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Using an old non-working refrigerator to store powder

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by gsc3zny, Aug 12, 2013.

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  1. gsc3zny

    gsc3zny Member

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    I have a refrigerator that doesn't work anymore and I want to use it to store powder. Do I have anything to worry about specifically? I was just thinking of getting some moisture absorber that may help
     
  2. DMH

    DMH Member

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    I would do some research. I think with powder stored in its proper containers moisture is not an issue. However venting the refrigerator is of concern. I believe you do not want your powders stored in an air tight box. In the event of a powder burn you want the pressure to escape.

    DMH
     
  3. steve4102

    steve4102 Member

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    Without proper venting you would be creating a Bomb.
     
  4. Field Tester

    Field Tester Member

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    I've only seen them converted a bit and used as safes. Pretty cool actually. Hidden lock and a burglar would walk right past one in a garage and think nothing else of it. If you go that route make sure the seals are good (cheap as heck to replace anyways) and make sure to keep some kind of desiccant inside.
     
  5. dab102999

    dab102999 Member

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    I have some powder around from when I started in the 80's. I have some powder left from my great uncle from the 50's still in original keg. Proper containers will keep powder for long time.
     
  6. Crashbox
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    Crashbox Member

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    I use one. When I started this incredibly addicting hobby there just happened to be an old fridge in the same room. I do have some desiccant packs inside as well but depending on the environment they may not really be necessary, my basement is bone-dry.

    As long as you use a post-1958 refrigerator with the continuous magnetic door seal such as was mandated then (due to numerous child deaths with latching doors), any pressure buildup should easily be relieved by overcoming the seal.
     
  7. Catpop

    Catpop Member

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    Old sawmill trick. sawmill shops have been using old refrigerators for years to keep welding rods dry. Some went as far as to install a 100 watt light bulb in them to lower humidity even more.:cool:
    Good point made on ability to vent itself.
     
  8. joe88xj

    joe88xj member

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    thats pretty cool, I will have to research this some more!
     
  9. gsc3zny

    gsc3zny Member

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    Maybe I will drill some holes in the side, or bottom
     
  10. higgite

    higgite Member

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    Or cut some sections out of the door seal.
     
  11. beatledog7

    beatledog7 Member

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    I agree with post #6. Unless you put a lock on the door, I don't see how pressure would be a concern. How hard is it to pull open a fridge door? Why would it not just open to release pressure?
     
  12. HOWARD J

    HOWARD J Member

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    I had powder stored in my garage about 30 years---super hot in summer--very cold in winter---none of it ever went bad just sitting on a shelf in original container
     
  13. 243winxb

    243winxb Member

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    If door is held closed by properties of magnetism, i would not vent it. Not a bomb, unless the door has a mechanical lock of some sort.
     
  14. Mal H

    Mal H Administrator

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    Right - all the worries about creating a bomb out of an old fridge are a bit over the top. Even if it had a mechanical closure, you could simply make it inoperable (always unlatched), and tilt the fridge just a bit toward the back so the door will stay shut due to gravity.
     
  15. dagger dog

    dagger dog Member

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    Get a Golden Rod or Gunslick Gunsaver mount it at the bottom of the old frige that will keep the interior moisture free.
     
  16. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    Obviously I have not run any experiments to determine just how big of a blast you can get with gunpowder in a refrigerator. However I have seen demonstrations on how blasts are magnified even inside flimsy wood frame buildings.

    I am of the opinion that you want to store massive quantities of gunpowder in something that is easily frangible. Like a cardboard box. A refrigerator, even an unlocked refrigerator, is a surprisingly strong box. If your gunpowder auto combusts you want the pressure wave to vent against as little resistance as possible.

    Old gunpowder will auto combust. I don’t know how much red nitric acid gas fuming you need before auto combustion, but the stuff will auto combust.
     
  17. higgite

    higgite Member

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