What caliber for a rechambered Yugo Masuer?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Ivy Mike, May 15, 2022.

  1. Ivy Mike

    Ivy Mike Member

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    I brought out the old Yugo Mauser M98/48 I inherited from my grandfather last time I went to the range and shot a couple magazines through it. The groups were pretty shabby but it is iron sights and a war surplus gun, although I was shooting new PPU ammo through it. I'm not the best marksman either but it was only 100 yards and I was having trouble ringing the big gong.On my red dot equipped AR, I can ring it all day.
    Now, I knew the bore was not in the best shape as it's kinda dark. I stopped at the counter on my way out and was BSing with one of the guys on staff at the range. Turns out he was the gunsmith for the range and for a few bucks for bench time, he offered to stick a bore scope down it and let me see whats what. Dark isn't the half of it. There is some pretty decent pitting and scoring. She's lead a hard life. The smith offered to run a couple gauges in but told me that the barrel was just about done. He said they could rebarrel it and spiff it up if I wanted, went into the spiel on it. I thanked him for his time and left.
    So here I am on the internets looking for your expert opinion. First off, this rifle is not original. It had its original stock cut and shaved down and sporterized. Bubba already dun his damage long before I was born. The way I see it, I have a nice captured German action and bolt that is asking me for a new barrel and a nice modern stock and optics. I'd like to use the existing bolt which means keeping the 12mm Mauser rim diameter. So what cartridge do you think would be a good fit? I immediately thought of 6.5 Creedmoor, but there's a whole wild world of .260 Remington, .280 Remington, .270 Winchester, 6.5x57 mauser. 7mm Mauser. I don't presently handload so assume factory ammo.
    If you had a war surplus German Mauser K98K action (by way of Yugoslavia) in good condition, what barrel would you stick on? And is it worth buying some reloading equipment?
     
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  2. Seedy Character

    Seedy Character Member

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    7x57 keeps it somewhat true to heritage
    Many were rechambered to .308. In that family, .243, .260, 7-08 are all good.
    .257 Roberts or .257 AI would be awesome.

    Not reloading, .243, .308, .270, .30-06 are probably your best choices, at this time.
     
  3. gotboostvr

    gotboostvr Member

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    I can think of over a dozen great cartridges I'd like to chamber an old mauser action in.

    But if you're not handloading, 243, 260, 6.5CM 7mm-08, 308, 25-06, 270 or 30-06 are going to be the ones to pick from.

    7x57, 8x57 or 6.5x55 would be good if you want to keep it in a euro chambering.

    A Quarter Bob would be a great throw-back.

    If it was my call, something like a 9.3x62 and build it into a post-war style safari rifle replete with barrel band sling attachments, and a Schnabel forend.
     
  4. High Plains

    High Plains Member

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    A 7x57 Mauser is a good choice. So is a 6.5 Creedmoor, a 270 Winchester, 280 Remington, or a 308 Winchester. You could go even smaller and have it become a 6 ARC. While I agree that it can have a new life (that you give it) this is also a good platform for a new / wanted cartridge. Get the stock upgraded, a Timney trigger, and modern scope rings and scope.
    VZ-24s and Belgium Mausers have gone to my gunsmith and came back a 6.5 Creedmoor, a 280 Rem, a 7mm Weatherby, and a 9.3x62 Mauser. All of them are sub 1” shooters with my handloads. New life is certainly possible.
     
  5. Dave DeLaurant

    Dave DeLaurant Member

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    What kind of condition is the military stock in? If the wood hasn't been butchered and the problems are limited to the bore, I'd probably favor rebarreling with a surplus 7.92x57 military barrel.

    https://www.libertytreecollectors.com/productcart/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=2902&idcategory=0

    If you're determined on sporterizing, 7x57 is always a good choice -- just be aware that these projects can become money pits in a hurry unless you can do most of the work yourself.

    As to handloading, I think that if the recent pandemic has taught us anything about ammo availability, it is to plan ahead and be flexible. I've added seven new-to-me cartridges to my reloading lineup since 2020, all obsolete rounds for which I only needed to acquire brass and dies. This was possible (and economical) because I already had plenty of suitable primers, bullets and powder on-hand, purchased before things got weird.
     
