What guns should a father give to his children?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by kamagong, Jul 7, 2009.

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  1. Titan6

    Titan6 member

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    Yokel they understood that at age 7. I have odd children.... very smart. Our dinner conversations run more along the lines of the concept of infinity and red light - blue light phase shifts of gravitational singularities.
     
  2. Sport45

    Sport45 Member

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    That's been my plan as well.
     
  3. TooTaxed

    TooTaxed Member

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    Give 'em anything you want, as long as it meets 3 criteria, in order of importance:

    1. Make sure they are well schooled in the safe way to handle it and care for it.

    2. Proven to be reliable, not subject to problems.

    3. Ammunition readily available.


    For the basic safety and shooting training, suggest you teach 'em on .22 LRs...you can get in a lot of training for next to no money.:p
     
  4. NC-Mike

    NC-Mike Member

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    Maybe thats why your agenda struck me as... advanced. :)
     
  5. FiREhAwk

    FiREhAwk Member

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    My first gun was a 20ga break action shotgun when I was 11. Then a 10-22 that I had for a few years (bought a new one several years ago). When I was 15 my parents bought me an 870 express super magnum, a year after that a savage .270. they last gun my parents bought me was a AR-15 that I recieved my junior year of high school. My father gave me his browning A-bolt that I had wanted for years, right before I graduated. I sold the savage when I moved out on my on as I hard up for cash. I wish I hadnt but it was to a cousin so I see it from time to time and its in good hands.
     
  6. Sport45

    Sport45 Member

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    I agree. You do have odd children. :) :)
     
  7. punkndisorderly

    punkndisorderly Member

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    You know, it's not really the guns that they will value. It's the memories that go with the guns that they will value. A ratty .22 that they remember learning to shoot with as a child. Or the .30-30 they took their first dear with will mean much more than an AR-15 just handed to them.

    Also, don't fall into the "stuff trap" (working extra hours to buy things for them rather than working less hours to spend time with them). Just my .02.
     
  8. Cowboygunsmith

    Cowboygunsmith Member

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    It will all depend on when you plan on giveing it to them and at what age. I gave my son his first gun at five (a quality air gun) that he used only when I was with him and for him to learn proper shooting skills. If I were you I would be more worried about teaching him/her proper shooting skills to include saftey and target reconition than I would be the weapon. When the time comes he or she will be excited over what ever it is you give them. Ben there done that!
     
  9. SCKimberFan

    SCKimberFan Member

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    At this point, there is not many choices that meet #3.

    Odd children... or odd parents? :D
     
  10. Old John

    Old John Member

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    Single barrel shotgun.........

    My old Dad taught me to shoot & let me hunt on the farm, at 12 years old, with an old beat-up 16 ga. single barrel shotgun.......about 57 years ago. He taught me to make that one shot count. I have that old 16 ga. here at home now.
    A couple years later he bought me my own, a 20ga. I used it many years.
    It was passed down to my older son.
    My younger son wanted to start out with a 12 ga.

    Each of my boys got their own single barrel and a single shot .22 rifle.
    Dad thought that was a pretty good start. Me too.
    My younger son turned 34 years old in May. He's an avid hunter, all year round. My older boy will go out for a rabbit hunt with us once in awhile.
    All of their kids have learned to shoot.
     
  11. 45Badger

    45Badger Member

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    So far, this is what I've got set aside for each boy (14 and 11)-

    AR15 with gobs of mags
    M1A with gobs of mags
    M1 Garand
    Remington 870 Wingmaster with multiple barrels
    Bolt action .223
    Bolt action .308
    Stainless Competition Model (slab side) mark 2 pistol
    Glock 19 with gobs of mags
    2 1911s with gobs of mags
    2 k frame .38
    2 k frame .357
    1 k frame .22
    2 bolt action .22 LRs
    Ruger 10/22


    Plenty of factory ammo for all. I've got two Dillon 550Bs, and a fair supply of components. Spare parts/springs for most. There are other assorted guns, but these are the core holdings I want each to have as they enter the world.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2009
  12. Ala Dan

    Ala Dan Member in memoriam

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    Well, actually I'm going too leave all my firearms to my one and only
    daughter; as she is the only child. Its quite a nice, small collection;
    well worth the time and expense it took to put it together~! ;)
     
  13. 10-Ring

    10-Ring Member

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    I think children should get the stories behind the guns too -- why this gun or that and why it is so special to keep. Now, if you're leaving an entire collection, hopefuy your kids are shooters and can appreciate what they get!
     
  14. 1-UP

    1-UP Member

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    Cripes, are you guys buying $200 basketball shoes every season, new cars for the kid at 16 and then paying their way through college too?

    I guess I just like the idea of guns being passed down and/or given that have some sort of meaning/memories behind them. Getting a laundry list of firearms given to you seems to...cheapen the idea somehow.

    Not saying that giving somebody a gun as an "atta boy" for graduating high school or whatever isn't a a great idea, because that has meaning. Getting 4-5 guns for hitting adulthood just seems...spoiled.
     
  15. 45Badger

    45Badger Member

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    Nope on the shoes and cars. Yep on the guns. Hopefully on the college. It's how I choose to spend my disposable income and how I spend a heck of a lot of time with my kids (and soccer, baseball, etc). Sorry if it doesn't fit your idea of proper parenting, gift giving, or financial management. My kids are both bright, do well in school, play nicely with other kids, interact well with adults, and seem pretty happy. Seems to work for us.

