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Unemployment good way to curb desire to purchase firearms

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Sheepdog1968, May 1, 2015.

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  1. Sheepdog1968

    Sheepdog1968 Member

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    In the early 2000's I went through two layoffs in three years. It kept me frugal (last car had about 185K miles on it before I replaced it due to up reliability). I have had steady employment for 11 years and have recently been let go. As if by magic, I find I really don't want anything other than some ammo now and then to shoot. A few months ago I could rattle off a list of wants. I won't need to sell anything I own and hopefully I should be working in a month or two. I hope this brief respite from works stays in my memory for a while so I put my earnings to better uses. How about you? Did a bout of employment keep you on the straight and narrow re gun purchases for a while?
     
  2. chicharrones

    chicharrones needs more ammo

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    I've had constant employment for the last 28 years straight. However, I have feared losing my job every other year in the 2000s and have had my pay go up and down several times this century.

    So, yes I do find myself wanting to retract from the expense of firearms from time to time. In fact, while my collection is small compared to what I hear on the net, I consider myself full up and don't need to by another gun. I just want to shoot what I got, within financial reason.

    In hindsight, shooting is an expensive sport. I'll probably reduce myself to only self defense handgun practice in the coming years. As much as I like shooting long guns more than handguns, that will be somewhat hard to do.
     
  3. 1911 guy

    1911 guy Member

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    For most of us, guns and associated stuff are wants, not needs. When we have "disposable" income, we find ways to spend it. When we don't have the money, our wants drop way down the list as we provide for our needs.

    I've been exceedingly blessed to be employed by the same company for the last 22 years. My income has fluctuated with the manufacturing sector, as has my spending on hobbies, including guns and related stuff.
     
  4. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    Unemployment is a good way to curb desire to do a lot of things. Eating well, going anywhere, doing anything, buying anything but absolute necessities. Had a heart attack and quad by-pass 2 years ago, fired for it and haven't worked since. Nobody wants anybody over 40 either. Worse being an experienced computer tech over 30 too.
     
  5. Kookla

    Kookla Member

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    Hope you get work soon.
     
  6. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    I have only been unemployed once since I was 16. I lost a job due to the company closing. I was eligible for extended unemployment benefits and education benefits. I collected one week's worth of unemployment then took a low paying benefitless job. I made $15 bucks less every two weeks working than I would have collecting unemployment. I worked that job 3 months and lived on beans. I didn't buy anything unnecessary. That low paying job lead to the good paying job with great benefits that I have had for the past 23 years.
     
  7. readyeddy

    readyeddy Member

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    When I was younger I spent money much more freely and I bought way more guns than I needed. And now, yes, finances, or the lack thereof, definitely affects my gun buying.

    But of all the stuff I blew my money on when I was young, guns are the one thing that has held its value. The girls, the parties, the toys and the cars have all come and gone. Good times no doubt, but only the memories are left.

    The guns, on the other hand, are still shiny and firing. Some are no longer in production or cannot be imported and are desireable. But that's just an aside. They are old friends and I appreciate them even more now that I can't afford to replace them.
     
  8. RugerBob

    RugerBob Member

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    I agree with the OP.
    But I did buy some when others were laid off. I made some less then fair deals with people, but since I knew them I drew up a contract that they could rebuy said firearm back for exact same amount within the next 365 days. So far I have ended up owning all 4 of them that happened to. One I resold, the other 3 never will.
    Unless hard times hit me that is.
    It's been over 2 years now and none seem interested in getting the others back.
    Just my 2 cents.
     
  9. likesguns

    likesguns Member

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    A divorce has similar results.........experience.
     
  10. Normandy

    Normandy Member

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    Not only unemployed, I'm living on social security. Savings went in the huge stock market decline in 2001.
    I haven't owned all the guns I want to own, but I'm usually up for a trade, or sell one so I can buy another. Fortunately, I acquired a decent collection when I was working.
     
  11. DHJenkins

    DHJenkins Member

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    I couldn't disagree more. No matter my situation my desire is never curbed - only my spending ability.
     
  12. ku4hx

    ku4hx Member

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    Nothing curbs the desire, but as far as reduced income ... been there; done that. Wife got laid off and the loss of approximately 50% of your family income definitely forces a paradigm shift. Luckily she could fall back on her contractor status but for a while buying habits definitely changed.
     
  13. btg3

    btg3 Member

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  14. huntsman

    huntsman Member

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    After enduring 3 plant Closings in 22 years I've learned frugality and self control in all purchases but especially firearms.
     
  15. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    Not unemployment, as the longest I've been out of work since I was 16 is a week and a half.

    No, it was the last recession that did it for me. I remained employed, but as a flat rate mechanic, just because you're at work doesn't mean your making money. If there was nothing to work on in a given day, I made $0.00. My annual income for 2009 was $30k lower than 2007.

    I'm self employed now. Zero dollar days happen, but they are offset by the $1,000 days. My gross income is still lower than 2006/7, but net ends up about the same with the amount of write offs my type of business has.

    'Course, I also have 3 little mouths to feed that weren't around in '07, so my days of "gun a month" (or more) are over for the foreseeable.

    Fortunately, though, I learned my lesson after 2008. I hung in there for a couple more years, but had to file bankruptcy in 2010. I managed to refinance the house and settle the 2nd mortgate, and today I enjoy not having any monthly payments outside of mortgage, utilities and business expenses. No credit cards, no auto loans, nor any other type of outstanding balance beside the house. I drive a 13 year old Cadillac that I scored for $700 and sunk another $1,500 into parts, wife has a 14 year old SUV that I keep on the road, and we pay cash for everything. Life is much easier, much less stressful that way. And it means that whatever cash I have is mine; If you have $10k in the bank but owe $16k on credit cards and $32K on a car, then you don't actually have $10k.
     
