Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Value for $money$

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Puncha, Sep 13, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Puncha

    Puncha Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2003
    Messages:
    229
    Location:
    South East Asia
    Good Day Fellas,

    I'm looking to buy my first serious firearm (and it might be my only firearm from now on since I sold a beat-up snubby when I got laid off last year) and I've decided that it will be a revolver chambered in either .357 Magnum or .38 Special rated for +P ammo.

    The problem is that I don't live in the US and the only two gunshops in my country do not keep any revolvers in their inventory. In other words, if you want a wheelgun, they're going to have to special order it in for you and with that comes the midddleman fees, customs clearance, govt licensing fees...that will jack up the stateside MSRP by at least 20%. :uhoh:

    I guess the issue here is that I want you guys to give me a model and maker recommendation that will be value for money. I'm looking at:

    1)medium frame revolver with a 4" barrel
    2)6-shot capacity
    3)ability to accept a lifetime of cheap +P .38 special LRN ammo
    4)preferably stainless steel
    5)decent grips
    6)adjustable sights (may accept fixed sights if price is right)
    7)tough and stone cold reliable (civilian gunsmiths here charge an arm and a leg)
    8)Able to keep a 5.5" grouping at 25 meters when shot offhand single action by your average shooter.

    I've considered the following models:
    a) Ruger GP-100 .357 Mag stainless with 4" barrel
    b) Taurus tracker .357 mag with 4" barrel in stainless steel
    c) S&W Model 67 .38 Special +P
    d) S&W Model 619 .357 Magnum

    The ruger is looking kinda attractive because is cheaper than the S&Ws and has a tough as nails reputation that Taurus does not have.

    Any advice on what I should get to maximise my funds?
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2005
  2. pauli

    pauli Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    Messages:
    1,458
    Location:
    herndon, va, usa
    the average shooter can't keep a 4.5" group at 10 yards, much less 25.

    is there any sort of used gun market available to you?
     
  3. MrTuffPaws

    MrTuffPaws Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Messages:
    1,511
    Location:
    Az
    I personally own the Taurus tracker .357 mag with 4" barrel in stainless steel.

    1)medium frame revolver with a 4" barrel

    Got that covered except that it also has factory porting.

    2)6-shot capacity

    7 shot.

    3)ability to accept a lifetime of cheap +P .38 special LRN ammo

    No issues here

    4)preferably stainless steel

    A nice matte finish.

    5)decent grips

    Some love the ribber grips, and some hate them. They are a bit small for me, so I got a Hogue replacment which is still a tad too small.

    6)adjustable sights (may accept fixed sights if price is right)

    Yep

    7)tough and stone cold reliable (civilian gunsmiths here charge an arm and a leg)

    Yep, same here too. I was able to change the springs without any trouble.

    8)Able to keep a 4.5" grouping at 25 meters when shot offhand by your average shooter.

    Honestly, I can't shoot that well, but from a rest I can put all seven in a ragged hole at 10 yards.
     
  4. trickyasafox

    trickyasafox Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2004
    Messages:
    2,523
    Location:
    upstate NY go to school in WNY
    i feel like you described a ruger gp 100
     
  5. Boarhunter

    Boarhunter Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    341
    Location:
    Huntsville, Alabama
    Puncha,

    All of the alternatives you are considering are good sound firearms that will not disappoint, but for value and guaranteed longevity, it is just hard to beat the Ruger. It is built like a bank vault and should last many lifetimes....

    Boarhunter
     
  6. Frandy

    Frandy Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,354
    Location:
    NC
    I agree that you listed winners - each and every one. My choice is the 4" stainless GP-100.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Puncha

    Puncha Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2003
    Messages:
    229
    Location:
    South East Asia
    Pauli:

    I've amended my post if the standards seem too high but I've only started formal revolver lessons recently and have untill now fired less than 400 .38 Special 158gr +P LRNs. Shooting offhand at 25 meters using single action only, I have been able to land about 60% of my shots within a 5.5" radius of the 10 ring. The rental gun that is use is a beat up M67 S&W but I hope to get better in the months ahead.

    Regarding used revos....yes there is a market but it is very limited as only the old timers among the shooting community own revolvers. Buying 2nd hand would thus entail 10-30 year old medium frame S&Ws with a minimum of about 8000 rounds fired through them.... I much prefer a brand new specimen as it will be my primary piece for a long time to come.
     
  8. 461

    461 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2003
    Messages:
    1,133
    Location:
    NE.
    The GP-100 fits your request perfectly. Although opinions are like "elbows" as everyone has one, the GP-100 offers everything you've mentioned you're looking for. The Ruger will last a lifetime plus especially under the light loads you're looking at.
     
  9. charby

    charby Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    Messages:
    562
    Location:
    Middle of IO-WAY
    +1 for GP100, I have one and its far more accurate than I can be.

    But there isn't anything wrong with the smiths or taurus. I think the GP-100 will be easy to work on since you mentioned there is only 2 gun shops close by. It has less parts and many of the ones that might break can be mail ordered and replaced easily.

