Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Weighing Powder - Method and Scale

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Andrew Leigh, Apr 24, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    3,383
    Location:
    Piney Woods of East Texas
    The Gempro is very sensitive to level. It has a bubble level at the back for leveling the scales, 4 adj feet. When you level you must have all feet contacting so touching the scale does not tilt it. It comes with a shock pad, to set the scales on. I did not like that when pressing the tare button the scales moved. My scales are on a separate counter that is not impacted by other equipment. It also takes 20 min or so to warm up and stabilize. I use AC only so I just leave it on 24/7 when I thing I'm going to be using it. You have control on the auto power down feature when running on batteries. The instructions also tell you to have the scales in your work location for 24hr for all the parts to get to the same temp. This is true with all precision equipment.

    These scales are more accurate than the std class M2 calibration weights. Meaning that it can detect the deviation std. You have to be careful when setting loads on the pan. It does not like impacts, may shift the zero if you drop the weight on hard. I do not like the pan that ships with it. I had a static problem that the powder did not want to release. I went back to my AL pan, problem solved.

    I have used precision scales in the lab for years. These are very good, being a consumer grade, Not $3000 scales.
     
  2. Potatohead
    • Contributing Member

    Potatohead Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2013
    Messages:
    5,371
    I'd like to know, because Ive always been somewhat enamored with that little thing. I long ago threw out my little electronic Lyman.
     
  3. 1066

    1066 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2013
    Messages:
    169
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2014
  4. Andrew Leigh

    Andrew Leigh Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,033
    Location:
    Johannesburg S.A.
  5. 1066

    1066 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2013
    Messages:
    169
    I think that has fixed it Andrew.
     
  6. Vodoun da Vinci

    Vodoun da Vinci Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2013
    Messages:
    1,685
    Location:
    Illinois
    I use a GemPro 250 as well. When it dies, I'll buy another...fantastic accuracy and easy to use. I thought the scale was wrong until I realized that I have a check weight set that has a 2 gr. weight that is truly .02 gr. off - it always weighs 1.98 grs. Because it *is* 1.98 gr. The other 2 gr. weight weighs 2 gr. always.

    I hand load .32 acp and I am finicky and extremely accurate. I use Unique powder and weigh every charge because I have found that .1 gr in the .32 will change the velocity almost 100 fps! My GemPro is accurate and consistent. Highly recommended. When it says a charge is 4.7 gr. the charge is 4.7 +/- .02 grains.

    Every time - all the time.

    VooDoo
     
  7. lauderdale
    • Contributing Member

    lauderdale Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    745
    Location:
    TN.
    GEM-PRO 250 +1 I leave it on, but I reload almost every day. In the dog day's down TENN. it gets tricky with air cond. That means early in the day before things get hot!
     
  8. Vodoun da Vinci

    Vodoun da Vinci Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2013
    Messages:
    1,685
    Location:
    Illinois
    A couple people have asked/intimated that they'd like to know why some folks have such a high opinion of the GemPro 250 while others say it is a problem child. I have had no problems with mine *but* I am a technician professionally and have some very precise and finicky habits when loading and weighing.

    Some folks are shocked/upset when they discover that a scale capable of .02 grain accuracy is susceptible to air currents. The tech in me is shocked that folks think it's done by magic. Why wouldn't a precision instrument be susceptible to weight changes caused by air which is a moving fluid? Duh...

    Same with other technical/geeky aspects. Some folks have "fat thumbs" and cannot operate micrometers and scales and fine instruments of measure and when things go South on them they blame the tool. Some folks think powder drops of .1 gr. are close enough...I gasp in exasperation if I check loads and they are 4.84 or 4.76 when the goal was 4.8 gr. And if it takes me an hour of warming up the room/scale, leveling, turning off the fan or air handling and making sure folks don't stomp around or slam doors while I'm loading I'm cool with that to get that level of accuracy and get the most out of the machine. Others do not have that mindset and are not gonna turn off the furnace to stop the air from moving while they weigh ecery charge of 100.

    They have to be calibrated and they have to be used within the parameters of their inherent accuracy and some folks cannot operate within that level of fine-ness and dot every I and cross every T so, they have problems. And they blame the machine. They have to be level (not "kinda level") and they have to be warm and they have to be treated like precision instruments in a proper atmosphere which many reloading shops *are not* atmospheres for finicky sensitive instruments like electronic scales. It requires a bit of finickyness and attention to handling and preparation that many find to be un necessary or needlessly tedious.

    I'm sure a certain number of them (the scales) get beat up in shipping or have componets that have been subjected to temp and humidity extremes and been compromised as well. Or stored where it is extreme, or dropped/roughly handled, mis calibrated or tested with check weights that have been handled with sticky fingers (I always use tweezers) and stuff like that.

    Some folks just have problems and it's almost always those who speak up. Folks who buy them and get on fine and love 'em usually just ....use 'em and keep quiet.

    VooDoo
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2014
  9. loose noose

    loose noose Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2012
    Messages:
    2,826
    Location:
    Southern Nevada
    I depend mostly on my Redding Beam Scale, which I keep zeroed in directly above my reloading bench on a shelf at eye level. For a back-up I use my Lyman Micro electronic scale, which also has to be left on for accurate measurements. I've been using the Redding for over 40 years w/o any problems, even approaching maximum loads. The Lyman so far has been very accurate also, however, I've only used it about a year. Again the Lyman has to be turned on for at least 10 minutes before it will give accurate consistent powder drops. I also use my Uniflow powder measure.

    Any time I'm reloading rifle shells using stick powder, I use my trickle as even my RCBS Unilow will cut some of the grains, that also goes for pistol rounds approaching maximum loadings.
     
  10. deadeye dick

    deadeye dick Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Messages:
    323
    Location:
    Easley S.C.
    On my Lee beam I find that if I don't center the powder in the pan I will get a different reading. If it's off to one side it will usually weigh heavy. Any one have this problem?
     
  11. Potatohead
    • Contributing Member

    Potatohead Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2013
    Messages:
    5,371
    Thanks voodoo
     
  12. dsm

    dsm Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    Messages:
    285
    Throw light on Harrells powder measure and trickle up on a A&D FX-120i using a Omega electric trickler.

    [YouTube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KSpB8sW7iM[/YouTube]
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page