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What is a good, reasonably priced rifle safe?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by M.E.Eldridge, Mar 28, 2006.

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  1. M.E.Eldridge

    M.E.Eldridge Member

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    Hello, I want to get a new rifle safe and want to buy a decent one that meets the following requirements:

    Holds at least ten long guns upto 50 inches in length
    Have a solid, strong frame without weighing a ton
    Have extra storage shelf for cleaning stuff and accesories
    Be priced fairly
     
  2. Kentucky

    Kentucky Member

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    I dont have an answer but I am beginning to look for something similiar myself. My other parameters would be that it is fireproof and can be bolted to the floor
     
  3. Car Knocker

    Car Knocker Member

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    M.E.E.,

    Who are you looking to keep out? Young kids? Teeagers? Smash and grab burglars? Someone with a little time to break into the safe?
     
  4. Rico567

    Rico567 Member

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    I looked at safes, and found that my requirements were sort of like looking for a reasonably priced family spaceship. Also, other very real issues have been brought out in the posts to this thread.

    1) How many guns will it hold?

    2) Does it need to be fireproof?

    3) How secure is it, and against whom?

    4) What does it weigh?


    As far as #1 is concerned, although I don't have a ton of guns, I wanted something reasonably spacious. The idea of cramming my guns into the minimum size available didn't do much for me. The more I looked, though, the less I liked the prices.
    I ended up buying about $500 worth of 12 ga. steel & angle iron, which I spent way too much time welding into two boxes about the size and shape of phone booths. One phone booth had a door on the front end. (I could have gone with a double-door system, but it's simpler to just reach across and put guns in and take them out from the side without the door.
    That part of the process went through about 3 boxes of welding rods, but since a friend had thoughtfully designed the thing to conceal my bubbblegum welds, it actually looks OK. I then got the thing in my basement and set up, and drilled the two halves through and fastened them together with a sackful of Grade 5 bolts.
    The resulting product easily holds my long guns & pistols, and is quite roomy. The door locks with a high-grade padlock that is recessed such that it cannot be got at with a saw or bolt cutters. It's in the basement, so I decided to forego the fireproofing, for better or worse. I installed a Goldenrod dehumidifer and an interior light.
    Since my safe it was bolted together in the basement, it CANNOT be removed from the basement without breaking it open; it weighs around 770 pounds without guns, and just won't go up the stairs. Could a serious pro burglar get into it? No doubt....but that's an unlikely scenario in our neck of the woods.
    Five years after the fact, I'm very pleased with my home-made project.
     
  5. Ukraine Train

    Ukraine Train Member

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    Define "priced fairly" a little more specifically. For about $300 you can get a really strong "locker" with a tri-bolt lock. Or you can spend double that for something the same size but much stronger and fire retardent.
     
  6. Mizzle187

    Mizzle187 Member

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    I just bought a Liberty Colonial 23 gun safe Today. A local gun shop is having a "sale" and free delivery. Its more than I originally planned on spending but it is very nice! I originaly bought a Sentry 14 gun safe but after having to refuse 2 of them for being damaged by the freight company I vowed to buy locally and Im glad I did even though I spent more money. I feel it was worth it. I am not bashing Sentrys safes at all though as I never actually took delivery of one. For what its worth the damaged ones where drop shipped from Sentry.
     
  7. Ala Dan

    Ala Dan Member in memoriam

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    I also just acquired a brand new Liberty Colonial Series gun safe. Mine
    is forrest green with brass trim, and weighs 565 lbs. Its fire rated at
    1200 degrees for 45 minutes, and has 10 1" diameter locking bolts;
    with an easy too use combination. I also sell these safes at work
    (I'm in the firearms business~!:D) for the everyday low price of
    $999.88. However, delivery to your residence is on you; as we
    have no means to provide transportation for your safe. So far,
    I'm very well pleased with the peace of mind that this Liberty
    safe allows me to have~!:cool: :)
     
  8. eagle45

    eagle45 Member

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    I have a Heritage safe that I bought a couple of years ago during a sale at a local gun shop. I passed on the fancy finish and bought a plain finish model with an upgraded door (thicker) and 14 - 1 1/4" door bolts and a nicer interior. It is 36" wide by 28" deep and 60" tall with an electronic lock and a 5 point gold handle. You can remove a set of shelves and store more guns, but I like using the shelves as I store a lot more than guns in it. It cost more than I wanted to spend, but I figured it was a one time purchase. Since it weighs 900 pounds, I used a safe mover the two times I have moved it. It is also rated at 1200 degrees for an hour.

