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well guys i am working on buyin a marlin 60 22 rifle so do ya'll like yours??

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by midland man, May 15, 2019 at 7:43 PM.

  1. midland man

    midland man Member

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    yep its been over twenty years ago since I bought one of these and like a dummy I traded it off for something else so this time I went in to Walmart and did my 4473 so waiting on the delayed crap to get past me! oh well so while waiting guys please tell me about your marlin model 60 22 rifles??
     
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  2. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    I love the 60. It’s the world’s highest selling rifle for a reason. It might not carry with it all of the aftermarket trappings and tricks of the 10/22, but if a guy wants a reliable and accurate, light and handy 22LR for field use, I haven’t found anything better. I currently have 4 of them, one my 5yr old son’s rifle, plus a Marlin 99M1 which was my grandfather and father’s before me, and my son’s after me.
     
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  3. newfalguy101

    newfalguy101 Member

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    I have a soft spot for Marlin 60s.

    I prefer the older guns with the 18 round magtubes.

    My first gun was a Glenfield ( cheapy marlin ) and have put thousands of rounds through it.
     
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  4. Hookeye

    Hookeye Member

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    Coworker loves em...the M 60 that is....and specifically the super squirrel version. I prefer the 1022....but only in sporter config.
     
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  5. Hookeye

    Hookeye Member

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    My first rifle was a used glenfield model 20 and it outshot the 1022 I got the following year new....for fifty bucks.
     
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  6. Deltaboy1984

    Deltaboy1984 Member

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    They work great and shoot just fine!
     
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  7. Doc7

    Doc7 Member

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    Yes! Love mine!

    I want to pick a 795 up for Coon hunting though, I really don’t like the tube feed in the dark at 0200 hours with dogs going crazy next to me and my heart rate in the 150s.
     
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  8. Hookeye

    Hookeye Member

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    If you buy an old model 60 might want to invest in a new buffer
     
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  9. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

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    Only one in the safe belongs to the missus and it’s seen better days. Still shoots nice, carries easy, and not too difficult to work on in my limited experience. Might cost nearly as much replacing the broken trigger guard, misplaced action screw, buffer, and springs...may as well add a DIP rail too...as buying her a new one. I keep hoping this Spring she’ll take a shine to the 10/22 Sporter I bought her, but won’t hold my breath.

    A little spit and polish and they are a very good rifle. The price is right too.
     
  10. Mn Fats

    Mn Fats Member

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    Usually the question comes up, "is it better than the 10/22?". Yes. It is. So it's got less aftermarket, it doesn't need it.

    The model 60 is a very accurate and reliable .22lr autoloader. I won mine in a game of cribbage...or billiards...I can't rightfully remember. But I was about 10 or 11ish.

    I still own it and have cleaned up the stock and replaced the recoil buffer since I first acquired it. 20190305_174539.jpg
     
  11. stillquietvoice

    stillquietvoice Member

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    I have 2 both work well one is a glenfield the other is red Marlin. Both are older models with 18 round tubes.
    One, the red Marlin is going toy 6 yr old grandson. He already picked it out.

    There is at least one upgrade to the Marlin 60's MCarbo makes trigger kit.
     
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  12. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    Quite true. It takes a beating.

    I bought the Glenfield version back in the 80s, knowing that it was a cheap rifle. But, I bought it to see how well it would perform after extended shooting, and just for fun.
    I also bought a brick of Winchester Super-X to put through it.
    My impressions were that it was quite reliable and accurate and I liked the slender feel of it for offhand shooting.
    After 200 rounds with no jams, I field stripped it at home to inspect it and to clean it.
    I was disappointed to discover that Marlin had used a styrene plastic take-down pin to hold the lower action in place, and that this had broken at some point. But, it had still kept working.
    I replaced that pin with a piece cut from a section of a cheap .30 caliber aluminum cleaning rod, solving that issue permanently.
    After that I finished off the brick (300 rounds) and again experienced no jams that I can recall. It was very reliable.
    However, when I field stripped it again I was annoyed to discover that the plastic recoil buffer had broken. Obviously, someone at Marlin had made changes to the original parts to save money and had not bothered to test their endurance before mass producing them.
    So, I carved out a replacement buffer from a piece of rubber and installed that, solving that problem for many thousands of rounds.
    Overall, it was a great rifle, and assuming that the pin and the buffer problems were corrected, it still is.
     
  13. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    While not everyone will agree with you, I certainly do. They have a right to be wrong I suppose. ;)

    I've had mine about 15 years now. I got it shortly after I got married and I believe it was $129 at the time from Wally World. It's a very accurate rifle and if I were in the market for a budget .22, that would be what I would suggest.

    I'm considering investing in a higher quality .22, but I will always keep my model 60. They're great.
     
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  14. someguy2800

    someguy2800 Member

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    I am quite fond of mine but I have a few caveats to add. When I bought mine new a year ago the front sight was canted so badly that it could not be zero'd without knocking the rear sight out of the dovetail. The factory trigger is pretty darn bad, the factory front sight is pretty much a shapeless painted blob, and the rear sight is straight off a BB gun. Mine was also a jam-o-matic. To correct all this I refinished the stock in oil tinted with stain, did a trigger job on it, and tweaked on the extractor, ejector spring, and firing pin until it stopped jamming and light striking. Finally I drilled and tapped the barrel for an old Williams ramp front sight and installed a Williams peep sight. Its a lovely little rifle now and very very accurate for what it is. I like it very much now.

