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What Guns in Production Today Will Still Be in Production 100 Years From Now?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by FMJMIKE, Dec 4, 2009.

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  1. FMJMIKE

    FMJMIKE Member

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    What Guns in Production Today Will Still Be in Production 100 Years From Now ???
     
  2. Ridgerunner665

    Ridgerunner665 Member

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    1911's...:)
     
  3. BrianB

    BrianB Member

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    Wow, this will be an interesting list. I'll get us started with the classics & popular:

    1911
    AK-47
    M1A1
    AR-15
    UZI
    Glock
    FAL
     
  4. Liberty1776

    Liberty1776 Member

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    Model 94 Winchester, in 30-30
    Remington 870 Wingmaster
    Marlin Model 60 .22 LR
    Ruger 10-22
    Savage Model 11 in .308
    Ruger semi-auto pistol in .22 LR (by then, it'll be the MK XV...)
     
  5. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

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    I think that in 100 years, firearms will be a historical tinkerer's hobby, and that projected energy weapons will be used for defense and offense. If this is correct, then the guns that people will be most curious about will be those with historical interest attached to them, with the lore that comes with war and cop stories. I think there will still be Colt SAA replicas out there, 1911s, Glocks, S&W revolvers, Hi-powers, Winchester lever guns, and ARs aren't going anywhere anytime soon. ARs will go down in history as the original modular, do-it-yourself gun that was the U.S. issue rifle longer than any other rifle before it. There will be hobbyist clubs and publications for them like there are hot rod magazines for Model As, Ts, and Mustangs now.
     
  6. wrs840

    wrs840 Member

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    As far as "current classics"?

    AK-47
    1911
    BHP

    In that order of probability.

    My Guess.

    Les
     
  7. wgaynor

    wgaynor Member

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    Ruger 10/22
     
  8. ClayInTX

    ClayInTX Member

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    I go along with mljdeckard—to a degree...

    There are rumors that Projected Energy Weapons are in existence now, and I will not dispute that. I recall seeing a demonstration back in the 1960s of a laser cutting steel and heard rumors that a laser was used during the Nicaragua stint to capture Noriega.

    The problem with lasers is a power supply light enough to be portable by a person. Of course if that ever happens we will have to register our flashlights (electric torches to you Brits) as assault flashlights, and those olive drab ones carried by the Boy Scouts will certainly make the evening news.

    News cast:
    “And now we switch to John Brown at the site of yesterdays mass shining at the Westside Mall. John, are you there?”

    “Yes, Sally, it seems as if a lone shine-man walked into the local Sears and started flashing everyone in sight. Here’s an eye witness. Mam, you say you were here when the flasher walked in? What happened?”

    “Well, he dropped his pants...”

    “Back to you, Sally”
     
  9. Oro

    Oro Member

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    As much as I like them, I hate to point out that it can't be on the OP's "list." He said "in production today" and, unfortunately, they are not (except in Mossberg copies and Marlin variants). I heard there may be a limited edition made next year, but no regular production is foreseen - it's been gone since 2006. Now in reality I bet once they've been out of production a few more years, used prices will skyrocket and production will come back.

    I disagree that "guns" as we know them will be gone in 100 years. Chemical powered firearms as we know them are cheap. They are powered by cheaply made chemicals that require no maintenance or impressive engineering. "Laser weapons for everyone" by the end of the century is sort of like flying cars were in the 1950s.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2009
  10. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

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    Clay, I think about this too, but remember, there is a lot of industry pushing for longer-lasting, more compact power sources in a LOT of different devices. A hundred years is ETERNITY in technological years.
     
  11. thebigc

    thebigc Member

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    walther ppk. browning high power
     
  12. Isher

    Isher Member

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    Keith Richards and cockroaches.

    No guns.


    isher
     
  13. ClayInTX

    ClayInTX Member

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    mljdeckard, I agree. In my post, above, I was going to expand on the laser but the brief newscast scenario popped into mind and I just couldn’t resist.

    Yes, power sources will certainly get smaller and more powerful. Also, lasers will get a tighter beam to concentrate the power.

