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Weapons as tax write off

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by che4rev, Jan 5, 2003.

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  1. che4rev

    che4rev Member

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    I am in the infantry, and cary a pistol for my job. I want to buy an SVI for my own personal enjoyment. Could I write that off as a work expense on my taxes since when I fired it I would be training me to be a better soldier? And if so, could I write off other shooting supplies?
     
  2. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    Sounds reasonable as work related to me. But you may have to depreciate it over a period of time & anything over $400 should be depreciated otherwise the IRS can penalize you. BTW, I write off a gun if it's related to work as well as gunsmithing tools.

    "But honey, I'm doing this for us. After all, we can write it off our taxes."
     
  3. Sisco

    Sisco Member

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    I know farmers are allowed some kind of credit it the gun is used for "predator control".
     
  4. Matthew Courtney

    Matthew Courtney Member

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    Unreimbursed employee business expenses are deductable to the extent that they, combined with most other miscellaneous deductions, exceed 2% of your adjusted gross income and you itemize your deductions. See instructions for form 1040, schedule A and form 2106, or contact your local tax professional for details.
     
  5. Mike Irwin

    Mike Irwin Member

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    Given what I know about deductions like this, I'd say no.

    The miltary provides you with a sidearm, and unless I'm mistaken generally doesn't allow you to carry your own.

    The fact that this would be for personal use, as opposed to business use, is generally the nail in the coffin.

    I'd say if you tried a deduction like this you'd probably really be opening yourself up to an audit.

    If you were REQUIRED to provide your own side arm as a condition of you job, that would likely be a different story.
     
  6. voilsb

    voilsb Member

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    but it would certainly be nice if soldiers could deduct marksmanship expenses
     
  7. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    LE can if it's on the authorized list for personal weapons. Any accountants out there in THR?
     
  8. Dennis

    Dennis Member

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    One legitimate method would be to start a firearms-related school, ie teach classes.

    When I was teaching CHL (CCW) classes, everything related to that business was deducted from revenue I earned from the business. That’s totally legal and proper.

    You must turn a profit for a certain number of years. Does anyone remember what that requirement is? Seems it was something like you must make a profit three years out of each five or the business is considered a hobby and NOTHING is deductible.

    I turned a profit each year and deducted car mileage, office supplies, class supplies, a portion of my phone bill, ammunition used at the range for training myself (as an instructor) and others (as students), etc., etc. I was even able to charge off one Glock pistol which I used ONLY for class-related training—including, of course, qualifying as an instructor (shooting, range fees, license fees, etc.). All perfectly legal and above board.

    Keep good records. Better than that, keep IMPECCABLE records! ;)
     
  9. Mike Irwin

    Mike Irwin Member

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    "One legitimate method would be to start a firearms-related school, ie teach classes."

    Something tells me that Che4rev's current employer might frown on that... :)
     
  10. yorec

    yorec Member

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    Still gotta be a requirement to have for the job. Just cause its on department's approval list won't cut it - ya gotta show that you had to have it...

    Least that what my accountant says.
     
  11. Dennis

    Dennis Member

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    Mike,

    Yeah, I know what you mean! :D

    It rather depends upon the stability of his tour, whether he lives on or off base, what hours he has free, etc. ... :scrutiny:

    Several of the fellows stationed at Kelly AFB (San Antonio, TX circa 1970-1976) did this by forming a skeet club. They had a blast (pun intended) every Saturday, wrote off their expenses, and even made a little money--which, I believe, they promptly spent at the NCO club every Saturday evening after, um, "class". :D :D

    Hmm. Then again, this was a headquarters unit and the skeet club (or rifle range) was as close as we ever came to a "field exercise"!

    Well, they WERE involved with ONE field exercise with the waitress from the Rainbow Lounge.... but that's a different story! :rolleyes:

    HIGH Road, Dennis! Stick to the HIGH Road! :D
     
  12. Kahr carrier

    Kahr carrier Member

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    The IRS SUCKS.:neener:
     
  13. NewShooter78

    NewShooter78 Member

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    I'll be writing off everything I've bought for my security job if I can. Which includes gun, duty belt and accessories, ammo, clothes, lane expenses, etc.
     
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