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ups and downs of Wylde chamber?

Discussion in 'Competition Shooting' started by Fatelvis, Nov 29, 2003.

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  1. Fatelvis

    Fatelvis Member

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    When is a Wylde chamber desirable, and how is it different from a 5.56 or 223 chamber? Thanx-
     
  2. SRM

    SRM Member

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    The wylde chamber was designed by Bill Wylde as an ultra-reliable match chamber. It utilizes a standard .223 body chamber with a difference in the neck IIRC. It is commonly used by several custom smiths to provide enhanced accuracy and reliability for service rifle competition.

    HTH....SRM
     
  3. Swampy

    Swampy Member

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    Supposedly the Rock River DCM legal AR has the Wylde, too.

    As far as reliability goes.... it seems to work.

    Best to all,
    Swampy
     
  4. SRM

    SRM Member

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    And Bill Wylde's response

    Posted By: Bill Wylde
    Date: Thursday, 13 November 2003, at 8:46 a.m.

    In Response To: Re: .223 Wylde

    The case dimensions of the Wylde reamer are that of one of the NATO prints. Not a thing tight about it. As I recall, there were two NATO prints in use. I don't recall the print number used, but do have it in old records somewhere.

    Throating was about the only change. The decision was made to make the freebore diameter .2240" as a good bullet seal. That done, excess freebore made little difference to accuracy. One of the reasons the magazine length 69's shot so well in the chamber. It so happened that the 80 grain Sierra seated to the lands was about ideal at .2470" OAL. Simple luck.....All of it.

    The initial reamer(designed in 1984)was mainly geared toward Canadian 5.56 ball, as I was experimenting with their issue ball for competitive purposes. This operation was slow in getting off the ground, and really didn't start happening until about 1990. The use of 5.56 NATO ball in Canada was a short lived affair. Handloads were allowed in about 1994.

    Just prior to this time the AR's were gaining great strength in the U.S. The military finally got involved. The rest is history.

    You might ask how the the 62 grain 5.56 ball worked for Canadian LR prone shooting to 1,000 yds? It was supersonic in barrels of 28", and longer. It also was very competitive with the 147 grain 7.62 ball in use there at the time. The wind drift differential at long range (7.62/5.56) was about 15% in favor of the 7.62.

    Those days were very interesting.
     
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