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Touching up my oops...

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by BigBL87, Dec 21, 2018.

  1. BigBL87

    BigBL87 Member

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    Yesterday I received my Savage 10 FCP. I really like it, except...

    I went to remove, loctite, and replace the weaver bases, as I never trust the factory installation. Well, one screw on each base stripped the head, leaving me unable to get them out. I resigned myself to having to cut them off and buy new bases. Annoying, but it is what it is, and not my first issue like this with Savage. My Mark II, the threads were stripped when I removed the bases, ended up sending it back to Savage who to their credit fixed it. I love their rifles, but their bases and screws in particular seem to suck.

    Anyway, I used a dremel and cut into the base and screw, essentially turning the screw into a flathead. Was able to get both out and ordered Warne 2 piece bases as I like the more minimalist look over the one pieces available and I already have high rings. Their screws also look like much better quality.

    So, my oops...

    When I was doing the back base, the dremel slipped off the base and skipped off the side of the reciever. Pic below, along with one of the number I did on the bases. The mark isn't even enough that I can feel it, but it's obviously an eyesore. I ordered one of the Birchwood Casey flat black touch up markers.

    Will this be adequate or is there something more in depth I should do? I thought about cold bluing, but it seems like that might stand out more since it will end up glossy?

    20181221_133019.jpg 20181221_112304.jpg
     
  2. chicharrones

    chicharrones needs more ammo

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    As long as you like the result, the markers ought to work fine. Especially for a gun that will get a few knocks and dings in the future (aka: not a safe queen).

    I've used Sharpie markers and flat black paint, as well as cold blue for my guns. Those methods have worked well enough for my needs.
     
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  3. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    a friend of mine got a savage rifle. cant remember the model. it had a egw ic rail on it, all screws were cross threaded and the base was damaged. he called egw and did not even have to explain the problem, egw said this is common with savage.he got a new base 2 or 3 days later no charge. he sent in the rifle and they did not fix the screw holes, looks like they just chased the with a tap. i would get new bases they would bother me.
     
  4. LocoGringo

    LocoGringo Member

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    All of the above methods and include black fingernail polish. It's quite durable as well.
     
  5. MistWolf

    MistWolf Member

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    Next time, just drill off the heads of the screws, remove the bases and take the screws out with a pair of Vise Grips.
     
  6. Tilos

    Tilos Member

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    From the looks of the screw holes, there was some type of locking compound already on them.
    Touch a soldering iron to the screws to soften the Loctite for easier removal...next time.
    works for me,
    :D
    edit: File the end of the hex key until the corners are sharp to ensure total engagement of the shallow hex in the screw.
     
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  7. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

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    Good tip there!
    A correctly sized bit, and steady hand, should take the head off, and not leave a nick on the edges of the hole.
     
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  8. Bfh_auto

    Bfh_auto Member

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    If you do much wrenching on small screws and bolts, I recommend a set of reverse drill bits. They are available at auto parts stores.
     
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  9. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

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    I agree, but also recommend a couple of the smaller sized easy-outs. I bought Irwin because that’s what Lowe’s had when I needed them. Like $5 for a properly sized bit and the screw extractor.
     
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  10. theotherwaldo

    theotherwaldo Member

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    I've also modified a few Torx driver bits for just this type of situation. They may scar up the interior of the hex drive head but they eliminate the slack that leads to failure.
     
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  11. Hookeye

    Hookeye Member

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    To add...............don't use cheap Allen wrenches.
    If you ever slip one, dress it or get a new one.

    Also.............when using a Dremel........masking tape. a couple of layers on the side of the receiver.
    A fat roll of it makes a usable bench block too ;)
     
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  12. Hookeye

    Hookeye Member

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    FWIW I'd have cut the slots like the OP.
    Bought new after.

    Now in the old lab, I did have an air driven cutter, mounted in XYZ slide, on a plate w a microscope/swing arm.
    Bet they threw it away when I got laid off.
     
  13. BigBL87

    BigBL87 Member

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    Yaaaaa, I had masking tape on the table but didn't use it.:( Funny enough, it was also my bench block before I bought an actual bench block, so totally with you on that, haha.

    I avoid Allen wrenches whenever I can. With doing this, I was actually using the screwdriver and bit from my Wheeler Space Saver kit. Guessing either the bit or screws weren't to spec, probably the screws based on some working and some not.
     
  14. chicharrones

    chicharrones needs more ammo

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    I've used masking tape. Unless I use a lot of layers, a dremel tool skips right through even with a glancing blow.

    After a few missteps I've had with masking tape, whether by dremel or hand held file, I prefer a few layers of good duct tape on top of one layer of masking tape. The trick is for me to actually use tape for a quick repair like this as I tend to think "I won't mess this up this time". :D
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2018
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  15. MistWolf

    MistWolf Member

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    Why? Drilling the heads off is a lot less work.
     
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  16. chicharrones

    chicharrones needs more ammo

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    I can guess.

    When I use a hand held drill, the likelihood of me going off center in the screw is very high. Which means I'm drilling into the threaded portion of the screw, which means I'm about to drill into the threaded portion of the hole the screw is in.

    With a drill press, this is much less likely for me. But, in my line of work as a field tech, I don't get to take a drill press with me.
     
  17. someguy2800

    someguy2800 Member

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    I think the Birchwood Casey flat black touch up pen will be a really good match for that finish. I have one. Cold bluing will not match well at all on a dark matte finish like that. It will just turn the scratches a purplish color.
     
  18. CaptTripps

    CaptTripps Member

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    Hey OP! I probably would leave it alone. But if you can't leave it alone, I would use a bluing pen, make sure you really clean and degrease the area. it helps to warm the area up also, with a heat gun or even a BIC lighter. Next time you try to remove loctied sccrews, try a solder pen or even remove the action from the stock and warm it in the oven. 250F for an hour should do it and you willl not hurt the heat treatment. Hope this helps!
     
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  19. MistWolf

    MistWolf Member

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    That's the beauty of this situation. The part of the mount where the screw passes through it isn't threaded. All you gotta do is drill deep enough to snap the head off. The head will snap off long before you drill deep enough to damage the receiver. If you take a small ball rotary file and round out the receptacle in the head first, it will keep your drill bit centered and keep the bit from breaking. All you gotta do is choose a drill bit just smidge smaller than the screw. Easy as cake. For example, a #10 drill bit works for 10-32 (3/16ths) scews.
     
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