Tooling Marks?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by winfreeokra, Apr 16, 2021.

  1. winfreeokra

    winfreeokra Member

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    Just curious as I don’t foresee this as an issue but haven’t seen it on other once fired brass that I “made” last summer and am now reloading. This was A/E Federal 38 spc 130 gr fmj.

    Do they have something unique going on in there manufacturing process. The PMC I’m prepping has no such markings.

    BBB46070-F9A6-406A-B20C-788DCF01E7B6.jpeg
     
  2. CoalCrackerAl

    CoalCrackerAl Member

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    Nothing new there. Load'em.
     
  3. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    Are you referring to the cannelure ?
     
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  4. film495

    film495 Member

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    I've seen some brass with that ring toward the bottom on cases as well, not sure what it is there for, but - some has that some doesn't.
     
  5. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    ballman6711 likes this.
  6. winfreeokra

    winfreeokra Member

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    Well how about that. Cannelure in the brass to help prevent setback.

    Thanks for the solve 9m
     
  7. Riomouse911

    Riomouse911 Member

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    Some cases have no cannelure, some have one that may be high or in the middle, while others may even have two. Some are more pronounced than others, but the cannelure serves the same purpose no matter where they’re located on the case.

    ED0DAEFD-9475-41CC-8C30-09902FCBEF8D.jpeg

    The one in the middle has been nearly ironed out from reloading it a few times.

    As was stated, these help keep bullets from moving in cartridge cases as they sit in cylinders while others nearby are fired. :thumbup:

    Stay safe.
     
    Walkalong likes this.
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