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Trying Something New

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Bobson, Jan 3, 2012.

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  1. Bobson

    Bobson Member

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    I have three questions I want to ask, and each is on a different topic. Short of starting three threads (at least one of which is likely to be limited to a very short number of responses before being answered in full), I thought I might ask all in the same thread.

    First: A gun for my wife. I understand the whole "let her test a bunch" thing, and I plan to. However, I had a question about Glocks specifically. I've known for quite a while that Glock offers a compensated version of the G21 (the G21C). Today, I learned they also make a G19C and G23C. My question is regarding the effectiveness of a compensator on a 9mm or 40S&W. My wife is sensitive to recoil - she hated shooting my XD40. But she likes the feel/look/design of a Glock. I'm hoping she'll pick a gun in 9mm or larger caliber. Is it likely that the G19C or G23C will have noticeably lesser recoil than a standard G19 or G23? Does anyone own either of these compensated Glocks? If so, what's your opinion of it/them?

    Second: Need my dad to send me my shotgun. He has it at his home in Washington state. I live in Arizona. Does he need to take it to an FFL, pay, and have them send it to an FFL here in AZ, where I'll pay and then pick it up? If so, what's the best way to go about this? Should I just start calling FFLs near my dad (in WA) and ask if they'll agree to ship to my local FFL here in AZ?

    Third: Looking to get a guard dog. I know this isn't related to guns, and I apologize. Was going to post it in S/T/T but didn't want to add unnecessary threads. Here's the thing: I'm a fairly heavy sleeper. My wife and I are house-sitting for her mom while she's out of state for a week. Her mom's house has an alarm system that beeps (fairly loudly) when someone enters through a door or window, assuming the alarm is set. We set it last night before bed. We woke this morning, and her sister (who has a key and knows the alarm code) was chilling in the kitchen, eating. I know the alarm went off between her opening the front door and disarming the alarm (maybe a 10-second time span), but it wasn't enough to wake me from my sleep, which worries me. Had she been a burglar (or home-invader with other objective), how long would it take me to hear the house alarm and wake up? Thirty seconds? 60? Any amount that would make it "too late?" So we want to get a dog soon. If nothing else, I trust that a dog will make a much more effective night-time alarm than anything else.

    I value the opinions and advice I pick up here from THR members much more than anywhere else on the net (whether that's good or bad can be debated another time), so while I will check other areas online, I really want to get any advice from you guys/gals. We will be house-training the dog and it will live in the home with us, so we want a short-haired dog that isn't prone to drooling all over the place. We also want a medium to medium-large dog. We have a one year old daughter and plan to start trying for our second child sometime this year, so it needs to be a breed that's good with children. I was thinking an American Staffordshire Terrier. I know people view pit bulls as being particularly violent and untrustworthy, but I know firsthand that they can be extremely loyal and protective family dogs.

    Without debating the qualities and/or effectiveness of a dog as an intruder alarm, are there any other breeds we should be considering? Thank you very much for any advice, regarding any of the three questions/topics I brought up.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  2. lowerunit411

    lowerunit411 Member

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    cant answer the first 2 questions but we have a pair of giant schnauzers...great dogs, very smart, adaptable, formidable and have all of the traits youd want in a companion. The Giant Schnauzer is among the oldest breeds used for work in law-enforcement and the military. If you ever see one, you wont soon forget it.
     
  3. NavyLCDR

    NavyLCDR member

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    You call FFLs near you and find the cheapest one that will accept the shotgun from a private party. Dad takes the shotgun to the nearest post office and mails it to the FFL near you who will transfer it to you. The receiving FFL would probably appreciate a copy of your dad's driver's license or ID card to be included with the shotgun.

    There is no need to involve a Washington FFL - and since shotguns are maileable by private parties, there is no shipping cost savings in doing so.

    I have not had any experience with compensated Glocks, but I would think that the compensator would only reduce muzzle rise making for quicker follow-on shots and not do much to reduce recoil.

    If you want low recoil, get a nice heavy gun like the Taurus PT-92 or Berretta FS-92
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  4. The_Next_Generation

    The_Next_Generation Member

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    Our neighbors have a Black Russian Terrier. If you can handle their size and strength, they seem to be VERY good guard dogs, and are very obedient. However, I would not recommend one if you plan on having many small children (that are 'strangers' to the dog) in your house at any time. We used to have a German Shepard that served us very well. They are smart, fast, and friendly (although, maybe too friendly/not loud enough for waking you up because of an intruder).

    The Black Russian Terrier is very loud when it barks, which is at anyone approaching the house.

    Unfortunately, I am inexperienced with the compensated glocks. However, I believe that your father can ship the shotgun without an FFL. But it must be shipped to an FFL. I.e. Talk to your LGS and arrange for the shipment (FFL transfer fees/etc.), Dad goes to FedEx store with shotgun all boxed up, and mails it to your local LGS. You pick it up, pay the fee and do whatever else must be done, and be on your way.

    I am sure there are others who can help more with this, but here is a link to the FedEx page regarding shipments of firearms:

    http://www.fedex.com/us/service-guide/terms/express-ground/index.html
    (click 'firearms')

    - TNG
     
  5. NavyLCDR

    NavyLCDR member

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  6. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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    As far as the Glocks, I dont know that the comp is the way to go. I think the minuses out weigh what little might be gained in muzzle flip and recoil reduction. Id go with a standard 17, work on her technique, and get her shooing on a regular basis. The 9mm Glocks are pretty soft shooters, and much nicer to shoot with than the .40's, especially for new shooters.


