Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Unusual revolver identification, help needed…

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Onty, Aug 7, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Onty

    Onty Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2003
    Messages:
    187
    About 40 years ago, as a kid, I had seen in Europe the revolver that I couldn’t find anywhere in reference books or websites. I know that this sounds strange but I would appreciate if you could take few minutes and read its description, there is always a chance that somebody could recognize it.

    1. Calibre: most likely 45
    2. DA/SA solid frame with right hand ejector rod and loading gate that swings backward
    3. Barrel about 6” (150 mm), octagonal, with pin style front sight
    4. Frame mounted firing pin, under slight upward angle

    As far as I could recall, the revolver was quite nicely finished with smooth surfaces and fairly sharp edges, corners and serration on the hammer.

    Any help is welcome. Thanks, Onty.
     
  2. Zundfolge

    Zundfolge Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    10,755
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
  3. Onty

    Onty Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2003
    Messages:
    187
    "Korth?"; No, it’s an older model, quite difference in appearance. Judging by its design, looks like it was made 1880-1900. Ejector rod is fixed/guided on right side in the frame. Same position like on SA Colt or Ruger, except there is no ejector housing, everything is guided in the bump/protrusion on right side of the frame. Ejector protrudes in front of the frame. There is no return spring, just small leaf spring that pressing in some kind of notch in the ejector, preventing its walking in front position.
     
  4. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    22,348
    Why didn't you ask 40 years ago?
    Oh, wait. Al Gore hadn't invented the Internet yet.

    Sounds like a 10.4mm Italian of 1872 or 1889; or an 11mm French of 1873.
    Watch 'The Mummy' closely to see the Mle. 1873 in action.

    But there were all manner of 11 mm +/- revolvers in Europe in the late 19th century.
     
  5. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    6,121
    Without more info it's going to be near impossible to ID the gun you saw.
    In the late 1880's and 90's there were a huge number of different revolvers made in Europe that meet your description.

    There were DA/SA revolvers with exposed side-mounted ejectors made in England, France, Belgium, Italy, and Germany.

    One that closely matches your description is the British Tranter center fire revolver.
    It's a DA/SA revolver, has a rearward opening loading gate, a side-mounted ejector rod, and a firing pin mounted in the frame.
    Caliber was .45.
     
  6. Onty

    Onty Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2003
    Messages:
    187
    Definitely not French 1873 revolver (http://www.amc-antiquites.com/00irevfrus.html ), nor one of Italian revolvers (http://www.gunsamerica.com/2203/2203-random-1.htm ).

    I lmost forgot: it had fluted cylinder.

    Dfariswheel, the funny thing is that I already thought, I don’t know why, that this could be Tranter. However, any Tranter revolver (pictures) I had see does not reassemble my “mystery” revolver. Would you please, have a picture or the link of that Tranter revolver that you think might fit description.

    Thanks!
     
  7. Sunray

    Sunray Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2003
    Messages:
    10,803
    Location:
    London, Ont.
  8. Onty

    Onty Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2003
    Messages:
    187
    Thanks Sunray, this Tranter 1878 looks closer than anything else I had seen so far, except “mystery” revolver has a pin style front sight. Has this 1878 model frame mounted firing pin?

    Also, looks to me that the cylinder pin head could be predecessor of famous Keith No. 5 style pin.

    P.S. I just sent you PM.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page