    90-E5416-D-80-A5-4818-A88-C-3-DAF56568508.jpg
     
  15. RedlegRick

    RedlegRick Member

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    My very first .22 was the Glenfield variant. Christmas present from my mom and dad when I was 14, and I shot the dickens out of it. Even was permitted to take it to school with me to fire on the basement rifle range we had (I was JROTC).
    Actually managed to wear it out inside of five years, between ridding the world of nefarious tin cans, homemade paper targets, rabbits and groundhogs, even a couple of coyotes. Learned a lot on it, most notably to be super aware of unloading it properly, as I had two of my three total NDs with it, and the reason I chose box magazine rifles ever after, but I still wouldn't turn my nose up at another, should one find its way into my gun locker again.
     
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  16. greyling22

    greyling22 Member

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    They're fine, but personally they have never fit me well at all The comb is too high for me to get my head down to see the sights. It would be great for a scope......

    My personal preference is against mag tubes. Easy for kids to handle, but that's about all I have positive to say about them.

    I think they fixed the issue, but I've had to repair by replacing the feed mechanism inside some of the older guns.

    I'm not trying to bash the m60, its a fine, reliable rifle, but it's not all positives.
     
  17. sparkyv

    sparkyv Member

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    I really like my Remlin M60, I'm a huge fan of the tube magazine, but it is not as reliable as my 10/22. It jams after getting dirty, but the Ruger just keeps on chugging merrily along. I enjoy them both.
     
  18. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    No, it isn't. I've owned both and the Model 60 can be a very good rifle if you get a good one, but it's a cheaper rifle if you get the Glenfield.
    Both rifles have stained birch stocks, but the 12-22 has much better sights.
    On my 10-22 the rear sight is an all-steel Ruger version of the Williams aluminum flip sight and the front sight is a proper all-steel Marbles type with a gold bead.
    On the Glenfield the rear sight was the typical and serviceable .22 stamped steel kind and the front sight was a coarse cast aluminum blade integral with the ramp. Serviceable but cheap.
    Internally, I think that the Ruger quality is better, and I think that the 10 round magazines are a cut above most stamped steel magazines.
    The lower action of the Model 60 uses a pot metal feeding guide and it just seems more primitive overall.
    They both work well and they both can be quite reliable, or not. Just the luck of the draw in today's world.
    Perhaps the micro-groove rifling of the Model 60 is an asset. I don't recall. I do remember that it was accurate.
     
  19. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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  20. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    Compared to the standard Ruger 10-22 the stock on the Marlin fits most adults much better. But Ruger shows nearly 100 different versions of the 10-22 and many of them have stock designs better suited for adults. FWIW I don't care at all for the standard Ruger. But I'd take a Ruger Sporter over 10 Marlins and they don't cost that much more. You'll just have to shop around to find one instead of picking up what is on the rack at Wally World. I've had both. After years of use the Ruger will keep shooting long after the Marlin is in the scrap heap. The weak link is the magazine. When the tube mag wears out on the Marlin it will cost more to repair than the gun is worth. When the mag wears out on a Ruger you throw it in the trash and get another. And most people already own spares.

    This one matches my CZ 452 for accuracy.


    https://ruger.com/products/1022Sporter/specSheets/1237.html
     
  21. George P

    George P Member

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    Mine is a lot more accurate than my 10/22; took it out yesterday, fed it everything from Golden Bullets to CCI Mini mags, no issues
     
  22. BigBore44

    BigBore44 Member

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    That’s the exact problem I have with them. But they sure are accurate little guns.
     
  23. 22250Rem

    22250Rem Member

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    Never owned one...... But I would like one. My only semi auto 22 is a 10/22 that I got a "can't refuse" deal on from a friend. Years before that I did a bunch of shooting with a Marlin 60 that a different friend had. A 10/22 is nice but I also miss shooting that Marlin 60. Having one of each would be sweet.
     
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  24. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    It's true that it's cheaper and easier to simply replace a 10-22 magazine with another for about $20.00 OEM.

    But, it is not prohibitively expensive to replace the parts on the cheaper Model 60.
    A Model 60 can be had for around $173.00, maybe less.
    If the magazine tube did fail, it would be the inner brass one with the plastic follower, not the outer steel one, which receives no wear.
    At Midwest Gun Works (one source) it costs about $33.65 for the OEM part.
    You might also need to replace the feed throat which, although made of pot metal, lasts a long time.
    The lower receiver assembly that houses this part disassembles easily with C clips holding it together.
    Same source, $17.45
    Total Parts= $51.10
    So, if your Model 60 has many thousands of rounds through it, it would still be worth dropping in those parts for $51.00, rather than scrapping it and buying a new rifle for $160.00 to $173.00.

    And if you just are unfortunate enough to break the magazine tube follower, these are available separately for $8.75 OEM, same source.
     
  25. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    Has not been my experience. Wearing out a Marlin mag tube must take more than 60 years, but I have had a few instances where I needed to replace lost or damage tubes, Marlin has provided them.

    My dad was infamous for losing his mag rod, I had to have ordered a dozen of them in the last 20yrs for his. Almost every season of coon hunting, walking miles of creeklines he’d manage to make it home without the tube. My late uncle bent his years ago, when he passed, my cousin, his son, asked me to source a new one to make it more usable. I personally needed a spare 99 tube (shorter than a 60 tube) when I converted my son’s 60 to a shorter barrel.

    In all of these instances, Marlin has sent me the parts, free of charge.

    So if my 1967, 1971, or 1977 Marlin ever end up needing a tube because they “wear out,” I know where I’ll start.

    I say it often - there are good reasons the Marlin 60 is the highest selling firearm of all time.
     
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