    But I have to acknowledge Oro’s logic. Chemicals contain a lot of power, as demonstrated by attempts to make a viable electric car. A six pound gallon of gasoline contains more energy than can now be pumped into a 400 pound storage battery. And a few grams of gunpowder packs a wallop.

    However, I sometimes wonder if in 100 years we’ll be disassembling our rifles and using the barrels as clubs.

    But...
    Back to the OP’s question. Most revolvers, or minor variants thereof, will be in production. Automatics will change to the point that these cannot truly be called a continuation of a current model. The same philosophy will apply to rifles and shotguns.

    Now if I could just stick around to see if my predictions are correct.
     
  14. ms6852

    ms6852 Member

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    1911 acp
    marlin 30-30
    marlin 336 35 remington
    ruger 10 22
     
  15. wrs840

    wrs840 Member

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    OK. I have one and like it... but pray tell, what's your logic on that one?

    I'm looking forward to being an Omniscient trail-blazer.

    Les
     
  16. Deus Machina

    Deus Machina Member

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    Well, I think 1911's and AK's are likely the only ones to be manufactured, in the same configuration they are now, and even then likely in very much the same way they make black powder guns now. Probably some others, like the lever-actions in .30-30, and AR's, other military-looking stuff, probably mostly as curiosities.

    Now, assuming the laws don't prohibit us much more...

    I don't think that we will have concealable beam, sonic, or railgun-type weapons in any worthwhile manner. Ammunition is very space-efficient, completely self-contained, and doesn't care how you handle it, if you get it wet or use it in a vacuum or room full of inert gas.

    Energy-based weapons of any kind, so far, are very fragile by comparison and will likely never be as durable as a good handgun. Even if they are, you're also relying on the fact you will have a good battery and stuff like a capacitor (in a railgun-fashioned weapon) won't have been cracked or popped.

    Even in a lot of my favorite sci-fi, vehicles (largely space ships) rely heavily on beam weapons, plasma is available, but missile and projectile weapons still play a large part (beam weapons don't explode on contact). Handheld weapons are still often firearms, with new-technology ammunition.

    I think we're more likely to move to caseless ammunition than we are to ditch the firearm. And I do think we're likely to move to much smaller calibers at much higher speeds, once we make a few more jumps in hollowpoint or explosive-expansion technologies. Really, why carry a .45 ACP at 950 fps, when we may have 4mm Federal Caseless at 4200fps? They may very well both expand to .9" by that point.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2009
  17. Oyeboten

    Oyeboten Member

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    S & W Model 10-whatever...

    1911s

    Repop Colt 'Navy' and probably Remington Cap-n-Ball Revolvers...'Walkers'...Dragoons...
     
  18. FourNineFoxtrot

    FourNineFoxtrot Member

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    I'm not at all sure that energy weapons will replace projectile weapons, soon or ever. Frankly, there's more of an impetus toward developing non-chemical propelled projectile weapons (i.e, rail-guns, gauss guns, etc.) than toward actual energy weapons like lasers and whatnot. I could certainly be wrong, I don't have much of a scientific background, but that's what I'm hearing these days.

    I will say this, though. The power output requirement of either energy or non-chemical-propellant weapons is going to be high. I'm thinking there may be a significant advantage for old fashioned boomsticks for quite a while, since they don't need power packs or constant recharging at a power supply, and ammo can be manufactured cheaply and easily (comparatively, anyway).

    Maybe wealthy nation-states will arm soldiers with something more advanced than guns in the next century, or maybe not. But I think when 2109 rolls around the weapon of choice for hunting, self-defense, and probably most countries will still be some manner of firearm.


    As for guns I think might survive the next 100 years?

    The 1911 will never die. Never. In a thousand years somebody's dress uniform will include wearing them on their belt like the Marines and the Mameluke Sword today.

    The AK-47, or some little-changed variant. There are so many of them around, and they do their job so well, I don't see them going away soon. Especially in the Third World, where they do not (and maybe never will) have the manufacturing capacity or energy production and support infrastructure for anything fancier. I would bet money that a century from today there will be factories in Africa laboriously churning out AKs.

