Warrior mindset?

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics, and Training' started by B yond, Jun 4, 2010.

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  1. Shadow 7D

    Shadow 7D Member

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    9
    Wish you used the mantra
    but more for me, actually think I found my sig line

    Anywho
    A great and brave warrior
    who is fearless to die, doesn't make a great soldier, see they die, bravely

    rather take a Bushido type approach, accept that you are dead, then act fearlessly to survive, it's much more complex, and is a new thinking process, definitaly not taught in public school. read up on ooda loop and violence of action
     
  2. B yond

    B yond Member

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    OP here, just trying to clarify what I was thinking of as a "warrior mindset."

    I was thinking of the unwaivering will to complete the task at hand despite physical limitations and injuries. Examples include combatants continuing to attempt to neutralize the threat despite being seriously injured, small women who move immense objects that they would not normally be able to budge to save their children, the man who cut his own hand off with a pocket knife to free himself from a fallen boulder, and heroes who just keep digging through the rubble looking for survivors when most people would have dropped from exhaustion.

    Maybe "warrior mindset" wasn't the correct term. I wasn't referring to people who foolishly charge into battle with excessive machoism and get their heads perforated. I didn't intend to inquire about people who refuse to lose a fist fight because it would damage their egos.

    I'm curious about the mindset that allows people to take extreme amounts of physical damage and keep going until the task at hand is complete. The mindset that lets people ignore their own normal physical limitations and do what needs to be done without regard to the impact on their own bodies.

    'Warrior mindset' may not be the right term for it as it does not always involve combat or violence.

    Thank you all for your input thus far. Some very good reads.
     
  3. MachIVshooter
    • Contributing Member

    MachIVshooter Contributing Member

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    I don't think you can compare people to cats in this regard. They're much tougher (and pound for pound, one helluva lot stronger) than we are.

    A 10 pound cat can fall from 20+ feet, land right side up, and scurry off with no injury. Fully grown humans have died from falls no greater than their own height. I've also witnessed cats shot in the head at point blank range run off at nearly the speed of the bullet that hit them (obvious embelllishment on their speed, yes). They also almost never get sick, and very rarely get infections from wounds (when they do, it seldom amounts to more than a local absess).
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2010
  4. Shadow 7D

    Shadow 7D Member

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    it's something you train, or it's something you do
    the first takes practice,
    the second takes surprise

    Most of the time, like what many people who do extraordinary things
    those who do the "heroic" act, are pretty passive about it
     
  5. kgpcr

    kgpcr Member

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    You will never know if you have the mind and will of a Warrior untill you have been tested and past the test. To sit here and say i have it is foolish unless you have passed the test and all those i know who have it would not brag about it.
     
  6. rbohm

    rbohm Member

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    :cool:the true warrior mindset is one that allows you to avoid a fight if possible, but if not possible, to do your best to win the fight, and if you lose, to try and stay alive to fight another day if needed, and if you are dieing, you die with honor and accept your ultimate fate.
     
  7. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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  8. Shadow 7D

    Shadow 7D Member

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    I forget which famous WWII general it was, but to paraphrase
    Sun Tzu viewed the battlefield as an extension of the negotiating table, and the consequence of failed diplomacy, and honestly don't think much has changed in the last 4000? years
     
  9. rbohm

    rbohm Member

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    i might have to look for that book, but i learned my view from sun tzu's the art of war.
     
  10. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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    but i learned my view from sun tzu's the art of war

    Sun Tsu is a fine teacher to follow, if you're at war. Are you at war?

    There are at least as many views as there are teachers, and probably more... ;)

    lpl
     
  11. rbohm

    rbohm Member

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    sun tzu's tactics work under all conditions, even in the business world. any potential confrontation requires that you consider what tactics you will use if said confrontation chances to come about.
     
  12. navyretired 1

    navyretired 1 Member

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    A warrior mindset doesn't mean stupid, warriors know how to retreat to fight another day when the odds are not favorable.
    The ability to overcome the tendancy to freeze when violence comfronts is the true test of a warrior. Breaking out of that frozen state to take action is the differance. The key to that ability is training and mindset. My personal reaction to violence is an effect call Tachy-Phsycia (spelling) but the effect is time slowing down. I also have the famous red tinted vision almost like red screen across your eyes.
    That time shift allows me what seems to be extra time to react.
     
  13. Old Guy

    Old Guy Member

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    No thought

     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2010
  14. B yond

    B yond Member

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    What?
     
  15. Shadow 7D

    Shadow 7D Member

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    YES YOU CAN TRAIN FOR IT

    Listen, look at most military schools, they train guys for things that are "extreme" like jumping out of a plane, you do and can train, as a matter of fact, that last line,

    the not sure tells me that your initial reaction time will be slow, because you will be lost trying to figure out what is happening.
     
  16. DataMonkey

    DataMonkey Member

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    Post 31 by rbohm is spot on.

