TRAPPING -MINK - MUSKRAT - FISHER - BEAVER

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Highland Lofts, Sep 9, 2021.

  1. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    Any one do any trapping here?
    I will be taking my grandson back to Upstate New York for the last two weeks of October. Fisher trapping will be open for the last week of our trip and could use some pointer on catching them.

    Then I will be going back to Upstate New for just under a month for deer season and my brother wants to run a trap line for mink - muskrat - raccoon - beaver and maybe fox h coyote.
    We have been picking up traps and supplies.

    If any one has trapping experience some help would be much appreciated.

    If any one has any traps to sell we could use more of them.

    What sets are the most productive for you?

    This could be an interesting thread.

    I have been watching a lot of YouTube videos on trapping.

    I like the Hoosier trapping videos.
     
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  2. courtgreene

    courtgreene Member

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    I'm interested in this tread, because while I know a few people here trap, I do not know who is willing to admit it (other than you, you brave soul) on an internet that is virulently anti-hunting and uses trapping as the "bait" to snare the emotions of the uninformed. I live in black bear country. We get a lot of that "illegal trapping!!!!!" Everyone thinks anything they don't like is illegal, by the way. As one who is not anti- I'm hopeful that some will jump on so I can learn from those who know of which they speak instead of those who just spout off emotionally.
     
  3. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator Staff Member

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    I’d enjoy learning to trap I don’t know anything about it.
     
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  4. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    I have trapped raccoon in the past but that was only fun while I was in middle school.

    GON forum has some trappers on there who talk about it. Mostly coyote from what I have seen.

    I didn’t know trapping was so frowned upon by the ignoramuses.
     
  5. ericuda

    ericuda Member

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    Used to trap beaver and muskrat using 120 and 330 conibers placed at den entrance or funneled to a underwater trail. Not sure if pelt is prime in October, been 20 years for me and I had better luck in late winter with ice on the cricks and ponds.
     
  6. Ranger99

    Ranger99 Member

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    I do nuisance trapping for myself.
    Pelts aren't worth anything in this
    region, so I don't waste any time
    trying to skin anything out
     
  7. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    Fisher trapping is only open for one week, no limit, last week of October so there is no choice on that one.
    That is part of the two week trip back east in October plus take my grandson small game hunting.

    When I go back for four weeks in November to go deer hunting water trapping opens and everything is fair game.
    My brother, my two sons and myself would like hides we caught tanned so we can hang them in our gun rooms.
    I have been watching trapping videos on YouTube and have been seeing how to make some sets and where to set traps.
    Hoosier trapping supplies has some very nice videos on you tube.
    I figured this forum being so big and all across the country we could have a nice discussion on the subject and some of us could benefit from the discussion.
    I have been ordering trapping supplies. So has my brother and oldest son.
    Now its is time to.order baits and scents.
     
  8. ericuda

    ericuda Member

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    No money in it anymore for the amount of work required, esp,for beaver.
     
  9. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    When we catch anything and skin it out we will take the hides to Sivco in canasteo ny to get tanned for wall hangers. Anything extra we will give to them..
     
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  10. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    I know just enough to get in trouble, and I'm good at placing rat traps lol. Gunmechanic on here my chim in, he's my buddy that lives by me. His dad used to trap a bunch gm did some trapping to. Those dog proof traps are nice for the raccoons, the havahart can be very affective. gm's dad I remember had a coon so big the trap looked like a fur ball one time we were over his house. Think they used some kind of attract the raccoons, sardines work to I think.

    I know how the beaver and muskrat trapping works I'm to fat to be doing that tho lol. I've caught a bunch of skunks in the havatart traps around the house, there always fun messing with. For the minks and like I see them do the limb at a 45 with the trap at the top.
     
  11. Dale Alan

    Dale Alan Member

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    Beaver makes for some good eating , tail and all . Fresh hunting camp meat is a good thing . It's not venison but it's pretty darn good .
     
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  12. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    Even the best trapper in the world can't catch an animal where there aren't any. First thing you need to know is the population of the animals you want to trap in the area you are going to trap in. If certain populations are low, it could be not worth the effort to even set traps for that species and one is better off to focus on those species that are more common. Muskrats are the easiest to trap and I did well with slide and/or bank/den sets. If populations are high, feed bed and float sets also work. Raccoon are also relatively easy if there are a lot around, but I prefer to use the newer enclosed foothold traps for dryland sets to prevent getting dogs and cats. Hunting dogs are easily attracted to baits used for trapping. Most mink/ermine I have caught were caught in rat or coon sets. Fox and 'yotes are difficult at best, especially if they have been exposed to trapping before. It takes a good knowledge of the area and reading sign in order to be productive. During and after deer season, gut piles and carcasses are good spots to set for both as they will return to the area to feed until the food source is gone. Set traps on the trails away from the carcass/gut pile to keep from catching scavengers like vultures and eagles. If some states it may be illegal to set using meat for bait. Know the rules. If there is snow, it is easy to find trails regularly used by both. Urine sets like a post set or flat/hole set work well in areas where they regularly travel. Of course, an active den is a no-brainer. But setting on top of it will probably mean only one animal and then the den will be abandoned. Setting traps away from the den on regularly used trails will be more successful and you can move closer to the den as you catch an animal. Foxes and 'yotes are particularly wary of human scent and actively. Leave as little trace as you can.

    Trapping and being successful at it takes dedication and time. One reason I rarely do it anymore. It was more of a hobby when I was young and did not have the obligations I do now and had the time it takes to check and set/reset a line every day. Snow, freezing rain and freezing temps may make so sets need to be reworked daily or set with paper above.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2021
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  13. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    For trap pan covers what's your favorite choice?

    I use to use like a screen type fabric.
    I seen on a video they were using wax paper.
     
  14. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    Just bought two dozen 220 Conibear traps and a KORO trap and plywood cubby. Pretty neat trap.


    20210912_124143.jpg 20210912_100857.jpg 20210912_100841.jpg
     
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  15. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    I used wax paper squares like those used in restaurants. They were just the right size for most trap sizes and was handier than cutting/making my own.
     
  16. BKS

    BKS Member

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    I am getting back into trapping this year after being out of it for several years. Like posted above the hides aren't really worth much from here but I like catching them anyway. I water trap mostly, I really like catching beaver. My goal is a beaver blanket for the wife next year, some mittens, etc. I don't do much land trapping simply because I don't have a place to leave traps set for an extended time. Ive trapped beaver with snares, body grips, and foot holds. Those big body grips can really hurt you. I refuse to use any of them other than the Belisle due to their safety and trigger design. Snares can be used just about anywhere a body grip can. Try to make your beaver sets where is is easier for you to get to, they are territorial and will come to your lure/bait within reason. ie you don't want to walk 1/2-3/4 of a mile carrying one after the catch if you can get him to come to you. If you wont be trapping out of a vehicle or atv, go ahead and buy some type of handle to use to carry beaver and raccoons. Their feet are tapered and are tough to hold on to.
    Ill be doing the majority of my beaver trapping this year with double long springs and long chains like the mountain men did it, just because.
     
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  17. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    For beaver we will mostly be useing conibear traps. I will be buying a few large leg hold traps.
    With fur prices being so low there is a bunch of target animals where we will be setting up plus we will have all day/every day to hunt and trap.
    I am going to see if Sivco, a tannery will trade hides in exchange for tanning our hides.
    They are in Canasteo New York, we had them tan four deer hides for us, $75 a hide.
    I was going to buy some hides for wall hangers but after they are tanned cabelas think they are gold.
    Plus trapping them personally make them more special.
     
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  18. BKS

    BKS Member

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    Yes it does. Good Luck
    Tight Chains and Prime Fur.
     
  19. Random 8

    Random 8 Member

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    I did a lot of trapping 20-30 years ago. I also trapped muskrats extensively a few different years since when prices were up. I have recreationally trapped beaver along the way to procure raw material for getting some garments made, but I find beaver to be a bit labor intensive for my taste to be financially viable unless prices are way up which seems unlikely.

