What is an inline good for?

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by brewer12345, Oct 10, 2021.

  1. brewer12345

    brewer12345 Member

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    I have always been happy with my percussion guns, but I am the only one in my hunting party not shooting an inline. What is the attraction? These just look like a short cut to be legal for ML season without having to do the fussier stuff that comes with percussion or flint. Am I missing anything?
     
  2. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    Not in my opinion.

    My general experience has been that the typical owner believes "traditional" muzzleloaders are unreliable and ineffective, and/or bought an inline solely to extend his hunting season. These folks also tend to put on big scopes, load with pelletized powder and sabotted bullets, and claim that they've got a 200+ yard gun.

    I really try not to be a preachy purist, but I can't help but believe that they are the ones missing out.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2021
  3. red rick

    red rick Member

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    I like hunting . A in-line is easier to use , clean and scope . That is the appeal to me . I am only going to use it 2 weeks a year then firearms season comes in . IMO a percussion muzzleloader is also stepping away form primitive hunting if that is the bash on a inline . A Flintlock I can see as primitive .
     
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  4. Bazoo

    Bazoo Member

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    I think you hit the nail on the head. It's just a way for a person to hunt muzzleloader season without being a ML enthusiast.

    I like percussion guns, but I happen to have an inline that was given to me. My only use for it is to extend the season. The other use would be if I happen to get the chance to hunt a ML only area.
     
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  5. brewer12345

    brewer12345 Member

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    In lines are legal for ml season here, but you aren't allowed to use a scope or pelletized powder, no sabots, etc. So I guess I don't see the appeal. However, they are slightly lower maintenance and you can buy a new one for 300 bucks, so maybe that is it.

    As for effectiveness, I have tagged out 3 seasons in a row with percussion guns, so all my buddies have clear evidence of effectiveness. And with the shortages they will all be coming to me for 209 primers, since none of them reload shotshells.
     
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  6. CoalCrackerAl

    CoalCrackerAl Member

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    I use an inline for the one week in oct deer hunt. And a flintlock in the late season. I find both are fun to shoot too.
     
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  7. Hugger-4641

    Hugger-4641 Member

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    You are exactly right. I am not a true black powder enthusiast. I use an inline because its the easiest most reliable way for me to take advantage of an extra two weeks to put venison in the freezer.
     
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  8. Captain*kirk

    Captain*kirk Member

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    Not a thing. Your vision is 20/20.
     
  9. BullRunBear

    BullRunBear Member

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    I've always assumed that inlines were just utilitarian, a way to extend the hunting season. A muzzleloader for people who don't care about muzzleloading. After all, they can be relatively inexpensive, are somewhat easier to maintain, can be easily scoped, and allow for ways of easier, faster loading. They engender zero historical interest and short circuit the idea of learning an old skill.

    I've never cared for them but never criticized anyone for using one. To each their own. My initial interest was historical. People who know I enjoy black powder firearms ask me questions and are surprised I know nothing about inlines. Just gives me a chance to explain why I find traditional styles more attractive and interesting.

    Jeff
     
  10. tachelberry

    tachelberry Member

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    The inline feature is a far more reliable form of ignition. They tend to be more consistent when the weather is damp
     
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  11. Eyrie G. Dogg

    Eyrie G. Dogg Member

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    Good for poaching. A poor substitute for reality.
     
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  12. JCooperfan1911

    JCooperfan1911 Member

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    They are for people that want to take advantage of muzzleloader only deer season but want the easiest most user friendly and effective gun for the task. I have very rarely seen folks buy them for target shooting but don’t really understand the appeal for that.

    I would never own one as I adore traditional flintlock and percussion rifles, but honestly don’t get wrapped around the axle too much about them. I’d rather have people hunting and enjoying nature than not.
     
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  13. Hugger-4641

    Hugger-4641 Member

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    Not sure where you're going with that. If I was going to poach, it wouldn't be with a muzzle loader.
    If you are somehow implying that using an inline is some how morally or subvertably illegal, then I doubt that opinion is shared by many.
     
  14. Eyrie G. Dogg

    Eyrie G. Dogg Member

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    Inlines are a way to cheat the season. They have neither tradition nor honor.
     
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  15. Hugger-4641

    Hugger-4641 Member

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    We could have another whole discussion on whether there should even be a season when hunting for sustenance on my own land, but that's off topic.

    By your logic we should all be using re-curve bows for archery season also. You are entitled to your opinion, glad its not a pervasive one.

    My hat's off to the true black powder enthusiasts who keep the craft alive. That's why I look in in this forum from time to time, but I have no intention at this moment of relegating myself to it. I'll keep using my inline.
     
  16. noelf2

    noelf2 Member

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    I shoot and hunt with both sidelocks and inlines. I have Leupold glass on the inline, and open sights or bead sights on my sidelocks. Why limit your options?
     
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  17. brewer12345

    brewer12345 Member

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    Different strokes, for sure. The inlines don't get you anything special under my state's rules, since no scopes, pellets, sabots, etc. allowed in ML season. In rifle season you can use anything you like, but other than the few dedicated handgun hunters, I almost universally see modern cartridge rifles used then.

    I don't much care if someone uses an in line or a match lock. I really just was curious if I was missing something about what they are, since I shoot a lot of percussion in the summer months for fun.
     