    The same store now has a 30 x 21 x 60 model that weighs 540 pounds on sale for $700. It is 15 to 27 gun expandable, is rated at 1200 degrees for 20 minutes.

    Here is the link for Heritage:
    http://www.heritagesafe.com/index.html
    I've been well pleased with mine. I've never regretted spending the extra money.
     
  9. a1abdj

    a1abdj Member

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    There are many safes available that serve many different functions. In your case, it may be simpler to figure out what you want to spend, and then buy the best safe available for that price.

    Keep in mind that you get what you pay for, so there isn't such a thing as an inexpensive, quality product.

    Everybody can claim that they own the best safe available for the best price, but that’s hard to do since most of these people have never had their safe burglarized or involved in a fire.

    Myself and another member have posted previously regarding what things to look for in a safe if you're interested in locating those old posts.

    Wouldn't that be like purchasing a new car from a dealership that didn't have a service department or body shop?

    No offense against your business, but I've found that many people who sell safes out of normal retail stores have no idea what they're selling. Customers end up buying safes that won't do what they're expecting them to do.
     
  10. Ala Dan

    Ala Dan Member in memoriam

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    Att: a1abdj my friend

    I also sell every grade of Browning safes made, so YES I have a working
    knowledge of what safe's are suppose too do~!;) I chose the Liberty
    because I like having the hinges on the inside of the door; not on the
    out side like the Browning's. Of course, keep in mind that the doors on
    the Liberty's won't open quite as wide as those found on the Browning's.:D
     
  11. a1abdj

    a1abdj Member

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    I'm not trying to put you down or cause any arguments. We delivery safes for many people like yourself.

    However, selling Liberty and Browning gun safes, and calling yourself a safe expert is similar to a kid who's taken apart his bb gun and then claiming to be a gunsmith.

    When you want to know if a safe salesperson knows anything about what they're selling, ask them the following questions:

    Are you licensed and bonded/insured?
    Are you a member of SAVTA, NSO, or other professional organizations?
    How many safes have you moved the last 30 days?
    How many locked safes have you opened the last 30 days?

    People who work on safes, move safes, AND sell safes tend to have a better handle on safes, their requirements, and how those safes will function for specific purposes. Many of the people who simply sell safes are not familiar with safe construction, function, insurance requiments, government regualations, and other important information which may be important to the consumer.
     
  12. odysseus

    odysseus Member

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    Question: Most safes have bolts that go across all sides (top and bottom too in some cases) of the door. So even if you had outside hinges you still need to break the inside bolts to get the door open, so the hinges are moot at that point. Am I wrong? I wondered about this before, but I currently go on that understanding now.

    So my understanding too is that safes are not weak at that point, but usually just on the depth and quality of the side wall security from brute force attack and cutting there. Wrong again here?
     
  13. Ala Dan

    Ala Dan Member in memoriam

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    Att: odysseus my friend-

    Perhaps, I am not qualified too comment on your questions~? Most
    likely you are correct in your way of thinking; but I will defer my
    thoughts to let our friend a1abdj answer; as he is the in house
    safe expert. So, will you please step forward SIR, and field this very
    valid question~?
     
  14. Hot brass

    Hot brass Member

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    M.E.Eldridge
    Do a search on Visalia Safes, price and quality.
     
  15. a1abdj

    a1abdj Member

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    In many cases, safes with thicker steel plate only lock on the opening side. Once the steel gets to a certain thickness, prying it becomes very difficult, and the additional bolts aren't going to make a difference.

    Since most gun safes use steel that is easy to pry, the top and bottom bolts can be important, and help keep somebody from opening the door.

    It doesn't matter if the bolts are live bolts, dead bolts, or even a solid bar. Most quality safes of any type lock themselves against the hinge side. Cutting off hinges will not get you into a quality safe.

    With many gun safes, you could cut a hole through the safe big enough to walk through just as fast as you could cut off the hinges.

    A chain is only as strong as it's weakest link. Most safes have doors stronger than their bodies, including gun safes. The problem with gun safes is that the steel is so thin. Your typical gun safe has 10 or 12 gauge steel. 10 gauge steel is around 1/8" thick.

    To put this in perspective, a UL TL-15 rated steel plate chest has a 1 inch plate body. These safes are designed to defeat common hand tools, power tools and pressure applying devices for 15 minutes.
     
  16. asknight

    asknight Member

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    a1abdj, would you kindly point out where Ala Dan claimed to be an expert? A allegation that you so rudely accused him of, that I see no evidence of occuring.
     
  17. a1abdj

    a1abdj Member

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    I am not, and have not made any allegations. In addition, I will restate that I am not bashing anybody.