    Basic gear: Muskrat are easy. There are 2 basic traps that one could consider "bread and butter." The #1 longspring and the #110 "connibear" or generic body grip. I actually prefer the Sleepy Creek brand 1 1/2 longspring as it has more weight for drowning and will hold a raccoon, but the #1 is a longtime standby for rat trapping and will work fine. Buy quality traps here, sleepy creek are the best, and cost the most. They are more durable, reliable, and weigh more for drowning. The #110 ( I use cheap Duke brand) is another all purpose "kill" trap that does not require drowning and is versatile for various sets...more on that to follow. I've found no need to buy the higher quality with these. When you add mink and raccoon into the mix, a few specialty traps come into play. The #11 longspring (2x #1 springs), the #1 coilspring, and the #1 1/2 coilspring (raccoon specific, but will take mink and muskrat). For beaver, the #280 and #330 bodygrip are your go-to. I'd avoid footholds and drowning locks as an amateur for beaver. Drowning locks: You should have some of these for mink-specific sets. Bodygrip setter: You'll need this for the beaver traps. Swivels: Your quality coilsprings and #11s will have these as factory standards. If you go cheap, you'll have to retrofit. Rebar stakes: You'll need some of these for shallow water bank sets for raccoon, mink and muskrat. Not needed to hold a rat, but the others are commonly encountered here, so firmly staking your trap is a must. You can buy pre-made or make your own. Wire...I usually use high tensile steel fence wire. This is for a "drowning leash" on your rat sets, and a drowning slide on bank sets for mink. A quality hatchet.

    Muskrat sets: (beaver also at bottom).
    House or feeder slide set. Find where they enter and leave the water on their feeder and den huts. Place your longspring trap just under the water here with a 4' wire to ensure they reach deep enough water to drown. Stake it firmly with a sapling pole.
    Funnel or run set. Use your #110 bodygrip in a location where they are swimming through a constricted area. You'll find "trails" cut through the weeds between feeding and denning areas (you can also find them by bubble trails under clear ice), and also bank runs with an entrance under the water or entrances to primary den huts. Cover these trails with a 110 staked firmly to the bottom with sapling poles. You may need to push in some additional reeds or sticks to funnel them through the trap. Muskrat are very buoyant, and tend to swim near the surface. The top of your trap should nearly break the surface. Any submerged Beaver set is an upsized version of this. I like to wire a partially peeled red osier dogwood stick to the trigger as an added atractant for beaver.

    Not really going to get into mink sets here, as it's late and I need my sleep, and mink trapping is a complicated business. Cut your teeth on rats, then get back to the mink.
     
  20. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    Random
    Nice write up. I will be ordering more supplies this weekend. I have been picking up the 120 conibears. I will be ordering some 1 1/2 coilsprings.
    I watched videos on the 3/8 inch rod sets and will be buying the trap brackets and spring steel bait holders for open water rat trapping.
    For bridge mink sets what do you thing about putting minnows on the conibear trigger?
     
  21. gunmechanic

    gunmechanic Member

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    The best set i used for fisher is a running pole set .Fisher like pines so it is best to place your set there .fish based lure worked best for me.
     
  22. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    I watched a YouTube video on making mink bait that should work for fisher.
    I will post it when I have more time.
     
  23. Ranger99

    Ranger99 Member

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    JMHO- I would recommend using a safety
    when handling the larger double spring
    body grips (160 up)
    Getting your hand smushed is pretty rough
    and i don't know about other folks, but it
    makes me weak to where it's not easy to
    get the thing off your hand
    They're not but about $5.00
     
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  24. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    I already bought a Bridger conibear safety off of ebay for $12.
     
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  25. MacAR

    MacAR Member

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    I still put a line out every fall, more for fun than anything.

    This is pretty much me. I trap coon, possum, and skunk mostly. Will catch a few 'yotes and the odd bobcat. I like to use the old jump traps for the smaller critters, or 1 and 1 1/2 long springs, and 1 1/2 Victor coils for coons. A Victor #2 is my favorite for 'yotes and cats. It's mostly for my enjoyment, so doing things the "old" way is a lot of fun to me. Don't do much water trapping anymore. Most of those critters have been trapped out of this area, and they don't bother me anyway.

    When I trapped them, I had an old man that wanted every beaver carcass I could bring him. He finally got me to try one once, and ever since then, I've been hooked. They're a dark meat, but the eat well. About like a groundhog, just not quite as tough.

    I always used the little pre-cut screen covers if I had them. When I was a lad I used a big oak or maple leaf believe it or not. Still do sometimes. The less I can carry with me the better, as I trap on foot and so weight is a consideration. Also, if it hasn't already been mentioned, a good pack-basket is worth it's weight in gold. A good small shovel is handy, too. I use an old German trench tool. It's sharpened all the way around so it can be used to chop roots or limbs and dig a trap bed. And, the spike makes a good bait hole digger.

    Good luck!

    Mac
     
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