    I volunteer with the local PD. We have a ton of statements/reports where potential victims did not become victims, particularly of rape and robbery, by displaying self-confidence and assertiveness. Could they have been victims? Absolutely...but their mindset asserted to the thug they would not be taken lightly. Some reports indicated it was a matter of saying "Hi" and looking them dead in the eyes. Some victims, robbery in particular, bluffed reaching for a firearm (which they didn't actually have).

    Mindset is vital to survival.
     
  17. leadcounsel

    leadcounsel member

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    Good topic - but I'll add that many with a 'warrior mindset' and lots of training often get to demonstrate their training and abilities on a regular basis, but are never really 'tested' to the 'fabeled' extremes like being shot 10 times and fighting back, etc.

    I will say that if you want a current example of the true Warrior Mindset, look no further than the Wounded Warriors of current conflicts - men and women that have suffered the terrible injuries that would have led to certain death a few decades ago such as 1st degree burns on most of their body, loss of limbs, and horrific injuries. These living men and women have overcome obstacles of our nightmares and are amazing. I know because I've met several and am astonished by their stories of pain, survival, recovery, and success.
     
  18. rbohm

    rbohm Member

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    excellent post leadcouncel; i will add one more item to the warrior mindset, and that is the ability to calm yourself in an emergency situation. you dont have to be under threat of attack to put this to use. for instance lets say you are working late into the evening, or early in the morning, and one of your co-workers or customers suddenly falls ill, with say a stroke or heart attack. in most situations the average person tends to panic. yes they call 911, but they are at a loss of what to do after that, and they are usually too panicked to listen to the 911 operator, and they dont think clearly. having worked in the hotel industry for over 25 years, and having faced many emergency situations, i have learned to control my emotions, and render what aid i could at the moment, including working to keep the patient as calm as possible. there is plenty of time to panic and cry when the professionals arrive and take control of the situation.
     
  19. strambo

    strambo Member

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    Very true, and the best antidote to this is experience dealing with high stress situations. But...what if it is your first, and only, life or death situation, how do get the prior experience not to screw it up? You manufacture the prior experience with realistic training like force on force firearms training, etc.

    Another great technique is what LTC Grossman terms "combat breathing" which works via the connection between our breathing rate and our heart rate (which is connected to our height of arousal). Inhale through the nose for a count of 4, hold for a 4 count, exhale through the mouth for a count of four. One time is often enough to work, or do it again. This should get things under control enough to dial 911, make a hard shot, think of what to say/do next.

    (Interestingly, simply dialing 911 can be difficult to impossible for someone under an adrenal dump. Remember fine motor skills go out the window under stress, I've read accounts of people dialing "119" repeatedly or being to fat fingered to hit the right buttons).

    A good training scenario would take, say, a self defense shooting all the way through dialing 911, thinking and mimicking pushing "send" on your cell, then have the trainer role-play the 911 operator. This will give them practice relating concise info to the operator under stress as well as practicing not saying too much, plus the physical practice of dialing 911 under a state of arousal. I guess you could take the battery out as well and punch all the #s plus "send".

    If you want someone to perform a task under stress, they have to physically do it (not just "think" about or discuss doing it) in training. Make them (yourself) keep fighting after being hit. Make yourself move. Make yourself scan. Make yourself, keep engaging until they go down/are no longer a threat (or if you run out of ammo and they are still a threat, disengage, transition to another weapon or close and go H2H). Make yourself move to cover, dial 911, talk to the operator. "Combat breathe" to compose yourself as needed.
     
  20. easyg

    easyg Member

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    I really dislike the term "warrior mindset".

    Sure,there are very intelligent people who have a warrior mindset, but there are also very stupid people who have a warrior mindset.
    And sure, there are some very educated warriors in this world, but there are even more very uneducated warriors in this world.

    Having a warrior mindset MIGHT help a man cope with the task of waging war on his enemies.
    But other than that, I can't say that it's all that useful.


    I do think that the "will to survive" has a great impact on how a person fares in a survival situation.
    But the will to survive really has nothing whatsoever to do with a warrior mindset.
     
  21. rbohm

    rbohm Member

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    easyg, as i stated before, the warrior mindset does have applications outside a fight for life and death. in business for instance you need to have that mindset to handle many situations that inevitably pop up. it doesnt matter if you are doing battle with a weapon or a pen, everything is a fight in one form or another. sun tzu knew this, and the most successful business men know this, as do successful politicians. the warrior mindset allows you to take advantage of your opponents mistakes, it allows you to see your opponents weaknesses, as well as your own weaknesses.
     
  22. Shadow 7D

    Shadow 7D Member

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    In the medical practices (emergency EMT military etc.)