    M2 Browning Machine Gun. The venerable Ma Deuce has been around near a century without change. There are faster machine guns, lighter machine guns, bigger machine guns, but there's still nothing that does what the M2 does any better than the M2. If the year 2109 has need of machine guns at all, it will have need of the Ma Deuce.

    Probably many of the bolt-action hunting rifles we know today will still be around. I suspect we've reached the apex of how much technology it's worthwhile to hump along to take a deer. Or at any rate, while the hunter of the 22nd century may have a Ghillie suit that makes him literally invisible or something, he'll probably still make the shot with a rifle we'd all recognize.
     
  19. Hold My Own

    Hold My Own Member

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    1911's and AK-47's will always have a place on this Earth in my book.
     
  20. nwilliams

    nwilliams Member

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    Who knows what will still be in production, probably nothing since by then we'll all be slaves to our robot overlords.

    Not sure what will still be in production but I imagine AK's will still be around and still widely used in 2110, the AR platform will probably be in abundance as well.
     
  21. zombienerd

    zombienerd Member

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    I really don't think we'll see too many "firearms" 100 years from now. Technology is moving past gunpowder, and besides a few "classics", I'm betting that only a few of todays weapons would make it that far.

    We would probably see directed-energy, electromagnetic, solid-fuel, etc weapons. I'm hoping I live to buy a Plasma rifle in the 40 watt range. Although I must say that 40 watts doesn't seem to be enough energy to do much damage, hell, a 40 watt lightbulb can barely burn you after an hour :)

    As soon as fusion is figured out, we'll be seeing portable units small enough to wear. With that kind of power on tap, things like the ADS (Active Denial System: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Active_Denial_System ) could be made to be carried.
     
  22. Extremely Pro Gun

    Extremely Pro Gun Member

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    Guns will be banned by then. We will only have what we have now.
     
  23. Billy Shears

    Billy Shears Member

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    I must disagree with this statement entirely. I don't think we'll see such weapons for centuries yet. The problem is one of power. Even assuming you can make a man-portable laser or microwave emitter capable of killing another human being, and durable enough to stand up the the rigors of military service, what are you going to use for a power source? Battery technology is a LOOOOOOOOONG way from meeting the energy needs of such a weapon. We can't even make batteries today that will make electric cars truly competitive with internal combustion engines in terms of overall utility and practicality. When do you think we'll have a battery capable of providing multiple shots for a sufficiently lethal energy weapon, and that will occupy a space no larger than the magazine of a conventional firearm, and that can be changed as quickly as a firearm's magazine? Until there is such a power source, firearms will not be supplanted by energy weapons; they won't be supplanted for precisely the same reason electric cars have not taken over from gasoline-engined ones (despite the fact that they've been around just as long) -- overall ease of use, practicality, and versatility are not as great as with the "old-fashioned" technology.

    A hundred years from now I'd fully expect most military and law enforcement firearms (sadly, I think civilian ownership will all too likely be gone) to use some sort of caseless ammo. I wouldn't even be surprised to see a return of the gyrojet for some applications. But energy weapons? Not by then. It's going to take incredible advances in power generation & storage technology before we see practical weapons like Star Trek phasers or Star Wars blasters. The closest I think we'll have is precisely what FourNineFoxtrot said: some kind of rail gun or gauss gun that uses some other form of energy than chemical to launch projectiles -- but will still launch solid projectiles.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2009
  24. FuzzyBunny

    FuzzyBunny Member

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    Well, 100 yeats ago they called you nuts if you said there would be folks flyiing around. Like 300 people in a aluminium tube going 500 mph.

    If you could project 40 watts to a humans "sweet spot" in a neuro center you could drop them fast. How many laser watts does it take to blind someone? Who knows where we will be in just 50 years?

    To stay on topic I think the 1911 might still be made just not on the scale they are now.
     
  25. wishin

    wishin Member

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    The Single Action Army will always be produced by someone, if only to make westerns.
     
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