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What 7.62x54 do I have?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Deer Hunter, Dec 23, 2007.

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  1. Deer Hunter

    Deer Hunter Member

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    I couldn't find it on the net (7.62x54R.net). So does anyone know what kind of batch of ammo do I have?

    Headstamp is like this

    a star
    3 primer 10
    51


    And now a picture.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. MikeG

    MikeG Member

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  3. oneshooter

    oneshooter Member

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    It's also corrosive!!!:evil:

    Oneshooter
    Livin in Texas
     
  4. Hoppy590

    Hoppy590 Member

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    as said, bulgarian, made in 1951. during that date period it comes in 10 round bundles, 300 round tins.
     
  5. weaselchew

    weaselchew Member

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    Yep, as mentioned, it's Bulgarian made in 1951. I'd venture a guess that it's light ball (148 gr) as well. All heavy ball Bulgarian I've had/seen has not had the star on it for whatever reason.
     
  6. Avenger

    Avenger Member

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    I think it's the light ball as well. It was the heavy ball, it would plummet to the floor.....
    Fired any of it yet? What do you think of it? I've got some in the garage, haven't gotten a chance to run any of it through the rifles yet though.
     
  7. Nugilum

    Nugilum Member

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    If the bullet tip had a yellow tip, it would be a 182 grain, lead core, long-range "D" ball. If it didn't have a yellow tip, then it's 148 grain lead core "light ball". To verify the composition of the bullet is lead, see if a magnet will stick to either the bullet or the case.

    Steel = stick
    lead and brass = no stick

    And as oneshooter said, guaranteed to be corrosive.

    For a 56+ years old cartridge (1951), how did it perform? Was there any "hang time" after you pulled the trigger?
     
  8. Deer Hunter

    Deer Hunter Member

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    I see. I figured it was bulgarian, but since I didn't see anything when I looked it up, I had to check it out.

    I know it's corrosive. I clean my M44 after every outing. And it shoots just fine. My M44 doesn't hang up on much ammo, but I was pleasantly surprised at this stuff. Not a single problem, ejected very cleanly and had no hangfires whatsoever. This stuff is as fresh as the day it was made.
     
  9. Nugilum

    Nugilum Member

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    Good! I have 1500+ rounds of this myself.:evil:

    I remember hearing/reading somewhere that the US armed forces dumps their ammo after 40 years of storage. Anybody know why?:confused:
     
  10. Groucho_

    Groucho_ Member

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    Corrosive but that's no problem, any and all surplus ammunition should be treated as if it were corrosive. A bit of Windex down the bore after shooting, when you get home/back to camp clean with Hoppe's No. 9.

    That Bulgarian stuff's some good shooting ammo.
     
  11. Deer Hunter

    Deer Hunter Member

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    I did notice that it didn't seem as hotly loaded as my Czech silvertip, though.
     
  12. Onmilo

    Onmilo Member

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    Nugilum;
    Non-Corrosive priming compounds.
    These have a maximum shelf life of about sixty years under perfect conditions and the majority of the cartridges will be primer dead after about forty five years under normal storage conditions.
     
  13. ROMAK IV

    ROMAK IV Member

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    I have two 1200 round cases. They are some big and heavy suckers, and the only place is under the coffee table. Don't sweat the corrosive stuff just thorougly clean and dry your barrel after each shooting session. Corrosive ammo has been around quite a long time, so don't over-react. If it was a big deal, I wouldn't have so many 80+ year old rifles with mint bores. I had some reservations about using semiautomatics with corrosive ammunition, but my fears were unfounded.
     
  14. jpwilly

    jpwilly Member

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    Must be the Bulgarian Hydrogen Rounds.
     
  15. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    I need to buy some 7.62X54R ammo soon... I like the Bulgarian Heavy Ball ammo and so does my M91/30.

    Last year I got a 440 round tin that was actually quite a surprise. When I touched a magnet to the yellow tipped projectile, it STUCK!! Those rounds put a nice little hole in 3/8" steel plates!! :evil:
     
  16. Threejs

    Threejs Member

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    Make sure you check the cases on that. Some of them have cracks along the neck and shoulder right out of the packaging. The last case of bulgarian light ball I bought, I lost 10% to cracks. 13 of them I wiggled the bullets out with my fingers wiht no effort. (Yes the cracks where that bad)
     
  17. Deer Hunter

    Deer Hunter Member

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    When I shoot any of my surplus for my mosins (M44, and now TWO finns!) into the dirt against a backdrop, I get sparks due to the bullet reacting with the rock.
     
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