with ease. Thanks to the Hogue Tamer grips. Amazing grips. Lots of revolver folks like their wood grips for looks, and I agree on the looks. But these rubber grips are the best out there. My wife is my backup in a SHTF scenario, and this is the gun she chooses (with .44 Special rounds).
     
  9. AZAndy
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    AZAndy Contributing Member

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    As yugorpk suggested, there's nothing wrong with shooting .38's out of your Ruger. That's all mine has ever seen. My hands are getting creaky enough that I recently got rid of my Airweights 'cause I just couldn't handle that anymore. .38's in steel-framed revolvers are still okay for me. If you're thinking about self-defense situations, some 135-grain Gold Dots or 158-grain LSWCHP would do you just fine, and I don't think they'd give you much discomfort out of an SP101.

    Edit to add: I overlooked your mention of pairing with the rifle. While I frequently shoot .38's out of my Rossi 92, I don't know how good of a round that would be for the varmints you refer to-- 158 grains going at maybe 1000 fps? Depends on the varmint, I guess.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2016
  10. RunninLate

    RunninLate Member

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    As others have said, try different grips. I could not shoot my Ruger SBH 44 with the square trigger guard and got a set of Altamount grips. Make a huge difference. I took off the stock wooden grips and a set of rubber grips.
     
  11. LUCKYDAWG13

    LUCKYDAWG13 Member

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    Why not just shoot 38 special out of you 357 magnum SP101 and keep it
     
  12. Tallball

    Tallball Member

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    I have an SP101 in 327 magnum. It will also shoot several other milder 32 rounds. My wife (ruined wrists) and daughter (eleven years old) shoot it easily with 32 H&R magnum, which is a respectable round. They shoot 32 S&W long for target practice, which feels about like a 22, though throwing a much larger chunk of lead.

    My friend also has an SP101, in 357. My problem with both his and mine is that the factory grips are imho horrible. Most people very much prefer the Hogue monogrip. I thought it was an improvement. But with my huge hands I went one better and got large exotic wood grips for it. My friend has tiny hands and finds the factory grips to be perfectly acceptable.

    My friend is 5'6" with tiny but strong hands. His son is 5'8" with larger but weaker hands. I am 6'6" with large hands even for my size. My buddy's SP101 is a 3" with fixed sights.

    For all of us, shooting 38 special target loads was no big deal. The recoil wasn't much. The son is recoil-shy by nature, but did not object to it. Even with my enormous hands and the tiny horrible factory grips I had no problems. My tiny-handed friend could have shot it for hours. At 7 yards all of us shot it with quite acceptable combat accuracy.

    The 357's were a different story. The son shot one cylinder and that was more than enough for him. I think he would have preferred to set it down after one round! His dad joshed with him a bit and tried to get him to shoot one more cylinder full. The son was having none of it. He stuck to shooting 32's out of my 327 SP101 while his dad and I finished up the box of 357's. My friend didn't have too much trouble with them. The grips are the perfect size for his small but strong hands. He does not love recoil, grimaced a few times, and was not as accurate as with the 38's, but he did fine. I did okay. I couldn't get a really good grip on it, but I am used to heavier calibers and did not find the recoil to be painful or alarming. I was more accurate with the 38's, though.

    So, after the long rambling story... I got my Hogue monogrips for $10 and most people find them to be an enormous improvement. 38 special is an effective round and far easier to shoot out of an SP101 (imho). The 327 version will shoot at least four different kinds of ammo. Shooting 32 H&R magnum out if it is a great choice if you want a round on par with 38 special in effectiveness, but with significantly less recoil. The 327 magnum round is supposed to be close to the 357 in effectiveness - I found it noticeably spicier than the 32 H&R, but nowhere near 357 recoil.

    That was just my two cents. Here is a gratuitous picture of my 4" 327 with the exotic wood grips.

    7139ec28-578a-4655-be3a-f30a26c85d74_zpsotqeajqm.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2016
  13. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Howdy

    Not to be too much of a know it all, but the 357 Magnum cartridge was first developed for the big N frame Smith and Wesson Registered Magnum that later became the Model 27.

    As metallurgy has gotten better, manufacturers have been chambering the 357 Mag in smaller and lighter revolvers. But as the mass of the revolver decreases, felt recoil is going to increase. That is an unbreakable law of physics. You can alleviate it somewhat with custom grips, but that will only go so far.
     