    I'm not sure I will give them these when they turn 18 (The older I get the less "adult" that age seems). Probably after they settle down and I won't be worried about them selling them to fund a donor-cycle;)
     
  16. Stormshotty

    Stormshotty Member

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    I will inherit my father's guns, my children shall inherit mine. So it shall go until the last one dies...
     
  17. jaholder1971

    jaholder1971 Member

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    I received my great grandfather's Winchester 97 and 1890 in .22 WRF, along with a Colt 1911 and 1903 that we believe he brought back from the Marines after serving on the U.S.S. Houston during WW1.

    From my grandfathers I received nothing, which under the circumstances is fine by me.

    When my father died I received his M65 3 inch .357 he carried as a detective and later sergeant, as well as the IBM M1 carbine I bought him.

    I have no children, my nephews won't get them as one's a child molester and the other's a thug in juvenile detention. Hopefully my 3 nieces will marry shooters.
     
  18. tdowell

    tdowell Member

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    I agree, my experience was different than most I guess. My dad and an old uncle taught me to shoot and taught me a love of country, of hunting, and of shooting. Then, when I developed a passion for shooting, my father required me to earn the money to buy me first gun, a Mossberg 500. I'll always treasure that gun because of the work I had to put into it from delivering newspapers and detasseling for a whole summer. There's more blood sweat and tears in the ole shotgun then in my finest AR. Though I'm in my late 30's, my dad is still alive and LORD willing, will be for many years to come. When he passes, I'm sure I will inherit several of his guns, they will mean alot to me, and will go right beside the ole Mossberg. Just my .02
     
  19. WinchesterAA

    WinchesterAA Member

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    There's something important to remember about all firearms, and all tools...

    When they were designed, they were most likely designed by one person, to fit that person's model of what he thinks he needs.

    It seems obvious to me, but when I look at tools, I see some dude going through his life then all of a sudden he has a hiccup, and as a result he creates a pump action shotgun, or a bolt action rifle, or a semi-auto pistol, or a lever action rifle.

    Some you pull back, some you push forward, some you turn sideways, some you don't really even mess with (break actions), some that are quite simple, like open bolt designs.

    These tools are formed by two things, which each have an infinite number of possibilities associated with them -

    Designs come from your knowledge of your tools and your abilities, realized or not.

    Designs also come from your particular situation.


    I think it's entirely possible that two people who have the same tools and the same interests could invent the same thing independently. I think this is true because of the possibilities granted to you by your understanding of yourself and your tools.


    It's kinda like a script for a computer, the way I see it. Each choice effects thousands of other choices instantly, and in seconds one idea can grow tremendously.

    I've tested my theory with everything I've done. People say you need years of experience and practice to do what I do. With cable installs, my own tinkering I do sometimes produces an item a lot better than I'd hoped for, and with hobbies as well. For example, I took up axe throwing on a whim at a friend's house. until this point, I'd never intentionally thrown an axe in my life. The other day I did, from about 15 feet away. I missed a couple of times at first, but once I hit it the first time, I could hit it all day long. Running, squatting, jumping, going backwards, blah blah etc etc.. these were no longer factors, because I knew how the axe flew. In any given situation, I know how that axe is gunna fly. Picked it up really fast, and I finally got my own target setup so I can throw my own axe at it.



    Point in case - I think you can look at your kids personality and realize that if his primary concern at that moment was shooting stuff, he might do it this way.

    Or, if you observe your kid running up to threats on a regular basis, without regard for himself or anything else, you might want to get him a shotgun.

    Or, if you observe your kid observing a threat before he interacts with it, might wanna get him a good scoped rifle.
     
  20. The Freeholder

    The Freeholder Member

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    I have two battle rifles, a pistol, a shotgun and a rimfire for each kid--each one is theirs as soon as they are legal, have a place to to live and buy a proper gun safe.
     
  21. Titan6

    Titan6 member

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    Good God Badger! Are you adopting 44 YO white men? Because I am available.
     
  22. mudriver

    mudriver Member

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    I might be a bit extreme, but my boys (age 10 and 8) have 5 guns each already. They've bought 2 each (with grandma's money) and I bought them C&R guns that I thought they could enjoy (Carcano, M95, etc). I think the most I ever paid for a gun was $100 for them, but they cherish each one a lot more than the X-box games they would have got.

    I'll split my collection and my dad's with them and their cousins since in my family firearms are heirlooms.
     
  23. entropy

    entropy Member

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    All he owns, save for those he deems necessary for his wife's use.
     
  24. entropy

    entropy Member

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    Can you be my Dad, 45Badger?
     
  25. FlyinBryan

    FlyinBryan Member

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    a 22 rifle (ruger 10/22 which he promptly saved his money and put a gm target barrel on)
    a 22 pistol (a browning buckmark which is so accurate he likes as is)
    a reminton 1100 12 gauge

    and next in line will go something like this:

    a 16" ar15.
    a mosin nagant 91/30
    a springfield m1 garand (a cherry)
    a 1911 (model still to be decided.)
    a springfield m1a national match rifle.

    and on my 60th birthday, a barrett model m82 semi auto 50 cal.

    the rest will be up to him, but i expect all of the ones i give him to be handed down to my 1 and only grandson.
     
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