Utmost respect

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by 351 WINCHESTER, Jan 27, 2014.

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  1. 351 WINCHESTER

    351 WINCHESTER Member

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    Having spend this afternoon shooting my new 1858 and cleaning said revolver I have a new found respect for our country men and women who had to deal with all of the issues of loading, shooting, cleaning, reloading and maintaince.

    I shot 5 cylinders of 6 ea. totaling 30 shots without a single misfire (once I found my Pietta likes cci no. 10 caps. No. 11's fell off.

    My load was stout. I started with 35 grs. 3f 777 and settled on 45 grs 3f 777.

    I just finished cleaning the beast and it is now loaded and capped and is resting next to me.

    If I lived back in the civil war days and I had the money I would have 2 or 3 of these horse pistols and I for the life of me don't know how they were maintained after a battle under low light conditions at best while trying to cook some bacon and beans and then trying to get some sleep.

    I like the gun, but it's not going to replace my glock or my 1911 rest assured, but it has a place in my collection for sure.
     
  2. J-Bar

    J-Bar Member

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    Old technology can be good technology.

    Welcome to the legion of soot lords...those who love percussion revolvers!
     
  3. jgh4445

    jgh4445 Member

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    I can hear the guys at the camp in the old days now..."Boy I sure find it a lot easier to clean these cylinders than to fool with that old front stuffin flintlock. Sure do have a lot of respect for them though."
     
  4. BowerR64

    BowerR64 Member

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    wow i thought the 30 grain pyrodex pellets were pretty stiff i cant imagine 45 grains of 3F T7 :what:

    That was with a ball?
     
  5. 351 WINCHESTER

    351 WINCHESTER Member

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    I know 45 grs. sounds like a lot, but the recoil in that horse pistol is nothing. It was loaded with round balls. I emptied her at dark and it was impressive.
     
  6. damoc

    damoc Member

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    ROFL
     
  7. damoc

    damoc Member

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    351

    I dont think they need or got as much attention as we give them now

    oh and wow 45 grains is pretty stiff did you leave any rifleing on the balls?
     
  8. 351 WINCHESTER

    351 WINCHESTER Member

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    LOL. I'm starting to think the powder measure I got from Cabelas is not right. I will check it tomorrow. I know I loaded my ruger with 45 grs. 3f 777 and it just left enough space to seat a rb.
    I also tried 50 grs. in the 58, but really had a hard time seating the ball.
     
  9. Packman

    Packman Member

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    I routinely shoot 45 grains of pyrodex FFg and I don't think of it as a stout load. Enough kick to be kinda fun, but nothing major. I could shoot it one handed with no issue. I do have the 8 inch barrel though, maybe that helps?
     
  10. Fingers McGee

    Fingers McGee Member

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    .45 gr fffg T7 charge would be equivalent to a 53 grain charge of fffg BP. That's one heavy charge in a Remington.
     
  11. Phantom Captain

    Phantom Captain Member

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    Just to clarify, it's not a horse pistol. The horse pistols would be the Walker and Dragoon models. They were called such because they were too big and heavy to wear all day on your belt in a holster, as such they were carried on the horse saddle.

    Your 1858 is a belt pistol, like the 1851 Navy, 1860 Army and so on.
     
  12. Milamber

    Milamber Member

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    LOL I came to the same conclusion when I bought one. Especially when the caps jammed the cylinder. But as has been said compared to what came before a real step forward. A bit like cable brakes versus hydraulic brakes!
     
  13. HiWayMan

    HiWayMan Member

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    Don't tell that to Captain Gus McCrae.
     
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