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What does the felt pad in the buttstock of an Enfield do? Is it really needed?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by Rockrivr1, Aug 3, 2006.

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  1. Rockrivr1

    Rockrivr1 Member

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    Ok, I'm trying to take apart a Enfield 2A and the instructions indicate to take out the felt pad that is against the anchoring screw for the buttstock. I've tried for over an hour last night and I couldn't get it out. Probably because is so old it's petrified at this point. Anyway, at this point I'm just going to get the screwdriver in there and see if I can losen the bolt. If the felt pad gets ruined there isn't a lot I can do.

    Do you really need it in there, what does it accomplish and if I ruin it do I really need to get a new one to put in it's place?

    Thanks for the help.
     
  2. Chipperman

    Chipperman Member

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    It's an emergency tea strainer.





    :neener:
     
  3. longrifleman

    longrifleman Member

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    My understanding is it served as a protection for the oil bottle that was stored in the hole. It was missing in all three of the Enfields I have. They haven't blown up yet.:)
     
  4. RonJon

    RonJon Member

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    Rockrivr1,

    To get it out, take apart a common wire clothes hanger and form it into a long rod. Then using a pliers, bend a very short "L" at the tip with it forming a very slight backwards angle. It may also help to sharpen the end of it to a bevel tip to better grab under the leather pad (all the ones I've seen were leather, but maybe they used felt too).

    Now just reach in there and catch it in and under the hole in the center of the pad and work it out. It will help to have a small flashlight to see what is happening in there while you do it.

    HTH :eek:

    Ron
     
  5. Vairochana

    Vairochana Member

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  6. Diomed

    Diomed Member

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    It's usually leather, and longrifleman is close - it was to prevent the oil bottle from knocking against the stock bolt and making noise.

    If you want to save it, use RonJon's method. If you don't care, then get your big screwdriver and pound it into the slot, through the washer. That's really the only option if it's too degraded to be removed by the hook method. Replacements are usually about a buck apiece if you feel you need one.

    Actually, the last time I did it, the washer came out none the worse for wear!
     
  7. Rockrivr1

    Rockrivr1 Member

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    Thanks everyone for the information. If it doesn't have any mechanical usefulness, I'll re-use it if I can salvage it. The instructions I have are from surplusrifles.com and it indicated that the gasket was felt. Whether it's felt or leather, its definitely petrified and won't come out. Tried again last night with the hanger idea and that didn't work either. Sounds like the big screwdriver and hammer time. :uhoh:
     
  8. Limeyfellow

    Limeyfellow Member

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    Its the stock bolt wad. They were designed originally for the brass oilers made from leather up until 1954 when some of the No4 Mk2s were given fibre ones made of cardboard. For most people its not important but its nice keeping around for its collectors value in the future and that its an original part.
     
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