    As to the dog question, Rottweilers are a great breed, that are very protective of their family, and great with kids. They are also great with visitors you allow in, as long as they are well behaved (the people :) ).

    You dont need to train them to be "guard dogs", but they are strong willed, and you do need to be the alpha. With any of them, obedience training is a must.

    We have two, and not much gets by them. No one gets in the house or yard without you knowing about it. If its someone they know, they go happy nuts, if its someone they dont, they look like 250 pounds of black muscle and white teeth . :)
     
  7. Bobson

    Bobson Member

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    Navy, thanks for your input, as always. Will definitely give the M9 some consideration if my wife decides she doesn't enjoy shooting the G19.

    Rottweilers... I was given a Rottweiler puppy for Christmas when I was 13 or 14 (after begging nearly all year). When I was 18 ('03), I left home for the Air Force, and Kino (my rottweiler) became my parents' dog. In 2007, I was visiting my parents while on leave, and out taking the dog for a walk. Long story short, he ended up attacking me (and no, he hadn't ever been beaten; not by me, my parents, or anyone else). The scars on my left arm, chin, and the inside of my lip are an everyday reminder of it. I'm honestly not sure I'd like another. Nothing against the breed, I just don't know that I want to spend time with one every day.

    Thanks for all the input. Will definitely consider everything.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  8. Bobson

    Bobson Member

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    What downsides are there to a compensator? I didn't realize there are any downsides, aside from costing $28 more than an uncompensated model.
     
  9. bratch

    bratch Member

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    Increased noise, increased blow back, if your wife ever shoots from a retention position there is a chance she could burn herself, I know of very few trainers who recommend compensated pistols for defense.

    You may have her try out the Kahr and M&P line many women like them.

    You may check with your homeowners insurance several have black listed dog breeds that they will not cover.
     
  10. Bobson

    Bobson Member

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    Good to know regarding compensators, thank you.

    And thanks for mentioning the insurance thing. We'll make sure to be mindful of that. May very well be a reason to change companies if they ban a breed we decide on.
     
  11. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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    The insurance thing is a pretty big issue if you dont already have homeowners insurance and have the dog.

    We went through it about 6 years ago when we moved to a new house. After 30 years with Nationwide, and having Rotties while we were covered with them, they all of a sudden refused to give us homeowners on the new house because of the dogs. With settlement looming, no homeowners insurance, no mortgage, panic started to set in. We had the same trouble with most of the other companies we called too. We ended up with State Farm through the agent in a town close to where we were buying the house. They only asked if there was a bite history and/or attack training. Everyone else flat out wouldnt do it, or required all sorts of hoops be jumped through, along with higher rates if they did issue it.


    This list will give you an idea....

    http://www.bankrate.com/finance/insurance/11-dogs-that-could-raise-your-insurance-costs.aspx
     
  12. bratch

    bratch Member

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    If you can find breeds that are not really popular you will have better luck with your insurance, I'm not sure if they use total number of bites per breed, public opinion or some mixture to determine what breeds go on their list. We have a Belgian Malinois that I never seen black listed.
     
  13. ApacheCoTodd

    ApacheCoTodd Member

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    Glock? Can't speak to that.

    FFL? Yup unless he drives it down or flies.

    Guard dog? First check your homeowners insurance for issues. I'm a whompin' fan of say, Rotweillers but they're a no-go with our insurance. The fella suggesting the Giant Schnauzer is on to something great. Intimidating, very protective, relatively social, gentle with kids, non-alergenic and a socially acceptable, big fuzzy-wuzzy tooth and bark holder. Be certain that the Schnauzer bonds well to both you and your wife, they can get to be a bit of a one-person dog if allowed to the point of a raised voice being an eye opening experience.
     
  14. 1894

    1894 Member

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    Can't speak to the Glock issue but I have recently shot a PX4 that was real easy to shoot. A first timer (petite female) said it was her favorite because it was easiest to control.

    For the dogs, you don't need any specific breed. Just a good dog that feels like it's part of a pack - with you as the alpha. They will all protect the pack. Also, some small dogs are more prone to bark than larger ones. Maybe the larger ones don't feel the need - not sure. But if all you want is an alarm to go off - something like a Jack Russell, Scottie, etc. might fill your need without the insurance issues.

    Navy was right on the shipping, though I'd use UPS instead of USPS. Better experiences (and tracking) that way.
     
  15. NavyLCDR

    NavyLCDR member

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    FFL is required even if he does drive it down or flies. It's still an interstate transfer between two residents of different states. Only on the receiving end, though, not the sending/giving end.
     
  16. ApacheCoTodd

    ApacheCoTodd Member

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    I was thinking private party sale between two Arizonans.
     
  17. lowerunit411

    lowerunit411 Member

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    we have had several giant schnauzers and cant say enough good about them. difficult to find a breeder at times and not inexpensive but they are very intelligent, easy to train, loving and great with kids, dont shed and unless your looking for a show dog, not hard to keep well groomed. They command attention to be sure. big lovable babies...unless they need be otherwise.
     

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