    Charby
     
  10. steveracer

    steveracer Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,554
    Location:
    VA Beach
    Gp-100

    Maybe the best value for revolver in the history of great values for revolvers. You will not be able to shoot it loose in your lifetime with .38 spec+p loads. No way, never. Your grandkids might, but you won't.
    Mine was used, in near new condition, for $335 out the door. I have kept a round count on all my other guns, even a log for my rifles, but the with the GP, I have no idea. I asked my friend, a long-time Ruger DA shooter, and he said, simply, "You can't afford to outshoot that gun. You don't reload, and you're not a millionaire."
    I find it shoots heavy 180 grain magnum loads VERY well, with 158 grain loads coming in a close second. 38 Special rounds shoot fine out of it, and the recoil is negligable.
    Best,
    Steve.
     
  11. Puncha

    Puncha Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2003
    Messages:
    229
    Location:
    South East Asia
    I see that Rossi revos are quite economical. Is it a good idea to buy one in .357 mag? It will save me a large chunk of change. :confused:
     
  12. Boarhunter

    Boarhunter Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    341
    Location:
    Huntsville, Alabama
    Puncha,

    Rossi revolvers are probably good for some purposes, but they are not even in the same ballpark as the others being suggested here. You may save a bit of money up front, but I believe you will shortchange yourself big-time over the long haul if you buy a Rossi.

    There will be no regrets with the Ruger; my guess is that you would quickly regret the purchase of the Rossi, your circumstances considered.

    Boarhunter
     
  13. TheEgg

    TheEgg Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    1,363
    GP100 or S&W 686.
     
  14. Marshall

    Marshall Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    5,569
    Location:
    Oklahoma, Green Country
  15. Moonclip

    Moonclip Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Messages:
    2,766
    Location:
    USA
    GP100, Taurus or Rossi might be serviceable, but you are more likely to have a problem with them than with a Ruger. In your case where it will be your only revolver and you will be shooting it for a lifetime, Ruger is the best choice.
     
  16. Berg01

    Berg01 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2003
    Messages:
    712
    Your criteria #3 - ability to accept a lifetime of cheap +P .38 special LRN ammo IMHO would argue for choice "c" S&W Model 67 .38 Special +P. I don't like to shoot a lot of 38 spl LRN in a .357 Magnum, because you get burn rings which crud up the charge holes in the front of the cylinder. If you were shooting jacketed .38 spl., I wouldn't have a problem with most any of your choices. And that M67 is a total tack driver with that type of ammo, one of the most overlooked and underrated wheelguns you will find.
     
  17. waterhouse

    waterhouse Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Messages:
    4,238
    Location:
    Round Rock, TX
    I went through the same decision process last month, except I wanted a 3" with fixed sites . . .

    I ended up with a gp-100 and I'm very fond of it already.
     
  18. sfhogman

    sfhogman Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2004
    Messages:
    559
    Location:
    San Francisco Ca
    Another vote for the GP100. If something were to go bump in the night, that's the gun I'd reach for. Smiths are excellent as well, but I believe the Ruger is the best value for your hard-earned money.

    Jeff
     
  19. Cortland

    Cortland Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2003
    Messages:
    902
    Location:
    Carrollton, VA
    Good Lord man, don't keep us in suspense. What country are you in, already?

    My vote's for the GP-100.
     
  20. Jet22

    Jet22 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2005
    Messages:
    202
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    I'm a S&W man all the way. With that said, I would vote for the GP-100 in your case. Why?? As one of the other posters said, "unbreakable" :cool:
     
  21. Dienekes

    Dienekes Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    1,905
    Location:
    Wyoming
    I would tend to think the GP-100 for extreme long term durability...but it is one big, heavy gun and the reason why mine doesn't get out much. The M67 is a very, very nice gun also and a lot handier. The Ruger will probably go for three normal lifetimes whereas the M67 may need a trip to the factory in as little as, say, 50 years if shot often.
     
  22. tomkatz

    tomkatz Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    842
    Location:
    auburn washington
    For a low cost revolver, the GP100 is unbeatable.....I just recently picked one up and it is an excellent gun for the money, which in my case was well under $300.00.......tom

    [​IMG]
     
  23. Puncha

    Puncha Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2003
    Messages:
    229
    Location:
    South East Asia
    All opinions duly noted gentlemen!

    Next month, when I have enough funds, I shall approach the local pistol merchant and get him to quote me the price on a stainless steel GP100. :)

    Of course, if any futher opinions are forthcoming, I shall still welcome them.
     
  24. Ala Dan

    Ala Dan Member in memoriam

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    12,879
    Location:
    Home Of The First Capitol Of The Confederate State
    Other good choices:

    Used Market: Ruger Security-Six (forerunner to the GP-100) as it has
    adjustable sights as well. Or, the fixed sighted S&W model 10.
    However, in the S&W model 10 .38 Special, I would look for a bull
    barrel version. Neither should cost you an arm or a leg! :uhoh: :D
     
  25. BluesBear

    BluesBear member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,672
    Location:
    The Great Pacific NorthWet
    Being a die hard Colt and older S&W man I too think the Ruger best suits your criteria.

    You will NOT wear out the Ruger. At 8,000 rounds it would be just getting broken in.
    Grips, speedloaders, holsters and other accessories are readily available from almost everywhere.
    It may cost you more initially but it will be very cost effective in the long run.
    You'll never be sorry you bought it.


    The Taurus is in second place. It would depend on which country you are in as to getting it serviced.
    The good thing if you decie on the Taurus is that they are basically a S&W action so the good gunsmiths in your country probably already know how to work on them. They are very simple and you can even learn to do your own work.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page