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  6. LoonWulf
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    LoonWulf Contributing Member

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    Couple notes.
    My Mexican Mauser wont stack or feed cases as straight as the CM, not saying your wont but id try it first.
    You can have our existing barrel rebored and rifled to some interesting chamberings. The cost should be in line with having a cheap aftermarket barrel fitted.
     
  7. dh1633pm
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    dh1633pm Contributing Member

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    Can't beat 8x57 to keep things the same. Your choices are numerous.
     
  8. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Since you don't have investment in reloading for 8mm, any of the above will do.

    As Dave says, by the time you have a new barrel, new stock, drill and tap for scope, bend bolt handle, and scope safety, you will have paid a lot.
     
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  9. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    I don't know why American's avoid the 8 mm, it is an outstanding cartridge. For a military action, 6.5 X 55, 7 X57, and 8 X 57 are excellent choices and safe bets. All great cartridges in their own right and I know 7 X 57's feed in 8mm actions without any issue.

    I would not chamber the thing in 308 Win. I have done this, the 308 Win is short, cases slide around in the magazine, sometimes that causes feed issues with weird stacking in the magazine. However, all the military cartridges, and the 257 Roberts, are magazine length.

    The 257 Roberts is a great round, however the chamber has to be deep reamed so the OAL of the cartridge is 2.9 inches. Once you seat the bullet out to 7 X 57 length, you now have extra powder space to add gunpowder, which will slightly increase the velocities, without increasing pressure! Greatest problem I had, was finding 257 Roberts cases. It took about seven years to buy new cases, and I had to pay scalpers prices. All the new production was snapped up by scalpers before I saw a case. :cuss:

    IqtaafW.jpg
     
  10. someguy2800

    someguy2800 Member

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    A whole slew of cartridges come to mind that I could wax poetically about, but having to buy factory ammo for it narrows the field down considerably. What are you going to use it for?

    The two cartridges that make the most logistical sense just in terms of availability and cost would be 308 or 6.5C, but I would be inclined to stay with the correct cartridge length for the magazine and do 7x57. PPU ammo is still relatively cheap.
     
  11. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Ah, yes, the saga of the .257 Remington Roberts.

    And even more velocity readily available by increasing the pressure up to levels normal for the other rounds sold in the same rifles.
     
  12. wiscoaster

    wiscoaster Member

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    7 x 57 Mauser is pretty well available at reasonable prices online all things considered and compared to some other cartridges.
     
  13. gotboostvr

    gotboostvr Member

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    And a fantastic cartridge in its own right. Plus, fitting with the actions pedigree.

    If you can stomach the cost of factory ammo, it's a very good way to go.
     
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  14. denton

    denton Member

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    If memory serves correctly, the Yugo is an intermediate length action that will not accommodate 30-06 or 270.

    7x57 loaded to modern pressure is an outstanding cartridge, as is the 6.5x55. But you're not reloading, so scratch those.

    So you are probably looking at something based on the 308 case: 308, 260, 243, etc.

    I have a Turkish Mauser that cost me $49. Made it into a very nice 30-06. One of the most expensive guns I own. Just sayin'.....
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2022
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  15. Seedy Character

    Seedy Character Member

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    .257R brass can be hard to find. Also, very to make from 7x57, 8x57, .270, .30-06.

    Most of the 7x57 brass I have loaded for my son's rifle, has .270Win on the headstamp. Range pick up, neither of have a .270. Cheap and easy.

    My 7mm Rem Mag ammo is made up of nearly belted mag cartridge available. No problems since I only have 1 belted magnums.

    My .260 Rem is loaded in .243, 7-08 and .308 brass. All cheaper and easier to find. Plus, I don't own those calibers.

    Reloading opens scores of opportunity.
     
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  16. someguy2800

    someguy2800 Member

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    The M48 is intermediate length, however the 98/48 is a standard length K98 action.
     
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  17. Remington1911

    Remington1911 Member

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    I can answer for this 'merican......because 8mm is in the same ballpark as 3006, anything we would do with the 8, the 06 can be done cheaper for us.

    On to the OP's question, I like the 7mm quite a bit, over the 8. I would likely lean that way. However if I wanted to shoot factory as inexpensive as possible I would lean to the common 'merican flavors.
     