  14. Waveski

    Waveski Member

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    I'm with Tallball. Hogue one piece wooden grips , finger grooved , combined with .38 special ammo makes my SP101 a very mild and manageable revolver.

    If that does not do the trick , and if your desire is to achieve pleasant target shooting , get yourself a quality da .22 revolver , such as a Smith & Wesson 617. Or - skip all the manageable .38 recommendations and go to the .22 right away - it will work for sure!
     
  15. M-Cameron

    M-Cameron member

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    sounds like you just need more practice....

    .357 is not a terribly hard recoiling round....

    i shoot 180 gr .357 out of my SP101 fairly regularly....its not terribly pleasant.....but hardly an unmanageable wrist breaker....and certainly nothing that would cause me to drop the gun....
     
  16. j1

    j1 Member

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    The gun can shoot a bunch of less powerful cartridges and check out aftermarket grips. It can do most of the things which need doing. I have Pachmyer grips on my model 60. Only five shots but very small.
     
  17. eldon519

    eldon519 Member

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    If it just stings, a new grip and practice will get you used to it. If you actually have an orthopedic problem though, I would not push it. .38 Special from a heavy compact like an SP101 is pretty mild. I've tried the stock grip, Hogue, Pachmayr, and Badger grips, and the Pachmayr Compac was the answer for me.
     
  18. GBExpat

    GBExpat Member

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    If you have an orthopaedic problem, blindhari, you should start-off your initial post with that very pertinent piece of info.

    As others have suggested, changing grips and/or ammunition would be the first thing that I would try.

    Good Luck!
     
  19. j1

    j1 Member

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    Heck you can buy or build ammo all the way down to 38 wadcutter. I doubt that the recoil of wadcutter would bother you.
     
  20. Paul7

    Paul7 Member

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    How about a 9mm with a rotating barrel, that really reduces recoil. The Grand Power K100 is really nice.
     
  21. Reloadron
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    Reloadron Contributing Member

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    That would be a good start, seeing what an ortho guy has to say. If for example you have nerve damage or the start of nerve damage you may be looking at the end of handgun shooting or in that hand anyway. While a 357 full house load may sting when fired in a light gun it should not hurt to where you want to put the gun down.

    The recoil for any given cartridge will be distributed to the gun and the shooter. The weight of the gun, the grips and other features control what the shooter feel as felt recoil. The difference between a Ruger SP101 and GP100 with about a 4" barrel is substantial. About 29.5 ounces on the SP101 as compared to 40 ounces on the GP100. Pushing a 158 grain LRN everyday bullet over 5.2 grains of powder to about 900 FPS the free recoil energy on the SP101is about 4.78 LbFt while the heavier GP100 is about 3.52 LbFt. What the shooter feels is a matter of the gun ergonomics like the grips.

    Here nor there, you need to find out what is causing the problem before worrying about what to buy or shoot.

    Just My Take....
    Ron
     
  22. murf

    murf Member

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    ask the ortho if you can use your left hand. my brother had a temporary problem with his right wrist; oddly enough, it was with a ruger sp101 and some hot 125 grain loads. that gave him the opportunity to get good with his left hand.

    luck,

    murf
     
  23. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    If you don't want to switch to .38 in the SP because you want ammo interchangeability with the rifle (and you specifically want .357 in that), then I don't see the point in switching the revolver to another caliber, such as .32 if .38 Special is easy for you to handle.
     
  24. pittpa

    pittpa Member

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    Find a box of Speer 357 135gr short barrel. It's out there if you look. It makes about 1000 FPS out of a snub and the 135 gr bullet is designed to expand reliably at that velocity. It barely qualifies for magnum designation. I find it tolerable in my 11 oz j frame. Makes about 300# muzzle energy if I recall. You may find it tolerable n your gun. Too expensive for practice.
     
  25. 98Redline

    98Redline Member

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    I find my .357 SP-101 to be a snappy little bugger, regardless of which grips I put on it. I am not what you would call recoil sensitive but the snappyness of that little .357 is somewhat unpleasant for lots of rounds.

    My suggestion is to go for a larger framed gun (GP-100, S&W 586/686) in a 4" barrel or similar. Even a Ruger Blackhawk would be a good choice. All of these should allow you to run your full power 357 loads without beating up your wrist too badly.

    This should allow you to select keep the ammunition consistency with your 94.
     
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