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Underage possesion of a firearm VA

Discussion in 'Legal' started by Dreamcast270mhz, Jan 27, 2011.

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  1. Dreamcast270mhz

    Dreamcast270mhz Member

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    I have a cousin whose night stand has a loaded Glock 17 9mm in it. He is 14. His father bought the gun for him. Is it illegal for him to shoot it on private property with his father not supervising him? (The property owner is family and doesn't care.)

    He also has rifles in his room, not locked up or anything. Is it illegal for him to shoot them unsupervised on the same property?
     
  2. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    Sorry, the answer should have been "No, it is not illegal"...I misread.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2011
  3. Dreamcast270mhz

    Dreamcast270mhz Member

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    What about supervised?
     
  4. kingpin008

    kingpin008 Member

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    Well, if it's not illegal for him to shoot unsupervised, I'd imagine it's not illegal for him to shoot supervised. More supervision rarely becomes less legal than less supervision, right?
     
  5. NavyLCDR

    NavyLCDR member

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    YES! IT IS ILLEGAL FOR HIM TO SHOOT IT UNSUPERVISED! Except in self defense. You need to read 18 USC 922 (x)!

    Unless... he is in engaged in target practice, with the WRITTEN consent of the parents, and the written consent of the parents is in his possession.
     
  6. Dreamcast270mhz

    Dreamcast270mhz Member

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    I'm getting conflicting answers, I want to know whats on VA's books
     
  7. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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  8. NavyLCDR

    NavyLCDR member

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    Even if it violates Federal law?
     
  9. Floppy_D

    Floppy_D Member In Memoriam

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    Which is what happens on forums.

    Sure. We're not lawyers, so this advice is worth what you paid for it:
    Here.
     
  10. Davek1977

    Davek1977 Member

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    NavyLT pointed you in the right direction....Federal law trumps state law in this case, amking hats on the books in VA...or any other state...irrelavent in the matter
     
  11. brickeyee

    brickeyee Member

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    http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+18.2-56.2


    And
    http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+18.2-308.7

    And federal law still preempts.
     
  12. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    From reading 922 and the VA law, a 14-year-old only needs the written permission from his parents for him to be fully legal in his shooting, solo, on the family property.

    The sticky part is the part of the VA law which says, "It shall be unlawful for any person under 18 years of age to knowingly and intentionally...transport a handgun or assault firearm anywhere in the Commonwealth."

    ("Possess" does not apply in this circumstance.)

    If the shooting property is elsewhere from the residence, an adult must be involved in moving handguns and assault firearms between them.
     
  13. NavyLCDR

    NavyLCDR member

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    and that complies with the Federal law, too, so long as the minor is in actual physical possession of the written permission of the parents.
     
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