  16. BSA1

    BSA1 Member

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    Ditto on not curbing the desire but instead refocuses on what I really need.

    Between being laid-off for 18 months, open heart surgery and the firearms and ammo Banic I have become less interested in acquiring guns and more focused in some completing some gunsmithing projects (finished installing a SRT in my SIG last weekend) and building up my reloading supplies.

    The next Banic is less than two years away so time is short.
     
  17. Ash

    Ash Member

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    I've been there, lost my job more or less right after Katrina. But the Lord took care of us and we are doing well now. Heck, I've got a new book out, got two great kids, and live on a place that is just perfect.

    I agree about the freedom of being out of debt (or getting there). I sold of most of my collection, save for a very view of my best, in order to purchase an antebellum house free-and-clear in the country on 4 acres. It seemed odd to buy a place to get out of debt, but we were able to sell our other house, keep a good bit of the money, and the only debt we have is my wife's car. While I did once own a Dragunov, a real deal Ishvesk, plus an NDM-86 and other arms, the freedom of being out of debt was well worth it.
     
  18. Deaf Smith

    Deaf Smith Member

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    A lesson to all.

    Pay off the credit cards. They are the worst debt one has.

    Pay off the house.

    Pay off the cars.

    Put some money in the bank.

    LIVE DEBT FREE.

    That way if one loses their job it will minimize the hardship.

    I say this cause my wife and I are debt free. Credit cards paid when due. Don't owe a dime.

    It took time, it ment not eating out so much. Having only low cost vacations. Skipping some outstanding gun buys.

    But it was done.

    Debt free folks is the life for me!

    Deaf
     
  19. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    To be in Architecture means riding the neaps and ebbs of the financial tide.

    2008 and the Second Depression changed all that. Unlike every U.S. recession in the last century, there was no rebound in 4-6 weeks. In fact, it has taken six years to drag an entire industry from immobility to just into the doldrums.

    I held on as best I could, from '08 to '11--but, with my bank closed, and even with selling 2/3 of my safe, it was just not enough, so I lost my house to foreclosure.

    As OP points out, this is an experience that educates, and that teaching is a hard thing. Curbed all sorts of desires, eating, sleeping well, let alone fun stuff.

    Curbed, not stopped. Even with only a few months in at a [excrement] job, I ran into a deal too good to pass up, and collected up a very nice .22lr rifle. Took three more jobs to get me back into architecture proper, and with a great firm and great boss. The Ft Worth gun show over at Will Rodgers will be sorely tempting tomorrow. This despite (or because of) only being two paychecks to the good.
     
  20. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    Amen, brother.

    I lived frugally for my first 20 years. I paid my house off by the time I was 38. I haven't had a car payment or any other installment payment in over 15 years.
     
  21. Rock185

    Rock185 Member

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    My wife and I had the good fortune to be in a profession where there were no layoffs and our employer's checks did not bounce. I admit I never was as frugal as I perhaps should have been.....
     
  22. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

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    Didn't work for me...I was laid off voluntarily a few years back (2008-2009 "recession") and one of my cheapest hobbies was browsing pawn shops and yard sales looking for deals to flip and make a few bucks...kept bringing stuff home, even when I wasn't getting paid unemployment, and even when unemployment check was gone as soon as bills were paid and my belly was full. My best trade ever at that time was trading off a detective special for a really nice Jon boat with 2 trolling motors and a full deck, live wells, etc...actually a nice boat. Suddenly unemployment checks were filling my gas tank, the boat was filling my freezer, and my friends were refilling my cabinets when I would invite them over for dinner. Only way to suppress a big hobby is with another big hobby.

    Still have the boat, never cared much for the way a colt revolver feels. Great trade...rough gun worth 250 ish for a boat worth 450 or 500.
     
  23. Ash

    Ash Member

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    And without the debt - and the interest that goes with it - your money goes much, much further. You find you can do much more than you ever could. Better yet, once you reach that threshold, you also find you are much safer with the money, not being given over to simple acquiring. It sure makes breathing easier.
     
  24. RetiredUSNChief

    RetiredUSNChief Member

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    Debt free is a goal everybody should be working hard to acheive.

    At one point my wife and I were so far in over our heads, not counting the house, that the tears were flowing. When I got overtime and travel opportunity, every nickle of extra money earned went to one bill until it was demolished. Then the monthly payment for that bill was added to the next, while I repeated the process.

    It's an AMAZING feeling when the last of every stinkin'debt is paid off. There is scads of money left from each paycheck when you don't have to pay four figures every month for credit cards and loans.

    I refuse to carry ANY balance on my credit cards any more. I use one card for just about every purchase and bill and then I go online with the credit union later the same day and immediately transfer funds from checking onto the card to pay it in full. Lots of rewards points earned and NO interest being paid.

    Life is SO much more stress free when you're in charge of the bills and debts instead of the other way around.

    As for employment...I've been steadily employed from before I started college back in the early 80s. I was always earning money as a teen, starting in junior high with several odd jobs a week, year round. When I started a "real" job, I was never unemployed more than a week. Then I spent 20 years in the Navy and I'm coming up on 10 at the shipyard now.

    Yeah...lack of funds, whatever the cause, puts a crimp on the wants, as well as the needs.
     
  25. justice06rr

    justice06rr Member

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    If employment (or lack thereof) is what keeps you buying and not buying guns, you should re-consider your spending habits.

    Even if someone is employed, your spending should have a clear budget for firearm purchases--after all your obligations are paid.

    sorry to hear that you are unemployed, but if you do get a job and start earning again, you should consider saving money instead of buying more guns.
     
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