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What base and rings should I use for my long range shooting rifle?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by ShootAndHunt, Oct 11, 2004.

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  1. ShootAndHunt

    ShootAndHunt Member

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    I just bought a Savage 10FP-LE2. This is my rifle for long range shooting (300 ~ 800 yds). I am wondering the following problem:

    1. what type of base should I choose? one piece or two pieces?

    I heard that one piece is supposed to be stronger, but some said sometimes it also applies unnecessary torque to the scope tube which is not desirable? Is that true?

    I saw many savage 10FPs' pictures on this forum, and it seemed to me that they are all equipped with a one piece base? Any reasons compared to the two piece?

    2. There are also two type of bases and rings, one is accepting the weaver type rings, another is accepting Leupold type rings. The Leupold type base has the built in windage adjustment, but I rarely saw any long range rifle equipped with Leupold type base and rings. It seems to me you guys prefer weaver type base and rings, any reason for that?:confused:

    Thanks,
     
  2. ShootAndHunt

    ShootAndHunt Member

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    ooh ooh, could anyone help me on this?

    Thanks!
     
  3. mpthole

    mpthole Member

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    I'm sure others will chime in here, but guess I'll be the first. :)

    Leupold Mark IV or Badger Ordnance will probably be at the top of most folks list. I have the Mark IV on my 700 and am very happy with them. I've banged the rifle around quite a bit and they've held up well - POA=POI. :)

    If you are looking at scopes too, Premier Reticles is the place to go. They also carry Badger and Leupold mounts.

    The one piece versus two piece question...? I don't have an answer for you other than I've got the two piece Mark IV's on mine.
     
  4. ocabj

    ocabj Member

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  5. lycanthrope

    lycanthrope Member

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    Stay away....FAR AWAY...from the Leopold STD bases with windage adjustment. They and not secure and do not tolerate recoil well, particularly if you have a heavy scope. Trust me, my rifle ate several pairs.

    I prefer the Burris Zee rings and all steel bases like Weaver Grand slams or the Nightforce bases.
     
  6. Cindog

    Cindog Member

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    I'll second the Burris Signature Zee Rings. The inserts is what makes them worth it. I am sure that Burris can describe their product better than I can, but basically, they allow you to make windage and elevation adjustments with using the scope's windage and elevation adjustments. And they keep your scope from getting the dreaded scope rings.
     
  7. lycanthrope

    lycanthrope Member

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    Signature Zee's

    The Signature Zee's are pretty good and definately better for the scope finish, but they can also slide on heavy recoiling rifles with heavy scopes.

    Since you will be shooting deep, you may find yourself looking at some high magnification scopes. These can get pretty heavy and the inertia they can generate will tax the rings and mounts. If you find yourself using a scope with a forward lens of 50mm or larger you may really need to button it down to keep it from moving. I had to lap a set of Zee rings and then use Skotch Kote to lock it in (On a hot 7STW with an 8x40 50mm obj scope)
     
  8. El Rojo

    El Rojo Member

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    if you get a nice target scope, then you might have enough elevation to get to 800 yards. If you get a standard scope, you won't have it and you will need an angled base. I have a Leupold 6.5-20x50mm Long Range Target scope and in my .308 I was able to get out to 800 yards. However, at 900 and 1000 yards I had to hold over! I bought a IOR Valdera 20 MOA angled base and 30MM IOR Valdera rings for about 2/3 the cost of the same Badger Ordanence set up. I highly recommend them. I bought mine from Sniper Country. I see the IOR base is only $20 cheaper, but the rings are about $35 cheaper and that is $55 you save! A proper 20 MOA angled base will give you peace of mind vs. trying to shimmy the back of a two piece base. It is worth the cost.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. ShootAndHunt

    ShootAndHunt Member

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    Thans a lot for you guys' great infomation!::)
     
  10. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    I have been working to set up an old rifle for long range without a lot of expenditure. FLG made a tapered rear base out of blank Weaver stock to fit my elderly M70. I bought some Burris Zee - Pos Align rings to accomodate the offset so as not to strain my Leupold 3.5-10. I am now on at 600 yards with the scope elevation all the way down, so I have enough adjustment to make 1000. I'll find out if it works in two weeks at an F-Class match; my first foray into long range shooting. And all it will have cost me was the base, rings, some Stoney Point scope knobs, and a swivel stud to put a borrowed sniper bipod on. The rifle and scope were on the shelf. If I like the game, I'll look into a 30mm scope with more range of adjustment.
     
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