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  18. Remington1911

    Remington1911 Member

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    Only thing I hate about doing ammo on line is it is just so heavy, so shipping can eat you alive. Some places want an "adult" signature, so you have to be home....strangely enough they will take my signature and I am far from an adult.

    Generally in thinking along these lines I think of what is available locally and lean that way.
     
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  19. mgmorden

    mgmorden Member

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    If I were to rebarrel it I'd say go with 8x57 again. The rebarrel itself is going to cost more than buying a brand new budget rifle of any modern/common chambering so its best to keep it original and unique. Besides - 8mm Mauser might not be all that popular today but its certainly VERY capable.

    Also - as to the "modern stock and scope" etc - I personally wouldn't - and I say that as someone whose been down that road before.

    Its just not cost effective. Unless you pour a LOT of money into the gun it's going to up up a (pardon the language) "half-assed sporter" which just isn't very nice to handle, shoot, or hunt with. Don't get me wrong you CAN spend the money to build a heck of a nice rifle off of a Mauser action, but most people no longer do because for the price involved you could just go buy 2 rifles just as nice.

    The rebarrel job is going to be between $350 and $500.
    Then at least $200 for a decent stock. If you go Boyds you can have them laser checker it for around $65, otherwise checkering is another $200-300.
    Rebluing - another $250.
    Sporter safety - $50.
    Drill/tap - $65-75.
    Forge bolt handle down for scope clearance or weld on a new handle - between $50 and $100.

    In the end you're $1000 to $1500 into a gun that no longer has the sentimental attachment of being your grandfather's gun (since the only thing left is the basic action), when you could have had a Browning X-Bolt or AB3, Tikka T3, etc for less than all those modifications cost.

    Have a rebarreled with a good condition military barrel and then spend the other money on a proper sporter.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2022
  20. GBExpat

    GBExpat Member

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    Me? I would replace it with an excellent (internal, at least) take-off K98k barrel (assuming that a 98/48 sports an identical barrel).

    BTW, I have done just that before.

    I had a pristine-bore K98k take-off barrel and noticed in SGN that someone (SARCO?) was offering "dark bore" re-arsed Yugo K98ks for $110 (this was 15+ years ago). The 2nd "dark bore re-arsed Yugo K98k that they shipped to me now sports that pristine-bore barrel. :)
     
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  21. Olympus

    Olympus Member

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    7x57 would probably be my choice also. Those Yugo Mauser actions were strong. You'd have the ability to seat bullets out really long and you'd definitely be able to surpass the modern 7mm08 performance that way.

    257 Roberts would probably be my second choice.
     
  22. wiscoaster

    wiscoaster Member

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    SG Ammo offers free shipping on orders over $200. I've never had a signature required for shipped ammo, and I've bought from numerous online vendors, so I don't know where you're ordering from, that you're running into that problem.
     
  23. denton

    denton Member

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    Not to be too contrary..... but.....

    I would not put an 8x57 barrel on it, unless I could get a free one. The 8x57 is a capable round. But the case capacity is just a mite small for the bullet diameter. To get a good BC, you have to go to a 200-225 grain bullet, and the boiler room isn't optimum for that much mass. The 8mm-06 is better, but hard to justify financially. (Unless you can get a nearly free barrel to ream out.) And that would be a handloading proposition.

    The 7x57 is a much better balanced cartridge, as is the 30-06.

    But, in the end, it's whatever pleases you.
     
  24. Nature Boy
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    Nature Boy Contributing Member

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    I vote for something Ackley-ized

    257 AI Bob

    or, if needing more performance

    280 AI
     
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  25. Ivy Mike

    Ivy Mike Member

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    Sorry it took so long to get back to this thread. I came down with the 'rona and haven't done much of anything. I don't have any loading equipment to speak of so I'd have to buy everything new. The stock is sporterized. It's been sanded down thinner, fore end cut down, finish stripped, etc. There's no saving the wood in terms of restoration, it would need a new stock.

    I'm just looking at this as a nice action in need of a barrel. 6.5 Creedmoor looks like the easiest thing if I want a more modern round with a fairly ready ammo supply. I can't really do any of the work myself as I don't have any machine tools. Hand stuff, yes. I could remove the old barrel myself, install a trigger etc, but fitting the new barrel is gonna be a gunsmith job.
     
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