    Regardless of what industry you are in, many consumers consider those selling a product to be an expert in their field. There are many people selling gun safes (a security product that people depend on), that are beyond clueless. These people pass along false information, often times not even knowing that it's false.

    Ala Dan claimed that he sold both Liberty and Browning products then stated his working knowledge of what safes do. I am assuming this information comes from Liberty and Browning themselves....companies that themselves knowingly misrepresent their products.

    I never stated that he himself did not know what he was speaking about, but made a simple comparison that I see every day in the St. Louis area. We handle the deliveries for many retailers who happen to sell gun safes. In fact, our two largest customers are a Liberty dealer and a Browning dealer.
    I have heard their sales pitches, and would definately not call them an expert, or even go as far as saying that they have a general understanding. In the real world, the people listening to these pitches are under the assumption that the sales person knows what he/she is talking about.

    I appoligize if I offended Ala Dan, or yourself, that was not my intention. What I'm trying to say is no different than telling a heart patient that he should see a cardiologist instead of a veterinarian.
     
  18. aguyindallas

    aguyindallas Member

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  19. Relodr

    Relodr Member

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    Not many basements in So. Cal. and the slab in my garage has "Post Tension Slab. Do not cut or bore." notes in every corner. I don't know what happens if I cut or bore but I'm not about to find out. What's to do in a case like this? I guess I need one too heavy to steal however much that is.


    Relodr
     
  20. a1abdj

    a1abdj Member

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    Don't laugh......

    They make epoxies that you could use to glue your safe to the floor.

    You might also consider bolting the safe through it's back or side into a wall.
     
  21. offthepaper

    offthepaper Member

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    I bought a Liberty safe recently, 28" width. One of the lower models, but it was all I can afford (divorce). I've been happy with it so far (of course it has'nt had to face the ultimate test yet) for the cost. I was lucky enough to get a deal on the delivery since I lived less than a mile from the store. Sometimes the delivery charge can be substantial, I've heard of $200-$300 standard delivery and possibly more if you want placed somewhere "challenging". Dick's Sporting Goods stores around here sell the Reminton Safes for $600, but offer no delivery. If you have a truck and a couple of good sized friends, maybe an option. :)
     
  22. offthepaper

    offthepaper Member

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    Not many basements in So. Cal. and the slab in my garage has "Post Tension Slab. Do not cut or bore." notes in every corner. I don't know what happens if I cut or bore but I'm not about to find out.
    -------------------------
    Not sure but this may be to prevent the puncture of a moisture barrier under the slab. If penetrated there may be possible issues with mold. Someone familiar with safe installations may know more about this.
     
  23. CB900F

    CB900F Member

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    Fella's;

    I am an expert on safes, and I believe that a1abdj should be considered as one also.

    Internal hinges: May the fleas of a thousand camels infest the BVD's of the microcephalic who thought that one up. Given the sheet metal construction of RSC's, it's entirely possible that one day down the road, your internally hinged door is going to need to be adjusted. That sheet metal box can, and will, spring out of true. Call somebody else, because I will make you pay for not doing your research first. I'm busy & quite literally have better things to do.

    Liberty tin boxes :barf:: No plate steel anywhere. A triumph of marketing over protection. Composite construction door means a sheet metal wrap over a core of insulation. At least buy something with a 1/4" plate door.

    C'mon guys, a1a & I have put the information out on this site many times. Do a search for RSC, safe, a1abdj, or CB900F, before you spend your money.

    900F
     
  24. asknight

    asknight Member

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    Relodr, please see http://www.johnbridge.com/concrete_slabs.htm

    From that link: To counteract poor soil conditions and subsidence in our area, tract housing builders have come up with a technique called "post-tensioning." A post-tension slab is built with beams (thickened concrete) running through it at right angles to one another, as well as a continuous beam around its perimeter. A sheathed cable is laid through each interior beam before the slab is poured. After the slab has cured, the ends of the cables are pulled taught with a tensioning device and tied off. This puts a slight camber in the slab, giving it spring. Supposedly, this will hold the slab together, even if the soil beneath it shifts. Post-tension slab.

    In other words, if you drill or bore it you will be weakening the structure and it will crack and crumble. A house with a crumbled foundation is no house. :uhoh:
     
  25. Foxtrot427

    Foxtrot427 Member

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    Sentry makes pretty inexpensive safes. Depending on the decor of your room they may or may not look good. I know looks arnt most important but if you have one in a room with alot of wood and warm colors then the black may not look good and be better in a room with mostly whites and blacks or one that is more modern. Ive always heard good things about them and they are mostly only around 300lbs while having a bolt down ability.
     
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