    There is a saying, 'check your own pulse before you check the patients'
    much the same could be said here, it is a cultured mindset developed and ready TO THINK THROUGH A SITUATION

    And the readiness to act as needed
     
  23. shockwave

    shockwave Member

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    Because the original question in this thread did not seem to involve the "Warrior Mindset," I didn't have anything to say about it. But now I see that the question of what a warrior mindset actually is has come under discussion.

    Three classic works are the Art of War (Sun Tzu), The Book of Five Rings (Musashi), and The Hagakure (Tsunetomo), all of which address mindset among other things.

    As I grasp it, the mindset of the warrior involves winning the battle before it starts. That may not be possible. But if it is possible, the warrior will win because of his preparation. The texts mentioned above discuss this explicitly, each in their own way, detailing training, strategy and tactics. The warrior trains with his weapons and maintains them assiduously (whether that weapon is a gun, a sword, or any tool of his craft).

    To the extent that the environment can be made favorable, the warrior chooses winning ground. For example, you know those pedestrian overpasses that cross freeways? Usually they are a long cage with a stairway on each end? A warrior would not willingly enter such a structure. The term "aji," which in this sense means "latent potential" means that a warrior jealously guards his options.

    Training is how one develops faster and more accurate reflexes than the enemy's. Faster, stronger, better technique, tricks and feints, whatever tilts the playing to one's advantage.

    In these kinds of ways, it should be apparent that the Warrior Mindset permeates all aspects of one's existence: You are either preparing and training, or you aren't.

    As an example, if you train in H2H combat for one-on-many, as the defender a good strategy is to avoid letting the enemies encircle you. Here is an actual case of how this works. In training, sometimes you get to play the attacker - you're one of the group of enemies. What you discover is that as you try to get to the defender, it's very difficult. He's spinning around, weaving, and doesn't give you a good opportunity to get at him and exploit your numeric advantage.

    If you're a BG, you should have the same feeling when you try to attack a warrior. He's never in a vulnerable position. He turns out to be armed. He is faster and more accurate. In all ways, you will feel as if you have been outmatched and outmaneuvered even before you start. This applies to fighting, business, and all types of conflict and competition.
     
  24. easyg

    easyg Member

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    I have to disagree.
    What you're trying to attribute to those who have a warrior mindset is knowledge, skill, and ability that any smart person would have, even those without a warrior mindset.
    There are plenty of folks who have a warrior mindset yet they still fail miserably at capitalizing on the mistakes of their enemy, or finding their enemy's weakness.
    Just having a warrior mindset will not make one any more successful than a person who does not have a warrior mindset.
    Smart people generally succeed and stupid people generally fail, regardless of their mindset.

    Having a warrior mindset does not inherently instill the ability to take advantage of an opponent's mistakes or see an opponent's weaknesses, or even see one's own weaknesses.
    And one does not need to have a warrior mindset in order to do those things....one just needs to be smarter than their opponent, warrior mindset or not.

    A warrior mindset is nothing more than the mindset of "Us vs Them".
    Such mindsets can actually be a severe handicap when trying to function in non-war environment or a non-competitive environment.
    Not everything is a competition.
    For business A to succeed does not necessarily mean that business B must fail.

    Being trapped in a survival situation, along with someone else who happens to have a warrior mindset, would probably not be a good thing.
    Those with the warrior mindset, or the "US vs Them" mindset, often can't function well outside of their own little circle of trusted comrades.
     
  25. mbt2001

    mbt2001 Member

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    The founder of Aikido, Morihei Ueshiba, had studied several martial arts, judo, Aiki-jujitsu, kenjutsu, Yagyū Shingan-ryū. Mastering some and studying several more. His life was spent pursuing TRUE BUDO.

    One day, practicing his forms alone, his mind suddenly went blank. Literally everything he had ever been taught was gone. He tried to remember what to do next, failed. He just stood there. His mind raced, in a virtual panic he forced himself to be calm. It came, slowly, and with it, the way. He understood now. There was no winner or loser, only superior purpose, clarity of thought, certainty of movement. Aikido, the way of harmony.

    The sword of war is converted by the great warriors from a sword of death to a sword of peace. I learn to fight, to protect others, not to harm them. One of my instructors used to say that in every encounter, you seek to resolve conflict by moving to stillness. Conviction, focus, clarity, these are the characteristics of your spirit.

    You must also be aware of your belly / your center and seek always to maintain it. The Japanese / Chinese believe the focus of Ki is about 2" below the navel. By maintaining, physically, your center, you are allowing the most potent access / expression of your spirit.

    The mind is the next piece. You must train it to be empty. The spirit and the body meet in the mind. The mind should allow a harmonious connection between the two, not a fear induced, panic driven clutter of mess.

    It takes a lifetime to master. While I have met people that were extremely advanced, I suppose I have never met anyone who was a true "master". We all walk the path and that is the point. How can one traveler tell you anything about the road he is walking with you? Perhaps he has been on it longer, but he cannot tell you of the problems encountered on the road today.

    Sorry for sounding like Yoda. I almost kept going!
     
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