What caliber is best for a new gun owner?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Vector, Dec 5, 2010.

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  1. Steve 48

    Steve 48 Member

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    A 22 rimfire or a 38/357 would be my choice.
     
  2. rogertc1

    rogertc1 member

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    Marlin M60....22
     
  3. Vector

    Vector Member

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  4. ATBackPackin

    ATBackPackin Member

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    For teaching marksmanship there is no better tool than a .22lr. I would also stay away from semi-autos because new beginners tend to get up there and just empty the magazine as fast as they can without practicing what you are trying to teach them. A nice bolt or lever action rifle or revolver (single action even better) I believe are the best teaching tools. Hard to go wrong with a nice Henry lever action rifle or Ruger Single Six revolver.

    Best of luck.
     
  5. Surefire

    Surefire Member

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    Another vote for .22

    For the same reasons stated above.
     
  6. True Grit

    True Grit Member

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    Well after I got out of diapers and graduated from my Red Ryder BB gun my first firearm was a single shot breakdown .410 from my papaw and soon there after my mom and dad bought me a .22 magnum. Both are a pretty good starting point. Mistakes don't care what caliber or guage it is because it only takes one. NO AUTOS AT FIRST. Kids need to learn good old fashioned mechanics and the simple fact if you can't do it in one shot maybe you need to be standing behind the guy with the gun. Pistols are a little different and I think only an experienced shooter should own one. You don't want to be like Barney Fife! Good tactics start early.
     
  7. Surefire

    Surefire Member

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    Going to add to my last post.

    The .22 is a great first gun.

    My choice for a second - once someone masters a .22 -- would be a .38 special (or .357 magnum). The .38 special is incredibly forgiving IMO, if the gun is a GP 100 or S&W L-frame recoil very mild, and ammo is relatively inexpensive for a center fire.
     
  8. -eaux-

    -eaux- Member

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    I have to agree with .22rf, and I hafta reccommend the Heritage Rough Rider Convertible .22rf/.22WMR.
    All of the simplistic trainablity of the Ruger, very nearly the accuracy, and a fraction of the cost. I carry them in both calibers and in 6" and 10" barrel lengths in the woods all the time as snake/squirrel/rabbit getters. As a first, I can't think of a better. That being said, if you can spend the money for the Ruger, of course go for the Ruger.
     
  9. Ignition Override

    Ignition Override Member

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    A rifle in .22 LR.
     
  10. Shadow 7D

    Shadow 7D Member

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    .22, is pretty much everybody's introduction to shooting,
    or a .410, 28,20ga shotty

    Or if they want to start in centerfire, a 9mm hand gun (still would go .22 for a rifle)
    ammo is a major expense, esp. if you are only 'kinda' into shooting.
     
  11. jamesinont

    jamesinont Member

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    My vote is for the .22lr. it's an obvious choice. ammi is cheap, won't develop bad habits, the guns themselves are cheaper, and *somewhat safer. I can shoot all day with my .22lr and it only costs me a few bucks! also, what is the gun going to be used for? I know a guy who bought his nephew a hunting license and paid for thr courses and a new gun only to find out he couldn't shoot anything, didn't have the heart. get something cheap and cheap to shoot until he knows he's interested and wants to get more into it.
     
  12. Sheepdog1968

    Sheepdog1968 Member

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    It's been said by many others but I am in agreement.

    A 22 LR rifle (semi auto, bolt, lever depending on your preference) is a great place to start and ammo is cheap. Based on my personal experiences, I'd reccomend a Ruger 10-22 as the starter rifle. They are an excellent mixture of price and accuracy and can be customized later on to just about any look you want.

    The two things I would immediately add onto it would be TechSights (ghost ring rear and front post) and a USGI sling.

    Then, I'd dig deep and spend the $80 and sign up for an Appleseed class nearby to learn basic marksmanship. I'd then practice for six months and take another Appleseed class. It's amazing at how much more will be learned/sink in taking the class a second time.

    I'd be in no rush to get a second rifle and maybe wait a year or more. That way, at the range, you'd meet people and get to try some various rifles and find what you like and dislike and well as what aspect of shoot most interests you (for example, bulls eye shooting, social plinking at the range, hunting, clay sport shooting, etc.).
     
  13. atlctyslkr

    atlctyslkr Member

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    S&w 500
     
  14. oldfool

    oldfool Member

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    22 rimfire yes
    (Buckmarks, Ruger MKs, and S&W revolvers highly reccomended)

    I don't get the responses re: rifle instead of handgun re: learning safety, muzzle control, etc.
    no different for an 18 year old than a 36 year old or 54 year old, any 1st time handgun shooter
    learning the rifle does not teach handgun control, no matter your age - for that you need a handgun, and no matter how expert a rifleman or wingshooter, it a whole other ballgame that can only be learned by way of instruction and practice
    somebody oughta' tell Uncle Sam to quit teaching those 18 year olds to shoot handguns, restrict 'em to M4s and RPGs only ??
    (if you truly believe you can teach handgun muzzle control with a rifle, well just teach 'em muzzle control with that BB rifle)

    5 year old no, 18 year old yes, if want to learn handgun shooting, get 'em a 22 handgun, any flavor you/they prefer
    and encourage them to vote RKBA
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2010
  15. Al LaVodka

    Al LaVodka member

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    .22 or .38 in a .357.
    Al
     
  16. lloveless

    lloveless Member

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    Wow, a mixed bag of responses. The first gun I shot was a 1911 .45 ACP age 6. I was hunting with my mothers jc higgins .22lr rifle at age 10. The first gun I bought at age 17(actually a bud's mother bought for me with my money)was a Remigton single shot .22 short, long and LR with a peep sight. Plenty of possums and squirrels fell to it. Wish I still had it. Yes safety should be learned with a BB gun in either rifle or pistol configuration. I think a first rifle should be a single shot .22 that can shoot all the rimfires. When that is mastered a good single action revolver. Slow determined perfect practice is what makes perfect. Not the amount of lead slung down range willy-nilly.
    ll
     
  17. Black Butte

    Black Butte Member

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    The best choice would be a popular and proven .22 rimfire rifle such as the Ruger 10/22 or Marlin Model 60.
     
  18. TexasBill

    TexasBill Member

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    Henry H001 lever-action 22lr. Fun to shoot, easy to master, under $300.00.
     
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