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  18. rabid wombat

    rabid wombat Member

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    You nailed it

    Like anything, muzzleloading will cover the gamut. As well stated above…anything from primitive to modern. I am at the modern end - I bought an inline to extend seasons. I also got one to handle one of the first black powder substitutes - smokeless - yes, I am a heretic! Mine (Savage ML10 https://randywakeman.com/savage3.htm) is a muzzleloader in loading only. It is a throughly modern rifle in all facets, except the way it is loaded. I will let you know how it performs…someday I will shoot it (it is only 10 years old, no reason to rush into things :rofl:)

    The good news, Texas law allows for it:

    Muzzleloader Only White-tailed Deer Season
    A muzzleloader is any firearm that is loaded only through the muzzle. Note: A cap and ball firearm in which the powder and ball are loaded into a cylinder is not a muzzleloader. Muzzleloader deer seasons are restricted to muzzleloading firearms only.
    https://tpwd.texas.gov/regulations/outdoor-annual/regs/season-types/muzzleloader

    Most will say Texas hunting is not REAL hunting either (blinds, feeders, etc…).

    I also have a bow (compound). With the current assortment of sights and triggers…it is a rifle without the range! I had a friend try it (he is a GOOD shooter), but never had pulled a bow. He was in the target on his first shot…due to his good foundation in shooting. This is in spite of being left handed, and shooting my right handed bow.

    Some hunt pig with knives or spears…do what is right for you…and enjoy being outdoors with your family and friends.
     
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  19. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    The thing with MLs is they are not user friendly if you only have ever known about cartridge firearms. Take the Traditions Strikefire for instance. The Strikefire takes that learning curve and makes it much easier and faster to use effectively and safely even if it is a pretty far cry from anything traditional.

    You don’t need to know about different brands or types of powders or charge weights or pellets vs loose. You just take the fire stick and load it into the breach like a single shot break action and ram the bullet (most likely and easy to load typ bullet). Traditions and Federal tell you all you need to know by buying their prepared powder charges and bullets.

    Takes all the need to read up and research out of the picture. It’s a perfect product for the society we are evolving into. Instant gratification with the least amount of effort. My dad has always said, if you want to be rich, invent something that can make people lazier. Then he uses the TV remote control as an example. Ive noticed you can probably get more rich by making already lazy people even lazier.

    Not to say anyone buying a Strikefire is lazy as it is an intriguing product. I myself have several modern muzzleloaders and don’t particularly consider myself lazy. Modern MLs can be very user friendly and convenient to effectively take game.

    I am not a pellets type of ML shooter though. I use loose powder always and have researched and learned how to use it correctly as many here also have. I buy my sabots and bullets separately so I can have greater control over the bullets I use as opposed to buying the “canned” bullets the ML manufacturers market. Nothing wrong with any of it though. I just get a little more into the process
     
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  20. Bazoo

    Bazoo Member

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    I've not shot my inline, but I've researched it some. The feller that gave it to me said they got less than 2" 3 shot groups at 100 yards regularly. I have a mould for the maxi balls he said it likes. So even though it's a modern inline I'm going to put my personal touch on it.

    I'd rather have a traditional cap gun like a Lyman trade rifle. That's what I had before and sold it off.
     
  21. Dirty Bob

    Dirty Bob Member

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    I've considered one as a "trunk gun" that happened to use black powder. In addition to easy scoping, some companies offer peep or other sights that are easier for aging eyes.

    In today's ammo climate, I can shoot black powder cheaper than almost any other firearm. An inline is easier to clean from the breech, so it would allow me to go enjoy an hour or two of shooting inexpensively, then clean up quickly and easily before heading home. Many inlines also offer rust-resistant finishes.

    I haven't hunted for a while. An inline doesn't stir any emotions in me the way a black powder Sharps does, but it's less expensive and could serve as a black powder utility rifle to keep around in case I get some free time for an impromptu range trip.

    Dirty Bob
     
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  22. Malachi Leviticus Blue

    Malachi Leviticus Blue Member

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    Inlines are the natural progression of muzzleoaders.
    Lots and lots of the custom muzzleloading target pistols were inline even well over half a century ago.
    I have several inlines including an authentic Tingle target pistol (as well as the Itallian copies), a Knight Hawkeye, CVA Optima, TC Scout pistol, Traditions Vortek, Traditions Buckhunter, TC Encore, and probably some more I'm not recalling.
    I also have a couple flintlocks, and many many other percussion rifles, shotguns, revolvers, and pistols.
    Anyone who wants to shame hunters using inline muzzleloaders better be using either an Atlatl (at most) or their bare hands and teeth if they are claiming the high ground.
    I thoroughly enjoy shooting, hunting with or gazing at all of them.
    I'm even considering trying to use some "antique" Pyrodex in the GREEN cardboard canister since everyone seems to be hoarding the real BP. When I shake the can I can tell It is still loose powder.
     
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  23. tactikel

    tactikel Member

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    Match locks, wheel locks, flint locks, muskets, percussion, inlines.
    Muzzleloader progression over 700 years.
     
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  24. stolivar

    stolivar Member

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    1808 patent was the first for a muzzleloading in-line action in which the cock of the sidelock was replaced by a cylindrical hammer driven by a coil spring.

    His in-line invention was capitalized on by Dreyse, who worked for Pauly between 1808-14 and who used it as the basis for his 1838 turnbolt design which became the Prussian Needlegun of 1848.
     
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  25. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    Matchlock to 209 fired inline.

    It’s like comparing a self bow to a Ravin R29.

    It’s the free market at work all while working within the varying laws of varying states.

    These are primarily hunting arms. Hunters are dwindling more every year. Jurisdictions allow these new technologies to keep the numbers of hunters up and keep revenue up. Some places, like the NW, resist the new technologies. Are they better for it?

    A few states in the south allow break action single shots, among others, for “primitive weapons” seasons.
     
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