Quantcast

Trigger Squeeze - Army Training Film

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by PTMCCAIN, May 15, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. PTMCCAIN

    PTMCCAIN member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    545
  2. browningguy

    browningguy Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Messages:
    4,655
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    The old ways still work don't they.
     
  3. taliv

    taliv Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2004
    Messages:
    25,181
    gonna have to non-concur on that one.

    "squeeze/surprise" is certainly not the preferred method these days for pistols, ARs or precision rifles. the parallel thing was kinda funny too
     
  4. JAV8000

    JAV8000 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2009
    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Ft. Riley, Kansas
    When shooting for precision, I still squeeze the trigger until surprised. This is the best way to deal with various and always less than spectacular Army triggers. The trick is to be confident in your surprise.....if that makes any sense. I'm on my way to sniper section, this means and method has gotten me there.
     
  5. taliv

    taliv Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2004
    Messages:
    25,181
    hey good luck in selection!

    i have been wrong before, but my understanding is that they only teach the 'surprise' method after a shooter is struggling. It's not plan A.

    The downside of the method obviously, is that you have to keep the gun pointed at the target the whole time you're waiting for the surprise, which can be extremely challenging from positions other than prone, or with moving targets. Fortunately, E types are a lot more forgiving than the bullseyes

    http://www.odcmp.org/1207/default.asp?page=USAMU_TC
     
  6. PTMCCAIN

    PTMCCAIN member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    545
    Could it be that in the stress of combat they wanted to make sure the guys were squeezing and avoiding flinch and so they emphasized the "surprise" break?

    I can't imagine ever remaining calm enough to be squeezing off shots like a day on the firing line at the range, but....perhaps they were so concerned that they would just start jerking the trigger under stress they used this method?

    Just wondering.
     
  7. gunnysmith

    gunnysmith Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2004
    Messages:
    113
    Location:
    Wyoming
    Myself I adhere to this school of thought:

    I have used the European "roll over" trigger exclusively.
    Smooth even take up with no change of weight to break.
    Over travel adjustment stops trigger at break.

    Concerning trigger terminology:

    There is a lot of confusion in this area,
    and I've heard many experienced shooters use the same terms to describe
    different things. Most US target pistol triggers have 2 distinct 'stages'.
    There is some 'slack' at the begining, which is a light pull, frequently
    with a fair amount of travel. Then the trigger stops, and the pull
    increases abruptly. As the pressure is increased, there is no significant
    motion. When the release pressure is reached, the trigger 'breaks', and
    the gun fires. The trigger will move slightly at this point, and the
    'overtravel' is frequently limited by a screw.

    The other style of trigger pull usually starts with the same 'slack', but once that is taken up, the trigger moves (sometimes quite a bit) as the pressure is increased. This is what I call a 'rollover' trigger pull.

    I think some European shooters call this a 'two stage' trigger pull, which can be confused with what most US shooters call the first type. The 2nd stage of a rollover trigger pull should be smooth.

    The term 'creep' is usually used to describe a roughness in the motion of the trigger, and it can be very distracting.
    I find it easiest to get a 'surprise shot' (the holy grail of top notch
    pistol shooters)
    with the breaking trigger, with no discernable travel in
    the 2nd stage. Many top shooters prefer the 'rollover' trigger, and most
    european guns come set up this way.

    The better guns all have several screws to adjust the amount of 'slack' (sometimes called 'takeup'), trigger weight ('pull'), and aftertravel. Many can be adjusted for the amount of 2nd stage motion before firing, others take some cafeful work by a gunsmith to adjust.

    The one other thing you may run into in a trigger is 'play'.
    This is used to describe a side-to-side looseness in the trigger. This
    indicates worn or cheap parts. I have heard that the factory aluminum
    triggers on Rugers are prone to this, which is why every serious Ruger
    shooter I know has had a 'trigger job' done. This invariably involves putting
    in an after-market steel trigger.
     
  8. FlyinBryan

    FlyinBryan Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,795
    Location:
    TEXAS
    to be honest i do the surprise method, but not really intentionally.

    its a really short wait though. i cant hold indefinitely, so when i find what i think is perfect i squeeze through the pull fairly quickly, but technically it is a surprise. i would estimate the time applying pressure somewhere in the one second range when shooting for accuracy.
     
  9. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2006
    Messages:
    12,993
    Location:
    In a part of Utah that resembles Tattooine.
    I do still tell my soldiers who are struggling with the basics to just squeeze and let it surprise them. The ones that surprise are the ones that hit.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice