Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

What do you use to remove those burn rings from the cylinder face?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Arch, Oct 3, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Arch

    Arch Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2005
    Messages:
    251
    Location:
    Global
    Not the rings inside the cylinder, but those burn rings that form on the front of the cylinder face of a stainless/nickled/chromed revolver.

    I am slowly getting them off with a light bore cleaning solvent and a rag, but it's taking a long time. I couldn't say if they were there when I brought the gun, or if they are my doing (second hand revolver).

    Thanks.
     
  2. Risasi

    Risasi Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2004
    Messages:
    851
    I just use CLP, and I don't bother to clean up the muzzle or cylinder face on any of my SS slide actions or revolver. I just get them cleaned up enough that it functions properly. Usually I am too lazy to clean past that smoky gray color it leaves on the metal.
     
  3. Diamondback

    Diamondback Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2003
    Messages:
    588
    Location:
    WA State
    What works for me:
    - good: old toothbrush, "Blue Wonder" or other similar solvent......and elbow grease.
    - better: lead removal cloth...do NOT use on a blued revolver as it will wear away the finish.

    I am interested in what works for others.

    -regards
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2005
  4. Clemson

    Clemson Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Messages:
    644
    Location:
    Greenwood, SC
    Use one of those Yellow "Lead Away" cloths from the gun store or even Walmart. Wrap it around a popsicle stick for a backer, and rub the rings. They will come off with some elbow grease.

    Don't use this on a blued gun. On SS, it is just fine.

    Clemson
     
  5. foghornl

    foghornl Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Messages:
    7,403
    Haven't tried the "lead away" cloth, have used the "Flitz" metal polish and 'elbow grease'. Works well on my Stainless Vaquero.
     
  6. MillCreek

    MillCreek Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Messages:
    831
    Location:
    Snohomish County, Washington USA
    For those who may have a revolver with a titanium or aluminum cylinder, using a Lead Away or similar cloth is not recommended. It will strip away the protective coating on the cylinder face, leading to flame erosion.
     
  7. Kramer Krazy

    Kramer Krazy Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2004
    Messages:
    925
    Location:
    Easley, SC
    For anything that is not blued, which for me is just stainless, the wife and I have used a lead-away cloth, Nevr-Dull wadding cloth, and she's used silver polish. All seem to work fairly well.
     
  8. YodaVader

    YodaVader Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Messages:
    940
    Location:
    Indiana
    On my stainless revolvers I used to use a lead removing cloth. I found an old can of No.7 White Polishing Compound for cars and tried it out using a cloth and it quickly removes the residue from the cylinder face with minimal effort.
     
  9. NVMM

    NVMM Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2005
    Messages:
    435
    Location:
    NV
    Flitz works well.
     
  10. Arch

    Arch Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2005
    Messages:
    251
    Location:
    Global
    All great info here.

    The lead wipes seem popular, I'll see if I can get one for cheap.

    I could see polish working, as it would be gently abrading the surface.

    Unfortunatly everyone has mentioned elbow grease.....DOH! :rolleyes:
     
  11. Working Man

    Working Man Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2005
    Messages:
    1,553
    Location:
    DFW Tx
    Toothpaste and a heavy rag. Works great.
     
  12. bigmtnman

    bigmtnman Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    Northern Colorado
    I use Slip2000 Carbon Cutter. You can either hang the cylinder in the jar for a few minutes and rinse off (best method) or wet the surface with Carbon Cutter and wipe off a few minutes later. Works for me.
     
  13. Kramer Krazy

    Kramer Krazy Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2004
    Messages:
    925
    Location:
    Easley, SC
    Be careful with what you use. That brushed, satin-stainless finish on some firearms can become a high-gloss, polished firearm in spots, if you use too abrasive of a cleaner, and too often.
     
  14. PigPen

    PigPen Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2003
    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Great State of Tennessee
    Flitz

    I feel so strongly about it for stainless that I must say it again........Flitz.

    On blued finish, use extreme caution!! Some take it some don't.

    I 've never had a problem with Stainless though.

    PigPen
     
  15. Frandy

    Frandy Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,354
    Location:
    NC
    Toothpaste can be abrasive. Flitz is not abrasive. That doesn't mean that Flitz won't harm some finishes, just that it is a very fine polisher. Excellent product.

    Oh, and Simichrome is also a fine product but a bit more abrasive than Flitz.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2005
  16. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    23,908
    Location:
    Arizona
    Arch:

    If you're going to shoot the gun you are going to a lot of trouble for nothing. Using a polish or abrasive with plenty of effort will get it off, but eventually you'll get through the finish - hard as it is.

    You do want to get excessive build-up's of lead off of the cylinder face, because they can cause the cylinder to bind. But the burn marks don't hurt anything except you're feelings.

    And the first time you shoot a cylinder full of cartridges they're back.
     
  17. Ala Dan

    Ala Dan Member in memoriam

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    12,879
    Location:
    Home Of The First Capitol Of The Confederate State
    Flitz or Simichrome

    If NO gunshop/gunstore is present in your locale, swing by your nearest
    auto parts dealer (or motorcycle shop) and pick up a tube of Simichrome.
    Or you can order on-line from The Wood Doctor. You only use a
    small amount; combined with a little elbow grease and those nasty rings
    on the cylinder face of ss/nickel/chrome six-shooters will disappear. :D
     
  18. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    24,041
    Location:
    Idahohoho, the jolliest state
    I always remove the cylinder from the frame and let it soak at least a couple hours, and usually overnight, in a jar of Hoppe's No. 9. That doesn't solve the problem, but makes it much easier to contend with.
     
  19. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    23,908
    Location:
    Arizona
    I think the revolver in question is chrome or nickel plated, in which case you don't want to soak the cylinder in a bath of Hoppe's No. 9, or any other bore solvent. Bore solvents are compounded to desolve and/or attack copper and nickel compounds. I have seen a fair number of finish-ruined handguns that were nickel plated, and put away wrapped in a Hoppe's soaked rag.
     
  20. Seven High

    Seven High Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Messages:
    731
    I use a typewriter eraser. It is the round one with the black plastic brush attached. It works real well. No problems so far. :)
     
  21. juneau803

    juneau803 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2005
    Messages:
    95
    Location:
    Southeast Alaska
    Hoppe's "Elite" cleaner takes it off pretty nicely.

    I find myself using it more and more instead of harsh solvents.
     
  22. TimboKhan

    TimboKhan Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Messages:
    8,141
    Location:
    Greeley, CO
    I am going to make many of you scream in disbelief at what an idiot I am, but I routinely use scotchbrite to get rid of those rings, and I have noticed no damage at all thus far. Wouldn't use it on blued, obviously, but it works wonders on my stainless cylinders.

    Note: I actually just picked that pistol up and inspected it with my loop, and I can find zero damage on the face of the cylinder there, which is the only place I use the scotchbrite on....
     
  23. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    23,908
    Location:
    Arizona
    It will take a long time for the Scot-Brite pads to damage the cylinder face, but I think the real issue is that everytime you shoot the revolver the rings are back. If you seldom shoot the gun the extra work might be worth it, but if you shoot often you're going to a lot of work for nothing. The discoloration that the burn marks represent don't cause any problems.
     
  24. Arch

    Arch Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2005
    Messages:
    251
    Location:
    Global
    Shooting al least 3 times a week, I might just learn to live with the burn marks...
     
  25. TimboKhan

    TimboKhan Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Messages:
    8,141
    Location:
    Greeley, CO
    Old Fuff,

    Venerated Old One, you are, as almost always, correct. Let me say that I don't immediatly scrub the rings off after every shooting session. In fact, I generally only scrub them off once or twice a year, mostly because my hatred of cleaning guns is roughly equal to my love of shooting them.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page